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Latest Anti-Doping News


29/11/19 WADA OPENS REGISTRATION FOR 2020 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

Montreal, 29 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that online registration is now open for the 16th edition of the Agency’s Annual Symposium. The Symposium, which will be held at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland on 17-18 March 2020 will, due to the success of last year’s format, follow with an entirely dedicated Athlete Session on 19 March.

The WADA Symposium, which is the main event on the global anti-doping calendar, gathers anti-doping practitioners from around the world and provides them with the opportunity to interact and learn from one another. The Symposium will once again welcome athletes, representatives from Anti-Doping Organizations, Governments, WADA-accredited Laboratories and Athlete Passport Management Units; as well as, other stakeholders such as the media, researchers and service providers — all that are integral to clean sport.

Under the theme “Bringing the 2021 Code and Standards into action”, the 2020 Symposium will primarily aim to assist World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the 2021 Code and International Standards, which will enter into force on 1 January 2021.

Athlete Session

As it relates to the dedicated Athlete Session on 19 March, under the leadership of WADA’s Athlete Committee, the Agency will once again welcome participation of athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies. Anti-Doping Organizations are asked to encourage the participation of athlete representatives, which are invited to participate in the Symposium and in the Athlete Session free of charge, in order to maximize athlete attendance and voices. With former elite athletes Witold Banka and Yang Yang assuming their roles as WADA President and Vice-President, respectively, on 1 January 2020, we are confident that athletes will increasingly be engaged to positively influence the global pursuit of Clean Sport.

Registration

Should you wish to register for the Symposium and/or the Athlete Session (which is exclusively dedicated to athletes, athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies), please do so on the Symposium Website by 26 February 2020. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the preliminary program, how to register and how to book your hotel accommodations.

Please note that in an effort to harmonize the registration process across all WADA events, the Agency has recently updated its registration terms and conditions. We strongly recommend that all stakeholders review them before registering.

WADA looks forward to welcoming you in Lausanne as the Agency partners with all stakeholders to bring the 2021 Code and Standards into action. Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


27/11/19 WADA LAUNCHES ITS NEW ATHLETE CENTRAL WHEREABOUTS APP

Montreal, 27 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that as of today, Athlete Central, the Agency’s new App that facilitates athlete compliance with Whereabouts rules under the global anti-doping program, is available for use and download from the Apple Store and Google Play. Athlete Central, which is powered by WADA’s Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS), replaces WADA’s current App that has been operational for a few years and required modernizing.
 
Whereabouts rules, which are a key component of global sport’s crucial out-of-competition testing programs, are part of the International Standard for Testing and Investigations. The rules require a limited number of top-level athletes within a Registered Testing Pool (RTP) to provide their Anti-Doping Organization (ADO) with details of where they can be found for one hour every day. 
 
WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “We are very pleased that WADA’s launch of Athlete Central will dramatically improve and facilitate the athlete experience in complying with their Whereabouts requirements. The new app will allow WADA and ADOs to better support clean athletes, who want to be able to compete on a level playing field. Since the inception of Whereabouts rules, these rules have been modified and improved to make them more user-friendly and less intrusive while retaining their impact. Today, we can proudly say that we have gone one step further in WADA’s mission to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping free sport.”
 
To better understand the needs of its key beneficiaries – the athletes, Athlete Central was developed taking careful consideration of their feedback. WADA’s project team solicited athletes’ views actively and received 2,500 unique submissions that then shaped the App’s specifications. In addition, in the lead-up to today’s launch, some ADO staff tested the App and a significant number of active athletes have been trialing it to file their Whereabouts. WADA also provided a demo of Athlete Central to interested athletes and other participants of the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, that was held from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland.
 
WADA Deputy Director, Standards & Harmonization and Principal, ADAMS Advancement, Stuart Kemp, said: “This is a significant milestone in the ADAMS ‘Next Gen’ project and athlete feedback was paramount in delivering what we believe is a new, easy and secure way for athletes to provide their Whereabouts. Features such as location-based address recommendations, dashboard, push notifications and Single Sign-On (SSO), will positively impact the way athletes provide Whereabouts information, making it easier to comply anytime, anywhere. We hope Athlete Central meets athletes’ expectations and we look forward to delivering the next modules of ADAMS ‘Next Gen’ to the anti-doping community.
  
For more information, please:

 About ADAMS
 
ADAMS is a secure and free, web-based system that centralizes doping control-related information such as athlete Whereabouts, testing history, laboratory results, the Athlete Biological Passport, Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs) and information on Anti-Doping Rule Violations.
 
In 2017, significant upgrades to ADAMS’ underlying infrastructure laid the foundation for the complete rebuild of ADAMS, which will serve all athletes and anti-doping stakeholders better going forward. Referred to as ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS, the rebuild prioritizes mobility of ADAMS use, enhanced connectivity, reliability and performance, as well as general usability. All of ADAMS’ new features are also designed with privacy, information security, and transparency for end users as a priority.
 
Planning and development of ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS first focused on the development of Athlete Central. Other modules are to follow, which WADA will communicate to stakeholders in due course.


26/11/19 WADA LAUNCHES ITS NEW ATHLETE CENTRAL WHEREABOUTS APP

Montreal, 26 November 2019

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to inform Anti-Doping Organizations that beginning tomorrow, 27 November, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) new Athlete Central Whereabouts app will be available for download and use from the Apple Store and Google Play.

As previously communicated, Athlete Central is WADA’s new App that will facilitate athlete compliance with Whereabouts rules under the global anti-doping program. Athlete Central will replace WADA’s current App that has been operational for a few years and required modernizing.

Athlete Central is the first module of WADA’s Anti-Doping and Administration Management System (ADAMS) ‘Next Gen’ project, which is one of WADA’s strategic priorities. The ‘Next Gen’ project intends to rebuild ADAMS in a way that better serves all athletes and anti-doping stakeholders going forward. It prioritizes mobility of ADAMS use, enhanced connectivity, reliability and performance, as well as general usability. Other modules are to follow, which WADA will communicate to you in due course.

In order to support the deployment of Athlete Central, we have prepared the following communications tools for Anti-Doping Organizations that can be leveraged via your communication channels.

  • Email Signatures – you can choose your preferred one, or alternate them
  • Promotional Poster – PDF version for print
  • Fact Sheet
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Images for your social media channels

You can download these tools by visiting the Athlete Central page of WADA’s website.

Should you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact us at athletecentral@wada-ama.org.

We would also very much welcome your and your athletes’ feedback about Athlete Central.

Thank you for your support and best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


26/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES APPROVED 2021 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Montreal, 26 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards), which were approved by the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) – as relates to the Standards – and Foundation Board (Board) – as relates to the Code – at the conclusion of WADA’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport on 7 November 2019. The 2021 Code and Standards are set to come into force on 1 January 2021.

[As regards the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), the situation is slightly different. The new version approved in May 2019 will now be reviewed in order to reflect and incorporate any relevant changes into the Standard and to ensure consistency with the other documents that were approved during the World Conference. The amended draft will then be circulated for stakeholder consultation from 10 December 2019 to 4 March 2020; following which, it will be tabled at WADA’s September 2020 ExCo meeting for approval. It will subsequently enter into force on 1 January 2021, along with the revised Code and all other Standards.]

The Agency is also pleased to publish the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act (previously known as the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights), which was also approved by WADA’s ExCo on 7 November. The Act, which was developed by WADA’s Athlete Committee in consultation with thousands of athletes and stakeholders worldwide, is based on the 2021 Code and Standards and aims to ensure that athlete rights within anti-doping are clearly set out, accessible, and universally applicable.

The approved versions of the Code, Standards and Act will now be translated into French and branded; following which, the final versions will be published on WADA’s website in early 2020.

2021 Code Review Process

In December 2017, WADA initiated a 2021 Code Review Process, which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code; two for the related Standards and one for the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to further strengthen the global anti-doping program.

Following the review process, stakeholders were invited to intervene publicly on the proposed Code and Standards during the World Conference – an opportunity which was taken up by over 70 stakeholder organizations – before the Code and the full suite of Standards were approved by the Board and ExCo respectively.

WADA is confident that the Review Process – which was reported upon on multiple occasions to the Agency’s ExCo and Board – was extensive and transparent. The Agency is grateful to all stakeholders for their high-quality feedback and to the drafting teams that have delivered on this momentous effort that will result in greater protection for Clean Sport.

WADA’s 2021 Code Implementation Stakeholder Support Program

On 18 October, WADA published a Development and Implementation Guide for Stakeholders, which summarizes matters of importance related to the Review Process; in particular:

  • the significant changes between the current 2015 Code and the 2021 Code;
  • the significant changes between the current Standards and the recently approved Standards; and
  • a summary of the key topics being addressed in the new Standards.

The Guide also touches upon WADA’s Stakeholder Support Program, which WADA will develop and coordinate with partners in 2020. Our aim is to assist Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the Code and the Standards that will enter into force on 1 January 2021. 

More information related to the Support Program, including the resources that will be made available for Signatories, will be shared in 2020. In the meantime, should you have any questions regarding the above-mentioned documents, please feel free to contact: code@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


25/11/19 WADA COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS SERIES OF STRONG CONSEQUENCES FOR RUSADA NON-COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 25 November 2019 – Having considered a report from the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) and independent forensic experts, WADA’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) has recommended to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) that the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) be declared non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), as announced by WADA on 22 November 2019. This recommendation is accompanied by strong proposed consequences and conditions of reinstatement.   
 
The CRC’s recommendation was delivered to the ExCo in accordance with the agreed process under the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS). Because the contents of the document have since appeared in part in the media, WADA is now making the following details of the CRC recommendation public. The ExCo will consider the recommendation at a specially convened meeting in Paris on 9 December 2019.
 
CRC recommendation in relation to non-compliance with data requirement
 
The 26-page CRC recommendation, which is signed by CRC Chair, Jonathan Taylor QC, reminds the ExCo that as part of the 20 September 2018 decision to reinstate RUSADA to the list of Code-compliant Signatories, “WADA’s ExCo deemed the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow Data to be ‘Critical’ because:

  1. it would enable the anti-doping community finally to resolve and draw a line under the allegations of a systematic conspiracy to dope Russian athletes;
  2. it would ensure that any Russian athletes who had tested positive could be punished; and
  3. just as importantly it would ensure that innocent Russian athletes could be cleared of suspicion.”

The WADA I&I report was based in particular on a forensic review of inconsistencies found in some of the data that were obtained by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. Following WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA, this review also included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions raised by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts.

Based on the reports issued by WADA I&I and the experts at the conclusion of their review, the CRC determined that:

  • The Moscow data are neither complete nor fully authentic. In particular, while the 2019 copy of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) database matches in many respects the 2015 copy of the LIMS database provided to WADA by a whistleblower in 2017, hundreds of presumptive adverse analytical findings that appear in the 2015 copy of the LIMS database have been removed from the 2019 copy, and the related underlying raw data and PDF files have been deleted or altered.
  • Some of the presumptive positive findings and related evidence were removed in 2016 or 2017, after the general scheme to cover up the doping of Russian athletes was first revealed by Dr Rodchenkov and then quickly confirmed by Prof. Richard McLaren’s investigation (Part 1 and Part 2). However, further significant deletions and/or alterations were made in December 2018 and January 2019 (i.e., after the WADA ExCo imposed the data requirement). These activities were concealed by back-dating of computer systems and data files in an attempt to make it appear that the Moscow data had been in their current state since 2015. Furthermore, the commands issued to execute the manipulations, deletions and back-dating were also deleted, in an attempt to avoid detection of what had been done.
  • In addition, on or after 25 November 2018 (i.e., again, after the data requirement was imposed), but before 10 January 2019 (i.e., before the Moscow data were made available to the WADA team), someone in the Moscow Laboratory:

    – planted fabricated evidence into the LIMS database (purported messages between laboratory staff members) to support the argument now being advanced by the Russian authorities that it was Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov and two co-conspirators who falsified entries in the Moscow LIMS database as part of a scheme to extort money from athletes; and
    – deleted from the LIMS database important evidence proving that another laboratory staff member was involved in the cover-up of doping by Russian athletes in 2014 and 2015. That staff member is currently an important witness for the Russian side in several cases, in which he denies there was any conspiracy to protect Russian athletes from exposure for doping, and calls Dr. Rodchenkov a liar.

The CRC concluded that this is “an extremely serious case of non-compliance with the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow data, with several aggravating features”.

CRC recommendation in relation to consequences (abridged)

The CRC has therefore recommended that WADA send a formal notice to RUSADA, asserting non-compliance with the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow data, and proposing the following consequences, to come into effect on the date on which the decision that RUSADA is non-compliant becomes final and to remain in effect until the fourth anniversary of that date (‘the Four Year Period’):

  • Russian Government officials/representatives may not be appointed to sit and may not sit as members of the boards or committees or any other bodies of any Code Signatory (or its members) or association of Signatories.
  • Russian Government officials/representatives may not participate in or attend any of the following events held in the Four Year Period: (a) the Youth Olympic Games (summer and winter); (b) the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (summer and winter); (c) any other event organized by a Major Event Organisation; and (d) any World Championships organized or sanctioned by any Signatory (together, the Major Events).
  • Russia may not host in the Four Year Period, or bid for or be granted in the Four Year Period, the right to host (whether during or after the Four Year Period) any editions of the Major Events.
  • Where the right to host a Major Event in the Four Year Period has already been awarded to Russia, the Signatory must withdraw that right and re-assign the event to another country, unless it is legally or practically impossible to do so. In addition, Russia may not bid for the right to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, irrespective of whether the bidding takes place during or after the Four Year Period.
  • Russia’s flag may not be flown at any Major Event staged in the Four Year Period.
  • Neither the President, the Secretary-General, the CEO, nor any member of the Executive Board/Governing Board of either the Russian Olympic Committee or the Russian Paralympic Committee may participate in or attend any Major Event staged in the Four Year Period.
  • Russian athletes and their support personnel may only participate in Major Events staged in the Four Year Period where they are able to demonstrate that they are not implicated in any way by the non-compliance (i.e., they are not mentioned in incriminating circumstances in the McLaren reports, there are no positive findings reported for them in the database, and no data relating to their samples has been manipulated), in accordance with strict conditions to be defined by WADA (or the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), if it sees fit), pursuant to the mechanism foreseen in ISCCS Article 11.2.6. In this circumstance, they may not represent the Russian Federation.
  • Given the aggravating factors that are present in this case, RUSADA must pay all WADA’s costs on this file incurred since January 2019 and, in addition, a fine to WADA of 10% of its 2019 income or USD 100,000 (whichever is lower). This is the maximum fine available under the rules.

CRC recommendation concerning RUSADA’s operations
 
The CRC recommendation states that “the evidence (including from WADA’s recent audits of RUSADA’s operations) indicates that RUSADA’s work is effective in contributing to the fight against doping in Russian sport, and that it is working productively in cooperation with other Anti-Doping Organizations, including in investigations within Russia. Therefore, the CRC does not recommend any special monitoring or supervision or takeover of RUSADA’s anti-doping activities in the Four Year Period.”
 
However, one of the conditions of reinstatement is that WADA Management remains satisfied throughout the Four Year Period that RUSADA’s independence is being respected and there is no improper outside interference with its operations.
 
Next steps
 
On 9 December 2019, WADA’s ExCo will meet to discuss the CRC’s recommendation. If the ExCo accepts the recommendation, formal notice will be sent to RUSADA, alleging non-compliance and proposing the above consequences, in accordance with the Code. RUSADA will have 21 days to accept the notice. If RUSADA does not accept it, the matter will be referred to CAS. If CAS imposes the proposed consequences, they will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Signatories.


22/11/19 WADA’S COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS NON-COMPLIANCE FOR RUSADA

Montreal, 22 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that, today, WADA sent a recommendation of its independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) regarding the ongoing compliance procedure brought against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA). 

The detailed, confidential, document — which will be discussed by the ExCo at its meeting on 9 December in Paris, France — recommends that notice be sent to RUSADA asserting non-compliance with a Critical requirement of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS); proposing serious consequences in line with the principles set out in the ISCCS; and, proposing reinstatement conditions.

The CRC recommendation was based on reports by WADA Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) and independent forensic experts, which were considered by the CRC during their meeting of 17 November, regarding a number of inconsistencies found in some of the data that was retrieved by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. WADA I&I’s subsequent assessment included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions, including follow-up questions, raised by WADA I&I and the forensic experts.

These questions gave RUSADA and the Russian Ministry of Sport an opportunity to explain the inconsistencies, as part of WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA.

WADA continues to pursue this matter robustly and as quickly as practicable, while ensuring that due process is respected, as outlined in the ISCCS.

Meanwhile, as previously outlined, the 40+ cases that were sent by WADA in July to a number of International Federations for action were based on data that were unaffected by these inconsistencies. Accordingly, those cases can proceed without delay, and more such cases will follow in due course.


20/11/19 WADA SUSPENDS ACCREDITATION OF BANGKOK LABORATORY

Montreal, 20 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of the National Doping Control Centre in Bangkok, Thailand (the Laboratory), for a period of up to six months.

This suspension has been imposed on the Laboratory due to non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) as identified during a WADA site visit and subsequent follow-up of its routine activities.

In September 2019, WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) recommended the initiation of disciplinary proceedings against the Laboratory, which were subsequently carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee that was mandated to make a recommendation to the Chair of the WADA Executive Committee regarding the status of the Laboratory’s accreditation. This process is now complete.

The suspension, which took effect on 18 November 2019, prohibits the Laboratory from carrying out any anti-doping activities, including all analyses of urine and blood samples. During the period of suspension, relevant samples must be securely transported to another WADA-accredited laboratory for analysis, in accordance with the guidance provided in the ISL. This is in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis, which also helps preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

Pursuant to Article 13.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the Laboratory may appeal this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days of receipt of notice.

During the period of suspension, the Laboratory shall address all non-conformities identified by WADA in any request for corrective action or otherwise, as well as any additional non-conformities identified during any follow-up WADA site visit during the suspension period. If the Laboratory satisfies WADA in meeting these requirements, it may apply for reinstatement prior to the expiry of the six-month suspension period. Should the Laboratory not address the non-conformities by the end of the six-month suspension period, WADA may extend the suspension of the Laboratory’s accreditation for up to an additional six months.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


18/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES NEW AND REVISED
TECHNICAL LETTERS

Montreal, 18 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces the publication of the following Technical Letters, which were approved by the Agency’s Executive Committee on 4 November 2019 and are required to be implemented with immediate effect by all WADA-accredited laboratories:

TL21: in situ formation of 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione (6-oxo) and metabolites (new)
This new Technical Letter includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of findings for 6-oxo and metabolites, which may result in urine samples from the in-situ transformation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

TL08: Use of Internal Standards (revised)
This revised version of TL08 reintroduces an explanatory sentence at the beginning of Section 3 – Additional Recommendation for Qualitative Confirmation Procedures. However, since the technical content has not changed from TL01/2017 (version 2.0), the effective date remains the same as said version.

TL19: Prednisone and Prednisolone (revised)
This revised version of TL19 rectifies a typographical error in the second paragraph (page 1), and now properly refers to TL10 instead of TL09.

About Technical Letters

WADA publishes Technical Letters on an ad-hoc basis in order to provide instruction and guidance to WADA-accredited laboratories, WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport and other stakeholders on particular issues related to the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures. Technical Letters are modified and/or withdrawn by WADA as deemed appropriate.

The Technical Letters constitute a WADA laboratory standard document which supersedes any previous publication on a similar topic and becomes an integral part of the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL).

A Technical Letter shall be applied to samples which are received by the Laboratory on and after the Technical Letter’s effective date.

Should you have any questions regarding the above Technical Letters, we kindly invite you to contact WADA’s Science Department at science@wada-ama.org. Should you wish to consult previously issued Technical Letters, they are available and indexed on WADA’s website.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


18/11/19 WADA UPDATE REGARDING RUSADA
CODE COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 18 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that WADA’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) met yesterday, 17 November, to consider a report from the Agency’s Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) and independent forensic experts and, accordingly, to discuss the ongoing compliance procedure brought against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

In line with the process, the CRC will now bring a formal recommendation to the WADA Executive Committee (ExCo), under the chairmanship of WADA President Sir Craig Reedie whose term of office runs until 31 December 2019. The ExCo is scheduled to meet on 9 December to discuss the recommendation.

The WADA I&I report was based on its assessment of a number of inconsistencies found in some of the data that was retrieved by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. This assessment included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions, including follow-up questions, raised by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts.

These questions gave RUSADA and the Russian Ministry of Sport an opportunity to explain the inconsistencies, as part of WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA.

WADA continues to pursue this matter robustly and as quickly as practicable, while ensuring that due process is respected, as outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.

Meanwhile, as previously outlined, the 47 cases that were sent by WADA in July to a number of International Federations for action were based on data that were unaffected by these inconsistencies. Accordingly, those cases can proceed without delay, and more such cases will follow in due course.


13/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES VIDEOS CELEBRATING ITS 20TH ANNIVERSARY

Montreal, 13 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish a video celebrating its 20th anniversary leading a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport, which was premiered during the Agency’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport in Katowice, Poland from 5-7 November. The video features a number of WADA’s external and internal stakeholders speaking of how WADA came about, its leaders, its progress and its challenges.
 
The Agency also wishes to share two other videos, which feature athletes and other stakeholders wishing WADA a happy 20th anniversary:

  1. Athletes
  2. Other stakeholders

Addressing the over 1,500 World Conference participants last week, WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “It is remarkable to think of how far WADA and, by extension, the global anti-doping program has come over these two decades. With the energy of everyone – athletes, governments, sports, laboratories, National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, and all those interested in the integrity of sport – I have no doubt that WADA will continue to be at the forefront of protecting clean sport for the next 20 years and far beyond.”
 
The anti-doping movement, as we know it today, was the result of crises in sport; in particular, the Festina cycling scandal back in 1998. At the time, there was no one answer to tackling doping. Every sport had different rules and countries had different laws so an athlete could, for example, be banned in one country or sport but be able to compete in others. Accordingly, doping started to be seen as the most serious threat to the values of sport.
 
In February 1999, the first World Conference on Doping in Sport brought together all parties involved in Lausanne; and, resulted in the Lausanne Declaration on Doping in Sport. This document provided for the creation of an independent international anti-doping agency to be operational for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia.
 
Pursuant to the terms of the Lausanne Declaration, WADA was established on 10 November 1999 to promote and coordinate the fight against doping in sport internationally; and, started operating later that year as a unique 50-50 partnership between the Sports Movement and Governments of the world.
 
What followed quickly was the coming into force of the first version of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) in 2004, which is the fundamental and universal document upon which the World Anti-Doping Program is based. It harmonizes anti-doping policies, rules and regulations within sport organizations and among public authorities around the globe. The Code works in conjunction with International Standards that aim to foster consistency among anti-doping organizations in areas such as: testing; laboratories; Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs); the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods; the protection of privacy and personal information; Code Compliance by Signatories; and, effective January 2021, results management; and, education.  
 
In parallel, in 2005, the UNESCO Convention Against Doping in Sport was adopted, which is the practical instrument by which governments formalize their commitment to the fight against doping. It allows governments to align their domestic policies with the Code, thus harmonizing the rules governing anti-doping in sport and public legislation. The Convention is now ratified by 188 countries, covering around 99% of the world’s population.
 
Last week’s World Conference concluded with WADA’s Foundation Board approving the fourth version of the Code and the Agency’s Executive Committee approving the International Standards. All these documents will come into force on 1 January 2021.


13/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES TECHNICAL DOCUMENT FOR LABORATORY DOCUMENTATION PACKAGES

Montreal, 13 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces the publication of the Technical Document for Laboratory Documentation Packages (TD2019LDOC), which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee on 4 November 2019; and, is required to be implemented by all WADA-accredited laboratories with immediate effect.

The revised TD2019LDOC replaces the former TD2017LDOC (version 2) and includes clarification on the quality control samples required for Documentation Packages in Appendix E: Blood Athlete Biological Passport (ABP). In addition, some definitions have been updated for consistency with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) version 10.0.

Should you have any questions regarding the above Technical Document, we kindly invite you to contact WADA’s Science Department at science@wada-ama.org. Should you wish to consult previously issued Technical Documents, they are available and indexed on WADA’s website.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


7/11/19 WADA’S WORLD CONFERENCE ‘DECLARATION’ CALLS ON ALL STAKEHOLDERS TO UNITE AGAINST DOPING

Katowice, 7 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport concluded today in Katowice, Poland with WADA’s Foundation Board approving the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and the Executive Committee (ExCo) approving the International Standards. All these documents will come into force on 1 January 2021.

Katowice Declaration

Following these approvals, a ‘Katowice Declaration’ called upon “all stakeholders in the fight against doping in sport, including the Sports Movement, Governments, Anti-Doping Organizations and athletes to reinforce their efforts to strengthen their cooperation in every possible way; to present a unified front to strive to eradicate doping in sport; to increase resources dedicated to protecting clean sport; and to bring all perpetrators to account, without limitation.”

In December 2017, WADA initiated a transparent revision process which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code; two for the related International Standards and one for the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act, previously known as the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to further strengthen the global anti-doping program.

The Board congratulated Beckie Scott, the Chair of WADA’s Athlete Committee, and WADA Athlete Committee member Ben Sandford, the document’s lead drafter, along with the other members of the Committee on the approval of the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act by the ExCo the day prior. The Board acknowledged a two-and-a-half-year effort by the Committee, which involved consultation with thousands of athletes and stakeholders around the world. The purpose of the Act, which is based on the 2021 Code and Standards, is to ensure that athlete rights within anti-doping are clearly set out, accessible, and universally applicable.

Election of WADA President and Vice-President

The Board elected former elite runner and Poland’s Minister for Sport and Tourism, Witold Bańka, as the next WADA President and double Olympic gold-medalist in short-track speed skating, Yang Yang, as Vice-President – an election that will place athletes in the top two leadership roles in WADA when they officially take office on 1 January 2020.

After the election, Witold Bańka said: “It is a huge honor for me to become President of WADA. I know how important the Agency is for the future of sport and I will work hard to ensure that it continues to lead a global anti-doping program that holds up the values of clean sport at all times. I pledge my commitment to putting the athletes’ interests first so they can have confidence that WADA will always support them to compete clean. Whatever happens, I will always come back to that. I know we will face many challenges in the years ahead. We have a difficult task before us and we will sometimes have to make difficult decisions. Yet, I am convinced we will be able to make them. Together, we will work tirelessly to make the sports world cleaner and safer and something that continues to inspire millions of people around the world.”

Yang Yang said: “I am very honored to be elected to this important position. As a former athlete, I have a strong passion for sport and I truly believe in the fight against doping and the need to protect the rights of clean athletes. Together with Minister Bańka I am very confident that we can make a real difference and I am looking forward to starting this work, so that there can be a bright future for sport.”

Today was also an opportunity for the anti-doping movement to recognize the contributions of outgoing President Sir Craig Reedie; as well as, a number of other Executive Committee and Foundation Board members and Standing Committee Chairs that will step down at the end of this year. Like most sporting bodies, WADA’s talented and dedicated volunteers are the backbone of the Agency. Without their engagement, the Agency and Clean Sport would simply not advance.

Founding President, Richard Pound, who led WADA from its inception in 1999 until 2007, was one of many colleagues that paid tribute to Sir Craig as he prepares to leave office. Richard Pound said: “Sir Craig is someone who has given up his time and experience voluntarily over many years. He has led WADA for six years and at the end of Craig’s tenure, WADA is a better organization than it was when he took office. We have a stronger regulatory framework, a world-class intelligence and investigations operation, we are funding scientific research and development and we have a significantly increased budget. Craig should take satisfaction that he leaves a stronger WADA than he inherited and I think we should all thank him for that.”

Sir Craig, who will step down as President at the end of 2019, said: “I have been involved with WADA since the start 20 years ago and I have seen it grow into the highly effective organization that it is today. It has been my privilege to lead the Agency for the past six years, through what have been challenging times. In that time, I have seen WADA grow and strengthen considerably. I wish Minister Bańka and Yang Yang every success as they take over the reins. It is a telling sign that both the new President and Vice-President are former elite athletes who no doubt will bring athletes’ voices and perspectives forward.”

The Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act

During the Board, WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, responded to Board members’ questions regarding WADA Management’s position on the Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act, which is currently making its way through the United States Congress. Olivier Niggli clarified that WADA Management broadly welcomed the Act as it did with other Governmental efforts to pass legislation that strengthens anti-doping. He added that more than half the members of the Board, representing both the Sports Movement and Governments, had previously expressed reservations with the extra-territoriality aspect of the Act and had instructed WADA Management to seek clarification on any possible unintended consequences it may bring from the relevant Government officials in Washington D.C. He undertook to continue updating the Board so that members could be kept up to date on developments.

RUSADA Compliance Procedure

As he did at the 4 November ExCo meeting, the Chair of the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC), Jonathan Taylor, updated the meeting on the latest progress being made as regards the compliance procedure taken against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) in relation to inconsistencies WADA detected in the data collected from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. Jonathan Taylor confirmed that a CRC meeting to discuss the experts report was scheduled for 17 November. Should the CRC issue a recommendation, the ExCo will meet as soon thereafter as practicable to consider the recommendation.

WADA Governance

In a significant step forward in the ongoing process of strengthening WADA’s governance structure, the Board adopted the first set of legal documents which will enable implementation of a good portion of the governance reforms agreed by the Board in November 2018. At the May 2020 Board meeting, a small expert group will be proposed to monitor the effective implementation of these reforms and to formulate proposals for future reforms to ensure WADA governance remains fit for purpose.

2020 Budget

The Board approved the WADA budget for 2020, which will be USD 37,444,738, representing an 8% increase compared to 2019.

About the World Conference

The World Conference, which ran from 5-7 November, took stock of the evolution of Clean Sport with stakeholders engaging in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program. It brought together more than 1,500 representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media.


6/11/19 WADA’S WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT FOCUSES ON STRENGTHENED RULES’ BENEFITS TO ATHLETES

Katowice, 6 November 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) World Conference on Doping in Sport – being held from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland – primarily focused on the International Standards of the global anti-doping program, which will be put before WADA’s Executive Committee tomorrow for approval. A Conference session was devoted to each Standard with experts on hand to explain some of the technicalities of each and the positive impact that they will have on clean sport.

The comprehensive suite of Standards – which includes two new ones related to results management and education – covers the topics of testing and investigations, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, the Prohibited List, laboratories, data protection, and Signatory compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code). Once approved, all the Standards will enter into force on 1 January 2021, with the exception of the List that is updated annually.

In December 2017, WADA initiated a very transparent revision process which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code and two for the related International Standards. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to strengthen the global anti-doping rules.

The new International Standard for Results Management seeks to make cases of suspected doping more harmonized, fair, efficient and timely so that athletes are treated the same regardless of their sport or country, while the International Standard for Education will further enable Signatories to consider those in their sporting landscape who would benefit from education, plan how to reach them, provide education opportunities for them to access and then gather feedback for improvements.

WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “In conjunction with the Code, the International Standards underpin the entire global anti-doping program and have proven over time to be highly effective. In order for them to remain robust, they need to evolve and adapt to the changing landscape. Through the comprehensive consultation process that has led up to this point, we received a huge number of comments and contributions from stakeholders, the result of which is stronger regulations that will protect athletes and clean sport further.”

During the afternoon, WADA Athlete Committee Chair Beckie Scott and member Ben Sandford presented the latest draft of the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act – previously known as the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights. The purpose of this document is to ensure that athlete rights within anti-doping are clearly set out, accessible, and universally applicable. Beckie Scott and Ben Sandford took Conference participants through the Act’s two-year evolution, detailed its contents and addressed questions and comments raised by the Conference participants. The Act will be considered along with the International Standards by WADA’s Executive Committee tomorrow.

Another athlete-focused highlight of the day was a session that featured the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC’s) ‘Take the Podium’ program, which is a medal reallocation program launched in 2018 upon the recommendation of the IOC’s Athlete Commission. Many athletes have had medals taken away from them in the years following an Olympic Games or other major events after re-analysis of stored doping control samples by the IOC and other anti-doping organizations revealed the presence of prohibited substances or methods thanks to new or improved detection methods. The IOC has implemented a program that looks to give those athletes who were cheated out of medals at Olympic Games, their moment of glory and recognition.

Moderated by Danka Bartekova, Vice President of the IOC Athlete Commission and a member of WADA’s Athlete Committee and Executive Committee, the session focused on British javelin thrower Goldie Sayers and Polish hammer thrower Anita Wlodarczyk – both who joined Danka Bartekova on the stage to share their experience with the representatives of the anti-doping community gathered in Katowice.

Sir Craig Reedie said: “Individual cases like Goldie’s and Anita’s inspire us. This Conference is mostly discussing the rules – the Code and the Standards. Those debates can seem a little abstract or even dull at times but it is wonderful when those rules that have extended the statute of limitations to ten years and enabled re-analysis programs, make a meaningful positive difference in the lives of athletes. That is why we are here – to serve them. It sends a clear message that we will not stop seeking justice for those who have been cheated and that we will always stand beside the athletes who choose to compete clean.”

At the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, Goldie Sayers was denied a bronze medal by an athlete who was subsequently shown to have doped. Eleven years later, she received her rightful prize from Sir Craig Reedie, in front of her home crowd at an international athletics event in London.

Sayers said: “Sport has definitely shaped me as a person. It has taught me that you can achieve a lot more than you can imagine. When I was being presented with the medal in London, I stood at the back of the podium and said to myself ‘just take it all in, take it all in’, and then I got really, really emotional. Receiving my medal the way I did was, of course, not how I dreamed it would be but it is important that athletes receive justice, no matter how long that takes.

“It’s a great privilege to give an athlete’s perspective on the medal re-allocation process and what it means to have justice finally served. The retesting program is an important aspect of anti-doping and I want to thank all those dedicated people who work hard for clean sport, people who made it possible for this to happen.”

Speaking directly to the audience, she added: “Sometimes in anti-doping you feel it’s a bit of an uphill battle, that nobody is grateful. But cases like mine show that it is worth it and I know that athletes really do value the anti-doping movement. You are all incredibly important and we need you. Please keep on fighting the fight.”

In London 2012, Anita Wlodarczyk came second behind an athlete who was later disqualified as part of the IOC re-analysis program. Two weeks ago, at a special ceremony at the Grand Theatre in Warsaw, she received her gold medal from IOC President Thomas Bach.

Wlodarczyk said: “At the time, in 2012, when I came second at the London Olympics, I was very happy because my biggest dream was to win an Olympic medal. I remember every detail of the ceremony and I was very proud to win a medal for Poland. But five years later, I received the news that the athlete who came first was caught for doping through re-analysis. The IOC informed me of the official decision and asked me where and when I would like to receive the gold medal.

“It was such a thrill and I was very happy to receive the medal here in Poland during a special gala celebration of the centenary of the Polish Olympic Committee. It meant a lot to me. I am very happy to have two gold Olympic medals now. Ultimately, it is the clean athletes who are cheated when other athletes take performance-enhancing drugs. I heard here at the World Conference about new methods of doping control and I am very happy that WADA is helping to protect athletes and always looking to improve the system.”

The World Conference is taking stock of the evolution of Clean Sport with stakeholders engaging in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program. It has brought together more than 1,500 representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media.


5/11/19 CLEAN SPORT COMMUNITY EXPRESSES SUPPORT FOR 2021 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE ON FIRST DAY OF WADA’S FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Katowice, 5 November 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport opened in Katowice, Poland; which, from 5-7 November, is taking stock of the evolution of Clean Sport and engaging in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program.

Organized with the generous support of the Ministry of Sport and Tourism of Poland, the Conference has brought together over 1,500 representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media.

Coinciding with WADA’s 20th anniversary, the World Conference opened with a speech by WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, which was followed by speeches from the President of Poland, Andrzej Duda; the President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), Thomas Bach; the Minister of Sport and Tourism and incoming WADA President, Witold Bańka; the Chair of WADA’s ‘One Voice’ group of public authorities, Marcos Diaz; the Assistant Director-General for Social and Human Sciences at UNESCO, Nada Al-Nashif; and the Mayor of Katowice, Marcin Krupa.

The day focused on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code), which is set to be approved by WADA’s Foundation Board on 7 November and to enter into force on 1 January 2021. In December 2017, WADA initiated a very transparent revision process which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code and two for the related International Standards. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to strengthen the global anti-doping rules.

WADA stakeholders had the opportunity to intervene publicly on the current status of anti-doping and on the revised Code during the afternoon sessions. During these sessions, more than 30 Conference delegates from various categories of stakeholders offered their views. Most praised the latest draft version of the revised Code, highlighting its benefits for both athletes and anti-doping organizations worldwide, while also suggesting ways of how the anti-doping system could be further enhanced. There was strong recognition for 20 years of achievement by WADA, of challenges, but also of the need to further strengthen the Agency and the global anti-doping program for the benefit of clean athletes. More stakeholder interventions will follow tomorrow.

During his address, WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “WADA is maintaining the Code as a living document that adapts to the changing anti-doping landscape to ensure it remains fit for purpose. This third Code review in the Agency’s 20-year history has harnessed the practical experience of WADA and its stakeholders in order to strengthen the global harmonized fight against doping in sport.

“On 10 November, WADA will celebrate its 20th anniversary. It has been two decades of progress, improvement and, of course, plenty of complex challenges. It is remarkable to think of how far WADA and, by extension, the global anti-doping program has come. However, this is no time to be resting on our laurels as there will always be those who try to destabilize the anti-doping system. The key for WADA is to continue listening, learning and implementing ever more effective strategies and processes in collaboration with all our partners.”

In his speech, the IOC President commended the Agency and Sir Craig for the strides made in the anti-doping system. He pledged an additional IOC contribution to anti-doping of up to USD 10 million. These funds, he explained, would include: USD 5 million to finance long-term (up to 10-year) storage of the thousands of samples collected by anti-doping organizations during the pre-Olympic Games testing periods for later re-analysis, bringing that process into line with samples collected during the Games themselves; USD 2.5 million towards WADA’s science budget to build on the success of the ongoing research program, provided Governments of the world match that amount; and another USD 2.5 million to a joint program, with Governments, to further strengthen the successful work of WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department.

Having made this announcement, Thomas Bach said: “I invite all of you here today to join hands so that together we can accomplish the mission of WADA and together we can send a strong signal from Katowice to the athletes of the world, and to the general public – a signal of determination, a signal of cooperation, a signal of credibility.”

President Duda told the Conference: “Thanks to WADA’s work, I think more and more young people are staying away from doping. We must do all we can to ensure they are guided by honesty and integrity, reaching their goals with a clear conscience, with their heads held high and so that they never have to be ashamed because of what they did.”

The incoming WADA President, Witold Bańka, who is up for election by the Foundation Board (Board) on 7 November, spoke passionately about WADA and what clean sport means to him. “Sport is a beautiful idea that has the power to unite people no matter what their political views, religion, skin color or age. This idea must be protected. We have to prevent corrupting it. We must do everything we can to save this idea.”

Minister Banka mentioned funding as being a key element of ensuring WADA continues to move forward with the anti-doping program. He said: “I call upon global sports leaders and those who represent Governments, as well as private companies, that if they want sport to be clean, they need to increase their financial support for the fight against doping in sport. WADA needs you and your support, just like you need WADA.”

Picking up on some of the themes highlighted in his opening address, WADA’s President participated in the morning panel session two, which reflected on the 20-year history of the Agency while exploring perspectives on the direction and objectives of the future of anti-doping. The panel also included Munashe Dangare (a field hockey player from Zimbabwe), WADA Vice-President Linda Helleland, past Presidents Richard Pound (1999-2007) and John Fahey (2008-2013), and incoming President and Vice-President, Witold Bańka and Yang Yang.

The third session of the day explored a vision of the anti-doping community for the future and featured Arly Velasquez (Paralympic skier from Mexico), Yaya Yamamoto (Japan Anti-Doping Agency), Franz Schwarzenbacher (Criminal Intelligence Service of Austria), Christine Mugera (Africa Zone V Regional Anti-Doping Organization), Dr Peter Van Eenoo (Laboratory Director at the University of Ghent, Belgium) and Brett Clothier (Athletics Integrity Unit).

As outlined in the Conference program, the Conference will wrap up on 7 November with the Code being presented for approval by WADA’s Board and the International Standards being presented for endorsement by the Agency’s Executive Committee.

On the same day, the Board will elect WADA’s new President and Vice President. Minister Banka, who is also a former elite 400m runner is the candidate for President; and, China’s double Olympic gold-medal winning short-track speed skater, Yang Yang, is the Vice-Presidential candidate. Once elected, they will assume their roles on 1 January 2020.


4/11/19 WADA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TAKES A NUMBER OF DECISIONS AHEAD OF FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Katowice, 4 November 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Executive Committee (ExCo) met in Katowice, Poland. The 12-member ExCo is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and is composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments of the world.
 
The half-day meeting, which took place on the eve of WADA’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport (5-7 November), focused on a number of decisions and recommendations to the Foundation Board, which will meet on 7 November, concerning a range of topics. The main decisions are outlined in the summary below.
 
Reflecting on the day’s events, WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, said: “This week is an important one for WADA and the broader anti-doping community, and I am pleased with the discussions that the ExCo had on a number of key matters. As we head into the start of the World Conference tomorrow, it is clear that everyone is focused on ensuring significant outcomes that will strengthen the global anti-doping program in the interest of athletes worldwide.”

RUSADA Code Compliance
 
The ExCo heard an update from the Chair of the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC), Jonathan Taylor, on the compliance procedure currently underway against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA). WADA initiated the procedure following identification by the Agency’s Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) Department and by independent forensic experts of inconsistencies in the data retrieved by WADA I&I from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019.
 
As per WADA’s update of 28 October, the matter is being dealt with robustly and as quickly as practicable. Once the experts conclude their assessment, a report will be sent to the CRC to consider. Should the CRC make a recommendation regarding RUSADA’s compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), it will be sent to the ExCo for decision at a meeting to be held as soon as possible, in line with the process laid out in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.
 
Separately, an initial batch of 47 evidentiary packages, based on data unaffected by the inconsistencies, have been sent to the relevant international federations for them to bring cases forward. Concurrently, WADA I&I continues to build more evidentiary packages.
 
Social Science Research
 
The ExCo approved the recommendation of WADA’s Education Committee to fund eight social science research project grants totaling USD 332,841 under the 2020 Social Science Research Grant Program. The details of the newly approved projects will be made available under the Social Science Research section of WADA’s website in due course.

International Standard for Testing and Investigations
 
The ExCo approved amendments to the International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI), specifically related to the requirement for urine samples to meet a suitable specific gravity for analysis. The minimum volume of urine required for analysis will remain at 90ml but if an athlete can provide 150ml or more of urine, the minimum specific gravity measurement (using a refractometer) will be lowered to 1:003 or above instead of the current 1:005. The minimum 1:005 specific gravity requirement will remain in place for samples with a volume greater than 90ml but less than 150ml.
 
These changes, which were endorsed by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group, recognize significant enhancements in the sensitivity of laboratory analytical methods made over the past 20 years and will reduce the amount of time some athletes will have to spend in doping control stations, making the process more athlete-friendly while also presenting a saving in resources for anti-doping organizations.
 
The revised ISTI will be published shortly and the amendments will take effect on 1 March 2020. This is an exceptional approval, in advance of other changes to the Standard that will come into force on 1 January 2021, meaning these changes can be utilized during the Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo and during most of 2020.
 
Health, Medical and Research
 
The ExCo approved an application for candidate status from the Laboratorio Clinico Genetix located in Panama City, Panama, to become a laboratory approved for Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) analysis. The laboratory’s application for ABP-approved status will now go forward to the WADA Laboratory Expert Group that will evaluate whether its technical and analytical capabilities justify approval.
 
In addition, the ExCo gave approval to the following six WADA-accredited laboratories to manage Athlete Passport Management Units (APMUs):

  1. Beijing, China
  2. Doha, Qatar
  3. London, United Kingdom
  4. Montreal, Canada
  5. Rome, Italy
  6. Salt Lake City, USA

The APMU status, which confirms that these laboratories fulfill a number of quality and independence criteria, will allow the laboratories in question to drive essential anti-doping activities in relation to the ABP program. These six laboratories join the ten approved as APMUs by the ExCo at its 23 September meeting in Tokyo. 
 
World Conference
 
The three-day World Conference begins tomorrow with a packed program, filled with expert speakers from all aspects of the global anti-doping community, including athletes, scientists, investigators, lawyers, administrators, government officials and educators.
 
As outlined in the Conference program, this fifth World Conference will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards) that were subject of a two-year review process; and which, will be presented for discussion by stakeholders during the Conference. The week will wrap up on 7 November with the Code being presented for endorsement by WADA’s Foundation Board (Board) and the Standards being presented for endorsement by the ExCo.
 
On the same day, the Board will elect a new President and Vice-President, who will assume their roles on 1 January 2020. The candidate for President to replace Sir Craig Reedie is Poland’s Minister of Sport and Tourism and former elite 400m runner, Witold Bańka, while China’s double Olympic gold-medal winning short-track speed skater, Yang Yang, is the Vice-Presidential candidate to replace Linda Helleland of Norway.
 
As part of the week’s activities, attendees will be marking the 20th anniversary of WADA’s formation by recalling some of the Agency’s main achievements in its short history; and, identifying some of the main challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.


1/11/19 WADA WELCOMES CLEAN SPORT COMMUNITY IN POLAND FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 1 November 2019 – From 5-7 November, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) will welcome more than 1,500 representatives from the clean sport community to Katowice, Poland, for its fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, which coincides with the 20th anniversary of the Agency’s formation.

Organized with the generous support of the Ministry of Sport and Tourism of the Republic of Poland, the Conference will convene representatives from the sports movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media to take stock of the evolution of clean sport and engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program.

As outlined in the Conference program, this year’s World Conference will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards) that were subject of a two-year review process, and which will be presented for discussion by stakeholders during the Conference. The week will wrap up on 7 November with the Code being presented for endorsement by WADA’s Foundation Board (Board) and the Standards being presented for endorsement by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo).

On the same day, the Board will elect a new President and Vice-President, who will assume their roles on 1 January 2020. The candidate for President to replace Sir Craig Reedie is Poland’s Minister of Sport and Tourism and former elite 400m runner, Witold Bańka, while China’s double Olympic gold-medal winning short-track speed skater, Yang Yang, is the Vice-Presidential candidate to replace Linda Helleland of Norway.

Looking ahead to his final set of meetings as President, Sir Craig Reedie couldn’t help but reflect on 20 years of challenge, adjustment and growth for WADA.  

He said: “WADA was formed as a response to a widespread doping crisis and it has been at the forefront of protecting clean sport for two decades. Since the Agency’s formation, we have made huge strides in tackling the scourge of doping in sport and we continue to move forward positively on a range of fronts.

“It has been two decades of progress in the face of complex challenges. Founded in November 1999, WADA quickly collaborated with stakeholders and delivered the first edition of the Code in 2003 during the Second World Conference on Doping in Sport in Copenhagen. This was the first time in history that anti-doping rules were harmonized across sports and countries. International Standards were added in such key areas as the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, testing and investigations, accredited laboratories, data protection, and compliance.

“In parallel, WADA worked with the United Nations to help develop the UNESCO Convention Against Doping in Sport that provides public authorities with a legal framework through which they can address specific areas of doping that are outside the domain of the sports movement. The Convention was written in record time in 2005 and is now ratified by 188 countries, covering around 99% of the world’s population.

“At the time, WADA committed to ensuring that the Code would be a living document, subject to periodic review. In keeping with that commitment, the Board initiated two other stakeholder review processes that led to the 2009 and 2015 Codes. The purpose of revising the Code and Standards is to leverage WADA’s and stakeholders’ experience garnered through years of practical implementation in order to strengthen the global harmonized fight against doping in sport.

“Next week in Katowice, we gather together as a community to take stock of how far we have come, assess the current landscape and look ahead to shape the future of anti-doping in sport through the approval of the 2021 Code and Standards. Over the past 20 years — as a movement that includes athletes, governments, sports, laboratories, anti-doping organizations and others that are interested in clean sport — we have faced many challenges. This did not prevent us from making significant strides. We have come this far together and there is a lot more to do to ensure athletes can compete in a doping-free environment in all sports and all countries. Clearly, there will be more challenges ahead; and so, now more than ever, it is vitally important that we move the right way together for the benefit of athletes worldwide.”

The World Conference will include an impressive line-up of speakers and presenters, which includes athletes, lawyers, scientists, anti-doping experts, journalists, government officials and others as a range of topics will be discussed as part of the official program.


30/10/19 WADA STRESSES IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION DURING SEVENTH UNESCO CONFERENCE OF PARTIES

Paris, 30 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) incoming President, Witold Banka, and WADA’s Director General, Olivier Niggli [pictured], were in Paris, France, this week to take part in the seventh UNESCO Conference of Parties (Conference) that is being held from 29-31 October. The Conference, which is a statutory session that takes place on a bi-annual basis, addresses issues regarding the implementation of the International Convention against Doping in Sport (the Convention) and other anti-doping matters.

The Convention, which was adopted in 2005, is the legal instrument through which Governments formalize their commitment to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code). With 188 States that have endorsed it, representing more than 99% of the global population, the Convention is the second most successful in UNESCO history in terms of the extent of ratification post-adoption.

Education, expanding the global legislative framework and strengthening the anti-doping movement’s ties with law enforcement agencies around the world will be key ways in which the battle to protect clean sport will succeed, said Witold Banka in his speech.

“More and more, education is being identified as a priority in the protection of clean sport. The children of today will be the athletes, coaches, parents, teachers, doctors, anti-doping practitioners and Government ministers of tomorrow. We must expose them now to the values that will positively shape sport in the decades ahead. This is the foundation, not only for ethical sporting behavior but also for character development and good citizenship. We have a duty to help our young people learn this through values-based education programs,” he said.

“For me, it’s all about preserving, promoting and protecting. Together we can work to preserve the spirit of sport; to promote the values of clean sport that we are all so passionate about; and ultimately, we will protect the athletes and citizens we serve.”

“WADA is often asked if we support the introduction of legislation to combat doping in sport. For sure, the cooperation between Governments and sports bodies can be improved further and WADA favors governments using their legislative powers to protect clean athletes in the fight against doping. We particularly welcome legislative measures to facilitate the sharing of information between Anti-Doping Organizations and law enforcement agencies in areas of mutual interest and also when it comes to the protection of whistleblowers. We have seen the benefits of this policy recently with a number of successful investigations involving WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations team.”

On day two of the Conference, under the theme ‘The Right Way Together’, Olivier Niggli took delegates through some of WADA’s strategic priorities, in particular the development and implementation of the 2021 Code and associated International Standards, which will be discussed at WADA’s World Conference on Doping in Sport to be held from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland. He also addressed areas such as compliance monitoring, capacity building, education, intelligence and investigations, and ongoing management of the Russian doping issue.

In closing, WADA’s Director General made an appeal to States Parties that they make every effort to comply with the UNESCO Convention. He said: “While Governments are not Signatories to the Code, it is important that they meet the expectations of them set out in the Code or face meaningful consequences – just like athletes and Code Signatories do when they fall short of expectations.”

“Beyond this, Governments can certainly help curb the use of doping substances by strengthening the capacity of Anti-Doping Organizations, building awareness and offering more education and testing. They can also help curb the distribution of doping substances by strengthening legislation to allow for the sharing of information between law enforcement agencies and Anti-Doping Organizations, encouraging and protecting whistleblowers, and monitoring the distribution across borders.”

About the Conference of Parties

The Conference of Parties has overall responsibility for implementation of the Convention. Its objectives include:Monitoring compliance with the Convention;Examining and adopting amendments to the Convention; andDetermining how resources of the Fund for the Elimination of Doping in Sport will be used.In addition to States Parties and other Member States of UNESCO, WADA is invited as an advisory organization to the Conference. The International Olympic Committee, the International Paralympic Committee, the Council of Europe, the Intergovernmental Committee for Physical Education and Sport, and other intergovernmental sports organizations are also invited as observers.


30/10/19 WADA AND PARTNERS LAUNCH “SPORT VALUES IN EVERY CLASSROOM” EDUCATION TOOLKIT

Paris, 30 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce the launch of the “Sport Values in Every Classroom” education toolkit, that took place yesterday during the Seventh UNESCO Conference of Parties (COP), which is being held from 29-31 October in Paris, France.

The toolkit, which is a free, cross-curricular resource targeted at teachers of students aged 8-12 years old, was developed in partnership by the following international organizations: WADA; the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); the Agitos Foundation; the International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE); the International Fair Play Committee (IFPC); and, the Olympic Foundation for Cultural Heritage (OFCH). It was based on commissioned research conducted by a team associated with the International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP).

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA is proud to unveil this new education toolkit and would like to thank all the international partners involved in bringing this project to fruition. The development of this global resource for stakeholders truly demonstrates the value of international cooperation. We are pleased to see so many of our partners investing in values-based education.

“Education is a core component of our organization’s mission; and, is clearly mandated in the World Anti-Doping Code as an area in which our Signatories must deliver. This toolkit presents an opportunity for both Governments and Sports to implement values-based education programs, and we look forward to seeing its implementation worldwide.”

The toolkit is intended to complement the existing international curricula by promoting student engagement while helping teachers and other educators instill some of the core values that are synonymous with sport; such as: respect, equity and inclusion, all underpinned by the value of fairness.

The core of the toolkit is a set of 30 Activity Cards that act as complete lesson plans for teachers. These activities can be delivered in the classroom or in the gym, and support teachers in achieving many different curriculum requirements. The activities are engaging and fun even for a classroom setting and have been successfully delivered to children both younger and older than the target age group. The toolkit also includes a Quick Guide and a Teacher’s Companion, which provide academic support to those who seek extra guidance or ideas.

WADA Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “Research has shown that education is a leading strategy in the prevention of doping in sport. I am pleased to see the acknowledgement of a shared agenda between governments and sports in teaching core sports values to students and future athletes through early education.

“This values-based education toolkit is the result of key stakeholders in the international community coming together to provide a solution for a common agenda. For us, this toolkit supports our efforts to take a more balanced and modern approach to anti-doping, where prevention is a main driver and investing in the next generation is critical. We will work with our partners to promote this new education program as it is clear that good values support good citizens and good citizens can become great athletes.”

The toolkit is currently available in English – with more languages to follow soon – and can be downloaded from any of the participating partners’ websites.

For any questions related to the toolkit, please direct your emails to education@wada-ama.org.


28/10/19 WADA REMOVES MAURITIUS NATIONAL ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATION FROM NON-COMPLIANCE LIST

Montreal, 28 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that, following a circular vote of its Executive Committee (ExCo), the Agency removed on 24 October 2019 the Anti-Doping Unit of the Mauritius Ministry of Youth and Sports – the National Anti-Doping Organization of Mauritius – from the list of Signatories that are non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

The Anti-Doping Unit of the Mauritius Ministry of Youth and Sports was declared non-compliant by WADA’s ExCo at its meeting of 16 November 2017 due to non-compliant anti-doping legislation that was being used to enforce the Code. Since then, it has successfully implemented the corrective measures required to address its non-compliance, namely the adoption of legislation and related anti-doping regulations that are in line with the Code.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


28/10/19 WADA UPDATE REGARDING RUSADA
CODE COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 28 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) can confirm it has received further responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions, including follow-up questions, raised by WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) and the independent forensic experts concerning the data that WADA I&I retrieved from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019.

These questions gave the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) and the Russian Ministry of Sport an opportunity to explain a number of inconsistencies, as part of WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA.

The responses are currently being assessed by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts, who will report to the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) in due course so that the CRC is in a position to decide whether to bring a formal recommendation of non-compliance and proposed consequences to the WADA Executive Committee (ExCo).

Given the highly technical nature of this investigation and the volume of complex material being assessed, no fixed timeline can be set at this stage. However, at the moment, it is anticipated that the CRC will be in a position to consider WADA I&I’s report before the end of November. That being the case, the ExCo – under the chairmanship of WADA President Sir Craig Reedie whose term of office runs until 31 December 2019 – would meet as soon as possible thereafter to discuss any CRC recommendation.

WADA continues to pursue this matter robustly and as quickly as practicable, while ensuring that due process is respected, as outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.


25/10/19 WADA OUTLINES COMPOSITION OF INAUGURAL NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.

In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.


Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.
 
In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

  • Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
  • In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
  • Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.

Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.
 
In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

  • Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
  • In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
  • Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.

Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.
 
In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

  • Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
  • In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
  • Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.

21/10/19 WADA AND FONDS DE RECHERCHE DU QUÉBEC TO FUND THREE PROJECTS RESEARCHING THE USE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR ANTI-DOPING

Montreal, 21 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), in conjunction with the Fonds de recherche du Québec (FRQ), is pleased to announce funding for three projects that will explore the possible uses of artificial intelligence (AI) to advance the global anti-doping program.

Following a call for applications for targeted research on the application and impact of AI in the area of anti-doping, eight proposals were received and, after a period of careful assessment by WADA and FRQ, the successful projects were selected for funding.

WADA Senior Director, Sciences and International Partnerships, Dr Olivier Rabin, said: “AI is an exciting area to be explored and WADA believes there is enormous untapped potential for its use within anti-doping, particularly when it comes to the analysis of big data. In time, we think it could have a hugely positive impact. These three complementary projects will help shed some light on the extent of AI’s potential in the anti-doping context and we are pleased to be able to support what we hope will be important pieces of research.”

Chief Scientist of Québec, Dr. Rémi Quirion, said: “Montreal has become a world leader in the area of artificial intelligence and it is thrilled that WADA has decided to engage closely with the Québec research community in this field. It is hoped through these three projects that we will raise the understanding of the impacts that AI could have on the fight against doping, both technologically and socially. Multi-disciplinary collaborations such as these are ensuring that Québec researchers are at the center of international efforts in this field as they use their expertise to solve complex global problems.”

The first project, led by ‘Dataperformers’, a company that was founded in Montreal in 2013, will be carried out in collaboration with the WADA-accredited laboratory in Paris, known as the Département des analyses de l’Agence française de lutte contre le dopage. The one-year project will explore possible techniques for the analysis and application of AI to detect the use of prohibited substances or methods to circumvent anti-doping rules. If the results are promising, they will be compared with those obtained using traditional statistical methods, such as the adaptive model currently used for the Athlete Biological Passport.

The second project, led by the Montreal-based company ‘Element AI’, aims to quantify the risk of doping in athletes through the application of AI and, as a result, to develop a sampling and testing strategy based on proprietary algorithms. The project will be funded for a period of two years. 

The third project involves members of the ‘Centre for Genomics and Politics’ at McGill University in Montreal, supervised by Prof. Yann Joly. This study will use a qualitative approach to identify the perceptions of different stakeholders regarding the use of AI and its benefits in the context of anti-doping and to guide dialogue between WADA, other anti-doping organizations, athletes and the general public. The project will also be funded for a two-year period.

In May 2018, WADA and the FRQ signed a memorandum of understanding, which will yield CAD 2 million for anti-doping research. Specifically, the two organizations committed to contribute CAD 200,000 every year for five years (2018-22) in order to fund research projects relating to anti-doping, with the possibility of renewing the agreement beyond its initial five-year mandate.

About FRQ:
Reporting to the Minister of Economy, Science and Innovation, the Fonds de recherche du Québec strives to ensure the strategic and coherent development as well as the financial support of Québec research, establish the necessary partnerships to carry out their mission, and promote and support knowledge mobilization.


21/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES INDEPENDENT OBSERVER TEAM REPORT FROM 2019 EUROPEAN GAMES

Montreal, 21 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published its Independent Observer (IO) Team’s Report regarding the anti-doping program at the 2019 European Games held in Minsk, Belarus from 21-30 June 2019.

As it has done at a number of major events since 2000, WADA sent a team to monitor the anti-doping program that was run by the European Olympic Committees (EOC) with the aim of reinforcing confidence in athletes and the public as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of the Games’ anti-doping program.

In addition to collaboration with the EOC and providing general support prior to the Games, the team provided real-time feedback to the EOC designed to optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of the program in compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards.

Led by Hamish Coffey from UK Anti-Doping (UKAD), the four-person team was composed of international experts in anti-doping who observed and provided feedback on all aspects of doping control. This included the implementation of general anti-doping policies and procedures; test distribution planning; implementation of the out-of-competition and in-competition testing programs; athlete selection and notification; Therapeutic Use Exemptions procedures; sample collection procedures; the transport of samples and their chain of custody; and the results management process, including hearings that were held during the IO Team’s presence.

IO Team Chair, Hamish Coffey said: “The anti-doping program implemented at the 2nd European Games was comprehensive, robust and risk-based, and on behalf of the IO Team I would like to commend the EOC and the Minsk European Games Organizing Committee (MEGOC) for their efforts in protecting the rights of clean athletes and protecting the integrity of the event. In this report, the IO Team have highlighted the strengths of the program, as well as recommendations for the EOC to consider for future editions of the Games, as this event continues to grow and evolve. The IO Team extends our thanks to the EOC and MEGOC for their openness and collaboration before, during and after the Games.”

As is the case following all IO Team missions, the report includes a number of recommendations for the EOC and WADA itself – all designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future Games.


18/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES PROPOSED DRAFTS OF THE 2021 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE AND
INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Montreal, 18 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the following proposed drafts of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards), which will be presented for discussion by stakeholders during the Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, taking place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland; and, presented for endorsement respectively by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) – as relates to the Standards – and Foundation Board (Board) – as relates to the Code – at the conclusion of the Conference on 7 November 2019.

  1. 2021 World Anti-Doping Code
  2. International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS)
  3. International Standard for Laboratories (ISL)
  4. International Standard for the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information (ISPPPI)
  5. International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI)
  6. International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE)
  7. International Standard for Education (ISE) (New)
  8. International Standard for Results Management (ISRM) (New)

In December 2017, WADA initiated the 2021 Code Review Process, which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code and two for the Standards; during which, stakeholders received successive draft revisions; and, their feedback and recommendations were fed back to the eight distinct drafting teams. All successive drafts were published on WADA’s website.

WADA Management is confident that the Review Process, which was reported upon on multiple occasions to WADA’s ExCo and Board, was extensive and transparent – ensuring that all stakeholders had the opportunity to contribute to the practical improvement of the global anti-doping program. For the Code Review alone, the drafting team held 123 meetings and received over 2,000 comments. The Agency is grateful to all the stakeholders for their high-quality feedback; and to the drafting teams that have delivered on this momentous effort that will result in greater protection for Clean Sport.

Legal Opinion regarding the 2021 Code

WADA is also pleased to publish the French version of a Legal Opinion by Judge Jean-Paul Costa, former President of the European Court of Human Rights. Judge Costa rendered his opinion on the 2021 Code, in his capacity as consultant to WADA. His opinion refers to the compatibility of proposed new measures in the Code with international standards relating to human rights and his comments were incorporated within the proposed draft. [The English version will be posted to WADA’s website next week.]

Development and Implementation Guide for Stakeholders

To assist Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the Code and the Standards, at a later date, WADA will implement a 2021 Code Stakeholder Support Program; and, will work in collaboration with its partners. The aim of the Support Program is to provide simplified guidance for Signatories on what is required by 1 January 2021 when the 2021 Code comes into effect.

In the meantime, we are pleased to provide a Development and Implementation Guide for Stakeholders which touches upon the Support Program and summarizes other matters of importance related to the Review Process; in particular:

  • the significant changes between the current 2015 Code and the proposed Code;
  • the significant changes between the current Standards and the proposed Standards; and
  • a summary of the key topics being addressed in the new Standards.

Should you have any questions in the lead up to the World Conference, please feel free to contact: code@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


15/10/19 WADA DECLARES THE INTERNATIONAL TAEKWON-DO FEDERATION NON-COMPLIANT WITH
WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE

Montreal, 15 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF) is now officially non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

[Please note that ITF is not the World Taekwondo Federation (World Taekwondo), which is the Olympic Federation for the sport of Taekwondo. ITF is a Signatory to the Code but is not recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) or the Global Association of International Sports Federations (GAISF)*.]

As communicated on 23 September 2019, following its meeting in Tokyo, Japan, WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), agreed to follow the recommendation of the Agency’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) to assert ITF as non-compliant with the Code due to ITF’s failure to report to WADA on compliance by completing and submitting its Code Compliance Questionnaire (CCQ).

Under Article 10.3.1 of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS), ITF had 21 days following the date of receipt of the formal notice of non-compliance (23 September 2019) to dispute WADA’s assertion of non-compliance, as well as the proposed consequences and/or the reinstatement conditions proposed by the Agency.

As ITF did not dispute WADA’s assertion of non-compliance, nor the consequences of non-compliance and/or the reinstatement conditions proposed by WADA within 21 days from the date of the formal notice, the assertion of non-compliance is deemed admitted. Furthermore, the consequences of non-compliance and the reinstatement conditions proposed by WADA in the formal notice are deemed accepted, and the formal notice is now a final decision.

As decided by WADA’s ExCo, the consequences applied to the present case in accordance with Article 11 and Annex B.3.1 of the ISCCS are the following:

(a) ITF will lose its WADA Privileges until Reinstatement (see ISCCS Art B.3.1(a)), i.e.: 

  • In accordance with the relevant provisions of WADA’s Statutes, ITF’s Representatives shall be ineligible to hold any WADA office or any position as a member of any WADA board or committee or other body (including but not limited to membership of WADA’s Foundation Board, the Executive Committee, any Standing Committee, and any other committee).
  • ITF shall be ineligible to host any event hosted or organized or co-hosted or co-organized by WADA.
  • ITF’s Representatives shall be ineligible to participate in any WADA Independent Observer Program or WADA Outreach program or other WADA activities.
  • ITF shall not receive any WADA funding (either directly or indirectly) relating to the development of specific activities or participation in specific programs. 

(b) ITF’s Representatives shall be ineligible to sit as members of the boards or committees or other bodies of any Signatory (or its members) or association of Signatories for a period of one year or until ITF is reinstated (whichever is longer) (see ISCCS Art B.3.1 (c)). 

(c) ITF’s Representatives, as well as the Athletes and Athlete Support Personnel participating in its sport (or in one or more disciplines of that sport) will be excluded from participation in or attendance at (…) any multisport Event for the next edition of that Event (summer or winter, where relevant) or until Reinstatement (whichever is longer) (see ISCCS Art B.3.1 (e)).

WADA continues to provide guidance and support to ITF to solve its non-conformity.

Should you have any questions on this matter, please do not hesitate to contact us at compliance@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency 

*There are currently three Code Signatory International Federations for the sport of Taekwon-Do – the World Taekwondo Federation (World Taekwondo) and two other International Federations called “International Taekwon-do Federation”. The non-compliant International Federation is the ITF based in Austria. The two International Federations called “International Taekwon-do Federation” became Signatories to the Code prior to the adoption by WADA’s Executive Committee of a policy setting the conditions to be fulfilled by new organizations that wish to become Signatories.


15/10/19 FINAL DEADLINE TO REGISTER FOR WADA’S FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 15 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that the final deadline to register participants for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport – taking place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland – is this Friday, 18 October

PARTICIPANT AND ATHLETE REGISTRATION

Under the participation terms of the World Conference, organizations are permitted to register a pre-determined number of delegates for the event. This year, in order to encourage athlete participation, the Agency is inviting organizations to register one athlete as a delegate on top of their allotment listed on the Conference website. With over 1,200 participants already registered, WADA strongly encourages stakeholders to register as soon as possible in order to secure their participation.

For further information on allotments and to register participants and/or athletes by the deadline of 18 October 2019, please consult the Conference website that contains all relevant information, including: the program; the goals and objectivesintervention registration and submissionparticipation terms; and a preliminary list of confirmed speakers.

INTERVENTION SUBMISSION

As it has done at previous World Conferences, WADA will once again offer delegates the opportunity to intervene publicly during the Conference Plenary Sessions related to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

Please note that only delegates can publicly intervene and that priority will be given to those that registered their requests prior to the Conference.

To submit interventions

Delegates who registered their intervention by the 4 October 2019 deadline are strongly encouraged to provide an advance copy of their written document in English and/or French via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 21 October 2019.

Written documents should be a maximum of two A4 (or letter size) pages in length (approximately 400-500 words).

All documents will be posted on the Conference website as soon as possible after the relevant session.

While non-delegate participants are welcome to submit a written contribution, the Agency will not be able to accommodate these submissions with an intervention slot during the Conference Plenary Sessions.

Should you have any questions regarding the Conference, including queries relating to registration, accommodation and transport, please consult the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


11/10/19 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION REGARDING TECHNICAL LETTER ON IN-SITU FORMATION OF 4-ANDROSTENE-3,6,17-TRIONE (6-OXO) AND METABOLITES

Montreal, 11 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites stakeholders to participate in a consultation process regarding the following amended Technical Letter (TL):

  1. TL-21: in-situ formation of 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione (6-oxo) and metabolite

    This TL was updated following a consultation process initiated on 22 August; therefore, it is considered that a second consultation is necessary as it relates to the revised version that resulted.

    The TL includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of 6-oxo and metabolites in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The main updates are related to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) testing and reporting recommendations based on the detected levels of the major 6-oxo metabolite, i.e. 6α-hydroxyandrostenedione.

Stakeholders are invited to review this Technical Letter and provide comments by 20 October 2019, using WADA’s online consultation platform WADAConnect.

Under the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), WADA’s Technical Letters provide specific direction to WADA-accredited laboratories; WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport; and, other stakeholders on particular issues regarding the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures.

For any questions related to the above, we invite you to contact science@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


08/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES THREE NEW TECHNICAL LETTERS

Montreal, 8 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces the publication of the following new Technical Letters (TL) which were approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) at its meeting on 23 September 2019 in Tokyo, Japan:

TL-18: in-situ formation of testolactone

This new TL includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of possible detection of testolactone in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of DHEA.

TL-19: in-situ formation of prednisone and prednisolone

This new TL includes clarification regarding the possible detection of prednisone and/or prednisolone in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of cortisone and cortisol, respectively.

TL-20: in-situ formation of specific substances with a steroid structure

This new TL includes clarification regarding the possible detection of Prohibited Substances with a steroid structure in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of endogenous steroids.

All WADA-accredited Laboratories are kindly requested to implement these three new Technical Letters with immediate effect.

About Technical Letters

WADA publishes Technical Letters on an ad-hoc basis in order to provide instruction and guidance to the WADA-accredited Laboratories, WADA-approved Laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport and other stakeholders on particular issues related to the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific Laboratory procedures. Technical Letters are modified and/or withdrawn by WADA as deemed appropriate.

The Technical Letters constitute a WADA Laboratory standard document which supersedes any previous publication on a similar topic and becomes an integral part of the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), and therefore the described technical recommendations are mandatory and shall be implemented as soon as possible after approval by WADA’s ExCo and publishing on WADA’s website.

A Technical Letter shall be applied to samples which are received by the Laboratory on and after the Technical Letter’s effective date.

Previously issued Technical Letters are available and indexed on WADA’s website.

Should you have any questions regarding the above Technical Letters, we kindly invite you to contact WADA’s Science Department at science@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


04/10/19 WADA ANNOUNCES PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND NADO/RADO RELATIONS TEAM

Montreal, 4 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to update its stakeholders about recent structural and staff changes in its Program Development and National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO)/Regional Anti-Doping Organization (RADO) Relations (PDNRR) team.

In January 2019, a ‘stand-alone’ PDNRR Department was established within WADA. While the activities of this Department have been an integral part of WADA’s strategic priorities for years, they were previously combined with the Agency’s Education activities. After careful review, WADA recognized the increasing importance of these critical activities; and, as a result, decided to separate Education and PDNRR into stand-alone Departments. Since this time, the new Director of PDNRR, Tom May, has been busy staffing the Department; and, in cooperation with WADA’s Regional Offices in Cape Town, Lausanne, Montevideo and Tokyo, revising the overall strategy for the NADO and RADO programs.

With the staffing of the PDNRR Department now complete, we are pleased to announce the team that will further develop and implement this strategy in collaboration with WADA’s partners:

  1. Mr. Tom May – Director
    • Responsible for overall activities of the Department and the development, implementation and monitoring of WADA’s RADO and NADO relations strategies;
    • Facilitates the work of WADA’s NADO Advisory Group.
       
  2. Ms. Ieva Lukosiute-Stanikuniene – Senior Manager
    • Responsible for implementation of the NADO program strategy;
    • Supports activities of the Central Asia RADO, the Eastern Europe RADO and the Gulf States and Yemen RADO.
       
  3. Mr. Francisco Leon Cannock – Senior Manager
    • Responsible for implementation of the RADO program strategy;
    • Supports activities of the Caribbean RADO, the Central America RADO, the South America RADO and the Southeast Asia RADO.
       
  4. Ms. Michèle Mercier – Manager
    • Supports activities of the West Asia RADO, the Africa Zone I RADO, the Africa Zone II & III RADO and the Indian Ocean RADO.
       
  5. Ms. Ying Cui – Manager
    • Supports activities of the Africa Zone V RADO, the Africa Zone VI RADO, the South Asia RADO and the Oceania RADO.
       
  6. Ms. Caroline Hébert – Coordinator
    • Responsible for implementation of the RADO testing and staffing grants.
       
  7. Ms. Pascale Jean-François – Assistant
    • Provides support to all PDNRR Department activities.

Tom May stated: “With over 70 years of collective experience in anti-doping, I am confident that the Program Development and NADO/RADO Relations team, in collaboration with the Regional Offices, will deliver the necessary support that the NADO and RADO communities need. We look forward to ongoing collaboration with our stakeholders to ensure that all NADOs and RADOs are implementing effective anti-doping programs that are compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code and supporting athletes in the protection of clean sport. Reinforcing this area of activity responds to the demand by athletes that WADA ensures effective anti-doping programs in all countries and in all sports.” 

For further information regarding WADA’s Program Development and NADO/RADO Relations, please contact wada.program.development@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


03/10/19 WADA SUSPENDS ACCREDITATION OF
ATHENS LABORATORY

Montreal, 3 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of the Doping Control Laboratory of Athens, Greece for a period of up to six months.

This suspension has been imposed due to non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) as identified during a WADA site visit, including in relation to the lack of institutional support and investment for the laboratory.

In August 2019, disciplinary proceedings were initiated by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) and subsequently carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee, which was mandated to make a recommendation to the Chair of the WADA Executive Committee regarding the status of the laboratory’s accreditation. This process is now complete.

The suspension, which took effect on 1 October 2019, prohibits the laboratory from carrying out any anti-doping activities, including all analyses of urine and blood samples. During the period of suspension, relevant samples must be securely transported to another WADA-accredited laboratory for analysis, in accordance with the guidance provided in the ISL. This is in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis, which also helps preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

Pursuant to Article 13.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the laboratory may appeal this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days of receipt of notice.

During the period of suspension, the laboratory shall address all non-conformities identified by the LabEG or WADA in any request for corrective action or otherwise, as well as any additional non-conformities identified during any follow-up WADA site visit during the suspension period. If the laboratory satisfies the LabEG in meeting these requirements, it may apply for reinstatement prior to the expiry of the six-month suspension period. Should the laboratory not address the non-conformities by the end of the six-month suspension period, WADA may extend the suspension of the laboratory’s accreditation for up to an additional six months.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


03/10/19 WADA LEADS EXCITING COLLABORATION ON DRIED-BLOOD-SPOT TESTING

Montreal, 3 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that, over the past weeks, it has signed memoranda of understanding (MoUs) with seven Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) regarding the development and implementation of dried-blood-spot (DBS) testing. The Agency is collaborating with ADOs around the world to further research the development and implementation of this exciting method for drug testing in sport.
 
In March 2019, a meeting of various interested parties, including WADA, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the International Testing Agency (ITA) and a number of National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs) set up a steering committee to oversee the progress of this project with an objective of developing DBS testing for routine implementation in time for the 2022 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, China. An additional objective is to consider what aspects of DBS testing could potentially be implemented for the 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.
 
This steering committee, chaired by Dr. Marcia MacDonald, WADA Deputy Director, Science and Medicine, and including representatives from the IOC, ITA, the China Anti-Doping Agency (CHINADA) and the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), has appointed two working groups, one dealing with collection and transport, and the other focused on analysis and storage.
 
In leading this collaborative work, WADA has already invested USD 100,000 in the project and signed MoUs with the following organizations:

  • Antidoping Switzerland
  • Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority
  • CHINADA
  • IOC
  • ITA
  • Japan Anti-Doping Agency
  • USADA

A further objective of the project is to develop guidelines for the collection, transport, analysis and storage of DBS as well as to carry out research that may be required to achieve harmonization of practice in the anti-doping context.

In addition to the initial investment made by WADA and the above-mentioned parties, the Agency is soliciting contributions from other stakeholders and partners. Apart from financial contributions to this project and related research, NADOs and others have been encouraged to support the project in various other ways, including making additional administrative resources available.

WADA Senior Executive Director, Sciences and International Partnerships, Dr. Olivier Rabin said: “The possible advantages of DBS are clear. It has the potential to add to the current global anti-doping program by complementing existing urine and blood testing to expand upon the program’s testing coverage and capacity to better reveal doping practices. WADA is committed to making available new ways of protecting clean sport that reduce the inconvenience or discomfort for athletes and is easier, more effective and cheaper to carry out. In that way, it could be that DBS will be a major breakthrough in global anti-doping testing capacity.

“There is a real sense among project participants that DBS could be a game-changer for the anti-doping community. It is very encouraging how we are all working together on this project, optimizing time and resources, to validate this new element within the overall anti-doping toolbox. WADA is pleased to be able to lead this collective work and make its resources available to serve the team involved in this project.”

Potential advantages of DBS include:

  • Simplification of sample collection (e.g. a finger prick)
  • Less invasive than current methods of taking urine or blood samples so better for the athlete experience
  • The need for only a very small volume of blood for the test (depending on the type of analysis)
  • Less expensive to collect and transport DBS samples compared with current methods
  • Less space needed to store the samples
  • Potential benefits with regards to sample stability (less degradation)

All these advantages could allow testing authorities to target more athletes and collect more samples, including in some geographically remote areas. 

This project builds on the interest and research in DBS conducted by several ADOs and laboratories around the world. As with all new testing methods, solid validation phases are needed to ensure that routine application would add tangible and real benefits to the existing methods and protocols. Accordingly, WADA is funding a number of research projects in this area, in particular:


02/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2020 LIST OF PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES AND METHODS

Montreal, 30 September 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the 2020 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List); the 2020 Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2020 Monitoring Program. The List, which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) on 23 September 2019, comes into force on 1 January 2020.

The List, which is one of six International Standards that are mandatory for all Signatories of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), designates what substances and methods are prohibited both in- and out-of-competition, and which substances are banned in particular sports.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA is pleased to announce the publication of the 2020 Prohibited List. Updated annually, the List undergoes an extensive consultation period with a wide array of anti-doping stakeholders from around the globe. This is a very comprehensive process which aims to ensure that new substances and methods with doping potential – which are either currently on the market or in some cases still in clinical development – are included in the List. This helps us to protect not only the integrity of sport, but the health of athletes worldwide.”

The List is released three months ahead of it taking effect so that athletes and their entourage can acquaint themselves with any modifications. Ultimately, athletes are responsible for prohibited substances found in their body and prohibited methods found to have been used. Athlete entourage are also liable for Anti-Doping Rule Violations if determined to be complicit. Consequently, if there is any doubt as to the status of a substance or method, it is important that they contact their respective Anti-Doping Organization (International Federation or National Anti-Doping Organization) for advice.

The List’s annual revision process is led by WADA, beginning with an initial meeting in January and concluding with the publication of the List by 1 October. This is an extensive consultation process that includes WADA’s List Expert Group – composed of some of the most highly qualified experts in the world –  gathering information, including the latest scientific and medical research, trends, and intelligence gathered from law enforcement and pharmaceutical companies; circulating a draft List among stakeholders; taking their submissions into consideration; and revising the draft, followed by review by the Agency’s Health, Medical and Research (HMR) Committee. The HMR Committee then makes its recommendation to the WADA ExCo, which approves the List during its September meeting.

For a substance or method to be added to the List, it must be determined that it meets at least two of the following three criteria:

  1. It has the potential to enhance or enhances sport performance
  2. It represents an actual or potential health risk to the athletes
  3. It violates the spirit of sport

It should be noted that for athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method that is on the List, they may be accommodated if they meet the criteria outlined in the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE). The TUE process has overwhelming acceptance from athletes, physicians and anti-doping stakeholders worldwide.

Languages and Formats

The 2020 Prohibited List; the 2020 Summary of Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2020 Monitoring Program are available for download on WADA’s website in English and French with Spanish to follow shortly.

Stakeholders wishing to translate the List into other languages are kindly asked to signal their interest at info@wada-ama.org, by 31 October 2019. If interested, WADA would provide the necessary files and, once the translation is finalized, would make the List available on the Agency’s website.

The List’s mobile-friendly digital edition will go live on 1 January 2020.


01/10/19 WADA EDUCATION – HELPING ATHLETES WHO WANT TO COMPETE CLEAN

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to introduce ‘Spotlight’, a new communications tool that aims to inform stakeholders of the daily activities being carried out around the globe by the WADA team and its partners to deliver on Clean Sport. In this issue, we look at the priority area of education and how it fits into the broader anti-doping landscape.

Under the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), education is designed to preserve the spirit of sport from being undermined with the objective of preventing intentional or unintentional use of prohibited substances and methods. In line with this, WADA’s Education Department supports athletes that want to train and compete clean. In short, the Department aims to increase access to education and information programs worldwide for athletes and their support personnel; and, provides support, guidance and tools for athletes and stakeholders to help them create and implement education programs. Clean Sport education:is fundamentally based on the principle that athletes start in sport clean and that most athletes want to remain clean;is underpinned by social science research that helps us understand the complexities of doping behavior and supports our decision making;is a core component of any anti-doping program; andwill be strengthened via the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code review; in particular, through the introduction of a new International Standard for Education. WADA’s Education Team. From left to right: Tony Cunningham, Senior Manager; Amanda Hudson, Director and Kangeun Lee, Manager. 
Stakeholder call for increased research-led education

At WADA’s March 2019 Annual Symposium in Lausanne, Switzerland, stakeholders from the anti-doping community were asked to select which of WADA’s strategic priorities they believed would have the most positive impact on the global anti-doping program. The number-one answer was to ‘increase research-led education’.

This may come as a surprise to some given the higher public profile of other areas of the anti-doping program. The public focus, and indeed the anti-doping community itself, has tended towards catching cheats, which begs the question: what happens when virtually the only narrative around anti-doping is about those who have been caught doping versus those that compete clean?

Is it time to change the lens by which we view anti-doping? Should we focus more on the protection of clean sport and the majority of sports people out there doing their best to navigate the anti-doping system and the rules?

WADA’s new Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “The global anti-doping movement is shifting. It is recognizing that the majority of stakeholders in sport are trying to do the right thing and that as an anti-doping community we must do more to help and promote them. Our efforts to preserve the spirt of sport from the outset must significantly increase. Education plays a fundamental role in this. It gives athletes and those involved in sport the opportunity to learn about clean sport, its importance and the role they play in maintaining and protecting it.”  

“It is likely clear to most people that doping is cheating, steroids are banned and athletes can be tested. However, what is possibly not so clear to all is the complexity of the anti-doping system, i.e.: the ten different types of Anti-Doping Rule Violations (far more than simply failing a urine test); the regulation required to harmonize anti-doping globally — not just the Code but also the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport; and, the simple fact that there are many substances banned in sport, some of which can be found in everyday over-the-counter medications. Equally, and very importantly, helping those bound by anti-doping rules to understand them; as well as, their rights and responsibilities is something WADA and our stakeholders must continue to commit to.”

Balancing deterring/detecting and preserving/protecting

The development of the global anti-doping program is a very positive story. The idea that, within 20 years of WADA’s creation, a global harmonized anti-doping program has been implemented in almost every country and sport in the world is a phenomenal achievement for any industry or health discipline.

The underlining ethos for most of this time has been one of deterrence and detection, an approach that is an essential part of the anti-doping eco-system. However, as our understanding has increased through research, we recognize that simply deterring and detecting is not enough. Like healthcare, we must not simply detect illnesses and try to deal with them without also focusing on: prevention; early development of healthy behaviors; understanding who is more at risk and why; etc. All are essential to protect health. And so, like health, the anti-doping community continues to increase its prevention efforts, addressing the balance between deterring/detecting and preserving/protecting. Education and the promotion of clean sport behaviors are clearly integral to the system.

International Standard for Education will enable a big boost for Clean Sport

Understanding the complexity of doping behavior and what drives athletes’ decision making is key to all parts of the anti-doping system. As such, much of the challenge to improving the understanding of anti-doping by stakeholders lies in improved education, not just of athletes, but of the support networks around them and importantly of those working in the anti-doping system itself. 1 January 2021 will see a significant reinforcement of education in the proposed 2021 Code; and, perhaps most significant of all, introduction of a new International Standard for Education. This Standard will enable stakeholders to consider those in their sporting landscape who would benefit from education; plan how to reach them; provide education opportunities for them to access; and, then engage to gather feedback for improvements.

This new Standard recognizes that each Anti-Doping Organization will need to prioritize and deliver within their means; and, in some cases, rely on other tools such as WADA’s education materials to assist them. WADA, through its Anti-Doping e-Learning platform (ADeL), has education programs designed for core target audiences; such as: athletes, coaches, medical professionals and parents; as well as, additional resources for personnel leading anti-doping programs and university students. This means that as we enter a new phase of the Code, there should be a strong commitment to provide educational opportunities for those who require them and very little reason not to. “WADA invests in its ADeL platform and other tools because we believe that athletes and those around the athlete must have the opportunity to learn about clean sport and the anti-doping regulations,” said Kangeun Lee, Manager, Education. “We are committed to helping our stakeholders meet every athlete’s right to education as part of a balanced anti-doping program.”

What the research is telling us

So, what difference will this make? We know from a Leeds Beckett research project, which was published by WADA in 2016, that research indicated reasonably broad knowledge of what doping was about among parents, coaches, trainers and medical professionals – collectively known as “athlete support personnel”.

The report also highlighted a significant minority that said that they might encourage athletes to dope “if they were convinced that it would help their athletes and have no negative health implications”. This insight shows us that there is still a long way to go before all involved in sport have the relevant, in-depth knowledge required to prevent both intentional and unintentional doping, and that only a planned and focused effort can change this over the long-term.

In terms of addressing this, Tony Cunningham, Senior Manager, Education and WADA’s lead for Social Science research, stated: “A first important step is a simple change in perspective rather than a paradigm shift. Acknowledging that any prevention system must have detection and deterrence; and, a core tenet must move towards supporting those who wish to compete clean. Promisingly, the new 2021 Code promotes this holistic approach to prevention. This could possibly have a profound impact on how anti-doping and clean sport is viewed; and, in turn, facilitate a more supportive environment towards the goals of clean sport. We know from research that the majority of athletes – even the ones who are already doping – want to compete clean. We also see cases of inadvertent doping across the system. These are largely preventable if athletes and athlete support personnel are educated and informed to navigate everyday risks; and, their sporting environment nurtures and reinforces clean sport behavior.”

“We need to focus much more on helping this majority train and compete clean by reinforcing core values early on in athletes’ sporting experience; and then, instilling the behaviors that they need to participate in line with the anti-doping rules – all through education. Athletes start in sport clean. A lack of knowledge should not be the reason their career ends. As an anti-doping community, we need to work together to educate athletes – to help protect them, their health and the integrity of sport.”

Find out more about WADA’s education activities.


26/09/19 AUSTRALIA AND FRANCE TO HOST WADA GLOBAL EDUCATION CONFERENCES
IN 2020 AND 2022

Montreal, 26 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that, following a public bidding process, Australia and France have been selected as the respective host countries for WADA’s 2020 and 2022 Global Education Conferences.

Similar to the successful Education Conferences WADA convened in 2015 (in Ottawa, Canada) and 2018 (in Beijing, China), the 2020 and 2022 Conferences will gather anti-doping researchers and practitioners from around the world to examine emerging trends, contribute to education program development, and examine how Anti-Doping Organizations can enhance their programs while keeping the athlete at the center of their strategies.

WADA Director of Education, Amanda Hudson said: “WADA is delighted that Australia and France will be hosting the next two editions of the Agency’s Global Education Conference. The applications submitted by both countries were of such high quality that we were able to confirm Australia as the host for 2020 and France as the host for 2022. We look forward to working with the Australian Government, with support from the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA), and the French National Anti-Doping Organization [Agence française de lutte contre le dopage (AFLD)] over the next few years to deliver world class Education Conferences that will help to enhance anti-doping education programs around the globe.”

Ahead of the anticipated launch of the International Standard for Education in January 2021– the most significant development in anti-doping education policy since the World Anti-Doping Program’s inception – WADA’s Global Education Conference will cement itself as the headline event for educators in the anti-doping community. With over 250 participants expected to attend the 2020 edition, WADA hopes to continue to raise the bar in order to ensure that athletes and their support personnel have access to quality anti-doping education, which will help protect them and sport from being damaged by intentional or unintentional use of prohibited substances and methods.

Australian Minister for Youth and Sport, Hon. Richard Colbeck, welcomed WADA’s decision to bring the 2020 Global Education Conference to Australia saying: “Hosting this conference is a great opportunity for Australia to champion its work in delivering high quality sports anti-doping education.”

AFLD President, Dominique Laurent, said: “I am delighted that WADA has chosen our bid, which received the support from the Ministry of Sports, the French National Olympic Committee, Paris 2024, the City of Nice and AFLD’s Athlete Committee. AFLD has made a strategic priority of international cooperation and the reinforcement of anti-doping education programs in France. Two years prior to the Paris 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games, I am convinced that hosting the 2022 Global Education Conference in France will mark another important milestone in the protection of clean athletes and the promotion of ethics in sport.”

The 2015 and 2018 editions of the Global Education Conference convened 200 and 178 participants, respectively, from National Anti-Doping Organizations, Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, National and International Federations, National Olympic Committees and Research Institutions.


25/09/19 WADA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2020 STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIR VACANCIES

Montreal, 25 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is seeking nominations for 2020 for the Chairs of four (of its five) Standing Committees, which report into WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board) and act as advisory committees, providing guidance for the Agency’s programs.
 
The current Standing Committee Chair terms end on 31 December 2019. This public call applies to the following four vacancies:

  1. Athlete Committee
  2. Education Committee
  3. Finance and Administration Committee
  4. Health, Medical and Research Committee

The successful candidates will take office on 23 January 2020 [the date that WADA’s ExCo will approve the nominations]; and, their terms will conclude on 31 December 2022; after which, candidates may reapply to continue for two further three-year periods.

The term of the Agency’s Compliance Review Committee Chair also concludes on 31 December 2019; however, this role will be filled via a different process due to a stricter requirement for independence. The newly formed Nominations Committee will be responsible for recruiting, reviewing and vetting the candidates for this specific position, and for setting the related processes.

Standing Committee Chair Role

Below, WADA is pleased to provide links to the revised Role Description/Position Profiles and Terms of Reference for each of the Committee Chair positions, which outline the scope of work and detail the functioning of the respective Committees.

How to apply

To be considered, all applications must be forwarded by Friday, 1 November 2019 to Mr Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General, (c/o e-mail: marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org or fax: +1 514 904 8743).

In the case of the Athlete Committee Chair, the closing date to submit applications is Thursday, 24 October 2019. This special timeline is required as the WADA Athlete Committee will be reviewing the applications, which is not the case for the other positions.

All nominations must include the following:

  • a maximum one-page cover (motivational) letter;
  • an updated curriculum vitae, which fully captures the candidate’s experience and expertise;
  • letters of endorsement from at least two members of WADA’s Board (one representing the Olympic Movement and one representing the Public Authorities); and
  • a signed declaration of independence form.

Any questions can also be directed to Mr Niggli, c/o Ms Chinnarassen.
 
Governance Reforms and Independence
 
As it relates to independence, in 2017 and 2018, WADA carried out a governance review, which resulted in a series of reforms that were endorsed by WADA’s Board in November 2018; including, that certain independence criteria be applied to some governance roles.
 
Accordingly, the Chair of each of these four Committees will need to meet the following requirements of WADA’s General Standard of Independence as stipulated below:
 
“An individual is considered independent when he/she remains free of undue influence, is independent in character and judgment and there are no relationships or circumstances which to an informed third party could affect, or could appear to affect, the individual’s judgment.”
 
About WADA
 
Formed in 1999, WADA is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the Sports Movement and Governments of the world. As the global regulatory body, WADA’s primary role is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Its key activities include: ensuring and monitoring effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code and its related International Standards; scientific and social science research; education; intelligence and investigations; and building anti-doping capacity with anti-doping organizations worldwide.
 
WADA’s vision is a world where all athletes can compete in a doping-free sporting environment; and, the Agency’s mission is to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport.
 
WADA is composed of a 38-member Board, which is WADA’s supreme decision-making body; a 12-member ExCo, which is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and several Committees. The Board and ExCo are composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments. The Board delegates the actual management and running of the Agency, including the performance of activities and the administration of assets, to the ExCo.


25/09/19 WADA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2020 STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER VACANCIES

Montreal, 25 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is seeking nominations for 2020 for a number of vacant member positions on its five Standing Committees, which report into WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board). The successful candidates will take office on or before 1 March 2020, which is the date that the nominations will be approved by WADA’s ExCo.
 
There will be various vacant positions on WADA’s five Committees in 2020. The number of vacancies on each Committee varies subject to the current composition and rotation that is in place. The five Committees are:

  1. Athlete Committee   
  2. Compliance Review Committee
  3. Education Committee
  4. Finance and Administration Committee     
  5. Health, Medical and Research Committee 

[Note that there is one vacant position on the Compliance Review Committee and it is specifically to represent the Public Authorities.]
 
In accordance with WADA’s governing rules concerning Standing Committee composition and rotation, on an annual basis, the Agency seeks nominations from its stakeholders for candidates to fill upcoming vacancies. Accordingly, WADA invites its stakeholders to consider their respective regions and organizations; and, to nominate suitable candidates.
 
It must be noted that, in 2017 and 2018, WADA carried out a governance review, which resulted in a series of reforms that were endorsed by WADA’s Board in November 2018; including that, WADA’s Standing Committees are to be composed of a maximum of 12 members. In the past, some of the Committees have exceeded this number; and therefore, in order to adhere to this number and achieve an equal rotation, a maximum of four members only change each year based on terms of three years. However, in 2020, given that the positions of Chair are also vacant, there is a maximum of three member vacancies per Committee.
 
Also, exceptionally for 2020, Member terms will commence on 1 March vs. 1 January. This is due to the timing of certain governance reforms, which must be completed before the Standing Committees can be presented for approval by WADA’s ExCo.
 
Another recommendation resulting from the governance review was that the Education, Finance and Administration, and Health, Medical and Research Standing Committees must include an Athlete and a National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO) representative. Some Committees already have such members; whereas, others need to be appointed for 2020. We encourage Athletes and NADOs to consider these opportunities.
 
Standing Committee Member Role
 
Below, WADA is pleased to provide links to the revised Terms of Reference for each WADA Standing Committee, which outlines the scope of work and details the functioning of the respective Committees.

How to apply

To be considered, all nominations must include the following and be forwarded by Friday, 20 December 2019, to Mr Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General (c/o e-mail: 
marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org
 or fax: +1 514 904 8743):

  • an updated curriculum vitae, which fully outlines the candidate’s experience and expertise; and
  • a letter of endorsement from one of WADA’s current Board members or a recognized WADA stakeholder group.

 Any questions can also be directed to Mr Niggli, c/o Ms Chinnarassen.
 
 About WADA

Formed in 1999, WADA is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the Sports Movement and Governments of the world. As the global regulatory body, WADA’s primary role is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Its key activities include: ensuring and monitoring effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code and its related International Standards; scientific and social science research; education; intelligence and investigations; and building anti-doping capacity with anti-doping organizations worldwide.
 
WADA’s vision is a world where all athletes can compete in a doping-free sporting environment; and, the Agency’s mission is to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport.
 
WADA is composed of a 38-member Board,  which is WADA’s supreme decision-making body; a 12-member ExCo, which is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and  several Committees. The Board and ExCo are composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments. The Board delegates the actual management and running of the Agency, including the performance of activities and the administration of assets, to the ExCo.


24/09/19 WADA AND JAPAN SIGN AGREEMENT TO CONTINUE REGIONAL ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATION FUNDING

Tokyo, 24 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the Government of Japan signed an agreement on Tuesday that continues Japan’s long-running support for Regional Anti-Doping Organizations (RADOs) in Asia.

The agreement was signed by WADA President Sir Craig Reedie and Commissioner of the Japan Sports Agency (JSA) Daichi Suzuki during a two-day international anti-doping seminar for Asia and Oceania in Tokyo, hosted by the Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA). The partnership means that the JSA will strengthen its commitment to further develop RADOs in the Asia region beyond 2019.

The funding will continue to assist RADOs with the development of anti-doping programs and provide funds for WADA to help with the training of anti-doping officials in the region.

Sir Craig said: “Japan has been making a significant contribution to the Asian RADOs since 2008 and we are grateful to the Japanese Government for extending it by another 12 months at least. This close cooperation between Japan, WADA and the RADOs has borne fruit over the years, particularly as it relates to building anti-doping capacity. This has led to the RADOs establishing positive reputations and strengthening the overall program throughout the region.”

Mr Suzuki said: “Japan has supported WADA’s international activities ever since its establishment in 1999 and we are committed to seeing that partnership continue into the future. In particular, we have always encouraged the Asian countries for the development of anti-doping activities in the region. In addition, since 2008, Japan has provided assistance to Asian RADOs in cooperation with WADA. It is very significant that we sign today the partnership agreement for the assistance to RADOs to strengthen our cooperation.

“Now we are accelerating promotion of training of Doping Control Officers, enhancement of laboratory and investigation and intelligence programs in cooperation with the Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee, the Japan Sport Council and JADA for doping-free Games in Tokyo 2020. As a legacy project, we also started the ‘I Play True Relay’ to invite play true messages from all over the world to deliver the value of sport for the future.”

There are five RADOs in Asia working across 36 countries, with particular emphasis on compliance to the World Anti-Doping Code. The RADO program helps develop Code-compliant systems that encompass testing, education and general awareness of anti-doping issues in smaller countries while ensuring that resources can be pooled and used more effectively.

It means that the long-term sustainability and level of testing and anti-doping education worldwide can be enhanced and ensure that athletes, regardless of their location or sport, are subject to robust anti-doping protocols and processes. Globally, the program includes 15 RADOs involving 130 participating nations.

Meanwhile, WADA is taking an active role in the two-day international anti-doping seminar for Asia and Oceania in Tokyo this week with Sir Craig addressing the meeting and Director General Olivier Niggli making a detailed presentation on WADA’s priorities and the continued development of the global anti-doping program.

The event, which is open to media on the morning of the first day, also sees the next WADA President, Witold Banka, and the next WADA Vice-President, Yang Yang, form part of an athlete panel that includes former Olympian Daichi Suzuki as well as member of the IOC Athlete Commission, WADA Athlete Committee and WADA Executive Committee (ExCo), Danka Bartekova and JADA Athlete Committee member Masaki Fujita. The panel will explore the opportunities for athletes to leave a meaningful anti-doping legacy, particularly in the context of next year’s Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo.

Several WADA Directors and other staff members are playing active roles in the seminar, all of whom are in Tokyo for other meetings, in particular the WADA ExCo on 23 September. A topic that is dominating proceedings is the effective implementation of the Code and associated International Standards in light of their ongoing review, which will culminate with their adoption at the World Conference on Doping in Sport in Katowice, Poland in November. Following what has been an extensive and fully collaborative process, the revised documents will come into force on 1 January 2021.


24/09/19 WADA AND KYOWA KIRIN CO. SIGN AGREEMENT FORMALIZING COLLABORATION TO PROTECT CLEAN SPORT

Tokyo, 24 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) on Monday, 23 September, signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with major Japanese pharmaceutical company Kyowa Kirin Co., which will ensure that the Agency is notified immediately of any new Kyowa Kirin compounds or substances in development that have the potential for sports-related abuse.

The MOU, which was signed in Tokyo by WADA President Sir Craig Reedie and Kyowa Kirin President and CEO, Dr. Masashi Miyamoto, is a commitment on the part of Kyowa Kirin to support WADA in its protection of clean sport. Consequently, Kyowa Kirin has already established an internal process to identify compounds in development that could be used to gain an unfair advantage in the sporting arena.

Following the signing, Sir Craig said: “It is important for WADA to continue to partner with leading pharmaceutical and healthcare research organizations around the world such as Kyowa Kirin for the benefit of both communities. We have a long tradition of collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry and this partnership will help WADA develop new strategies to identify substances that could be subject to misuse and abuse.

“Doping in sport relies heavily on the misuse of commercially available substances developed for proper therapeutic use as well as newly discovered compounds. Learning about those new compounds while they are still in development gives us a head-start as we devise our own strategies, whether that is in the area of education, detection or investigation. I would like to thank Dr. Miyamoto and his team at Kyowa Kirin for their commitment to supporting WADA as we target those who would attempt to abuse legitimate medicines for doping purposes. The Agency looks forward to a long and fruitful collaboration.”

Dr. Satoshi Nakanishi, Executive Officer, Director of the Corporate Social Responsibility Management Department, Kyowa Kirin, said: “Misuse and abuse of medicine for doping in sport not only endangers athletes’ health and the fairness of competition but also damages the sustainability of medical development in the pharmaceutical industry. This collaboration with WADA is one of our actions to solve social health-related issues and enhance quality of life to contribute to the health and well-being of people around the world. This is also one of our missions as a pharmaceutical company.”

It is anticipated that WADA and Kyowa Kirin will explore the potential for a more extensive collaboration in the future. Since 2011, WADA has been forging alliances with a number of companies within the pharmaceutical sector in order to keep up to date with the ever-shifting drug research and development landscape. These agreements have included some of the biggest and most influential drug firms in the world, such as GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer and Roche, as well as the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. In that time, WADA and the global anti-doping program have benefitted from advance notice of potentially performance-enhancing substances before they are released to the market, allowing the Agency to develop detection methods at a much faster rate.


23/09/19 WADA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE DISCUSSES RUSADA CODE COMPLIANCE

Tokyo, 23 September 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) held an Executive Committee (ExCo) meeting in Tokyo, Japan, which was graciously hosted by the country’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The 12-member ExCo is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and is composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments.

While the ExCo approved the 2020 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List), which will be published before 1 October 2019 and come into effect on 1 January 2020, the full-day meeting primarily focused on other matters and decisions related to World Anti-Doping Code (Code) compliance, the 2021 Code Review process, WADA governance reforms and other topics related to science and medicine – the main ones that are outlined in the summary below.

Reflecting on the day’s events, WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, said: “I am pleased with the discussions that the Executive Committee had on a number of key matters for the future of WADA and Clean Sport on the whole. The quality of the debate and the involvement of all stakeholders bode well as we head towards the World Conference on Doping in Sport in November; during which, decisions will be taken that will strengthen the global anti-doping program.”

Code Compliance: RUSADA

The ExCo received an update from the Chair of the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) concerning compliance of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) with the Code.

The ExCo was informed that good progress was being made by WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) in analyzing the data retrieved from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. To date, 47 cases have already been identified and evidentiary packages sent to the relevant International Federations (IFs) as per the process outlined by WADA in July, and several disciplinary proceedings have been commenced by the IFs based on that evidence.

The ExCo was also informed that further investigation, by WADA I&I and independent experts in digital forensics, of the inconsistencies in the Moscow Laboratory data outlined in WADA’s press release dated 2 July 2019 had led WADA to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA on 17 September 2019. Ensuring the authenticity of the Moscow Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) and underlying raw data was one of the critical conditions imposed by the ExCo for RUSADA to maintain its compliance with the Code when the ExCo decided to reinstate RUSADA as Code-compliant in September 2018.

The ExCo was advised that WADA had decided to pursue the compliance procedure against RUSADA on a fast-track basis, in accordance with Article 9.5 of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS). RUSADA and the Russian Ministry of Sport have been provided with copies of the reports of WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts that detail the inconsistencies in question and have been given three weeks to provide their comments, together with answers to a list of specific questions.

Once that response has been received and analyzed, WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts will report back to the CRC, so that the CRC is in a position to decide whether to bring a formal recommendation to the ExCo. No fixed timeline can be set for this, as due process must be respected, but the ExCo was assured that WADA is pursuing the matter robustly and as quickly as practicable.

In the meantime, the process of using the remaining data from the Moscow Laboratory and other forms of evidence to bring more cheats to justice continues. The aforementioned 47 cases are unaffected and contained no inconsistencies in the data.

Code Compliance: International Taekwon-Do Federation

The ExCo approved the CRC’s recommendation asserting that the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF Austria) is non-compliant with the Code and proposing appropriate consequences. This Code Signatory organization did not complete WADA’s Code Compliance Questionnaire, which is a critical requirement under the ISCCS, despite multiple WADA reminders and offers of assistance. It will now be formally notified about its non-compliance and will have 21 days to dispute WADA’s assertion of non-compliance.

It should be noted that ITF Austria is not the IF that regulates the sport of Taekwon-Do globally. It was accepted as a Code Signatory before WADA implemented a policy in 2009 to ensure that no organization could become a Signatory if it had a conflict with an existing Signatory. The World Taekwon-Do Federation (WTF) is the Olympic IF for the sport and is not affected by this assertion of non-compliance.

Governance Reforms

The ExCo received a detailed progress report on the implementation and timing of WADA’s  wide-ranging governance reforms, which were approved by the Foundation Board (Board) in November 2018 and, regarding which, an implementation plan was laid out in May 2019

As regards the composition of the inaugural five-person Nominations Committee, which is set to play a key role over the coming months in shaping WADA’s governance, individuals were proposed by an independent consultancy firm and approved by the ExCo. The names of those individuals will be publicly announced shortly once they have been officially informed.

The role of the Nominations Committee will be to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. In particular, the Committee will recommend appropriate individuals to chair WADA’s Standing Committees as well as two new independent members of the ExCo next year. The ExCo also approved the terms of reference for the Agency’s five Standing Committees as well as the corresponding Chair profiles, which will be published this week as part of a public call for interest for the Standing Committee Chair vacancies for 2020.

2021 Code and International Standards

The ExCo received a detailed progress report regarding the latest drafts of the 2021 Code and related International Standards, which have been subject of a two-year, three-phase, stakeholder consultation.

The ExCo provided comments on the latest drafts and was advised that some minor amendments will be made before publishing the final drafts of the revised Code and Standards – as well as the two new proposed Standards (covering education and results management) –
mid-October in preparation for these documents being adopted at the World Conference on Doping in Sport, which will take place in Katowice, Poland, from 5-7 November. The revised Code and Standards and the two new Standards will enter into force on 1 January 2021.

Athlete Committee Chair Report

The ExCo received an update from the Chair of WADA’s Athlete Committee concerning a number of projects that they are leading. These include the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights that they initiated in 2017; the establishment of an ombudsperson resource for anti-doping within WADA; and the matter of enhanced athlete representation within WADA’s governance structure.

The ExCo made a number of suggestions related to the three projects, which the Athlete Committee will address in the course of its work over the coming weeks.  

Science and Medicine

Beyond approval of the 2020 List, which contains minor changes from the current 2019 List, the ExCo approved funding recommendations for research proposals for WADA’s 2019 call for scientific research grants. A total of 19 projects were selected for funding amounting to USD 1,946,283, with more than half (USD 1,087,693) coming from WADA’s Special Research Fund and the remainder from the 2019 WADA Research Project.

In addition, the ExCo approved funding of USD 250,000 for one research proposal on artificial intelligence (AI), with the funding coming from the Agency’s Special Research Fund. This project – which is the third being funded by WADA in relation to AI – is covered by the agreement signed between the Agency and the Fonds de Recherche du Québec in May 2018 specifically to fund research in a number of areas including AI.

Further to the adoption in September 2018 of a new Technical Document for Athlete Passport Management Units (APMUs) that came into effect on 1 March 2019, the ExCo granted approval to ten WADA-accredited laboratories to manage APMUs. This APMU status, which confirms that these laboratories fulfill a number of quality and independence criteria, will allow the laboratories in question to drive essential anti-doping activities in relation to the Athlete Biological Passport program. The relevant laboratories are: Barcelona, Spain; Cologne, Germany; Ghent, Belgium; Lausanne, Switzerland; Oslo, Norway; Paris, France; Seibersdorf, Austria; Sydney, Australia; Tokyo, Japan; and Warsaw, Poland.

Revised Technical Document for Sport Specific Analysis (TDSSA)

A revised TDSSA was approved by the ExCo following a comprehensive consultation process with stakeholders. The document, which will come into effect 1 January 2020, will provide Anti-Doping Organizations with more flexibility in its implementation while continuing to ensure that minimum levels of analysis for specific prohibited substances within the scope of the TDSSA are harmonized globally across sports and disciplines. The revised TDSSA will be published on 1 October.


17/09/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2018 ANNUAL REPORT THEMED ‘THE RIGHT WAY TOGETHER’

Montreal, 17 September 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published its 2018 Annual Report. This Report outlines the Agency’s various activities last year that, alongside its partners, have led to a strengthened global anti-doping system. Under the title ‘The Right Way Together’, the Annual Report is an important element of WADA’s commitment to accountability and transparency.

With WADA’s vision and 11 key strategic priorities guiding the way, the Annual Report demonstrates how WADA is performing against these and how progress continues to be made. WADA’s extensive activities related to World Anti-Doping Code (Code) compliance monitoring, investigations, science, education, data protection, capacity-building and others, continue to form the framework of the Agency’s day-to-day efforts.

WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “While 2018 was another challenging year for WADA, we are proud to say that it saw a number of important and far-reaching decisions being made that better equipped the Agency to pursue our evolving mission as the global regulator of clean sport.

“In September 2018, the Executive Committee (ExCo) decided to reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency as compliant with the Code, breaking a long-running impasse and, in the process, enabling WADA to gain access to the all-important Moscow Laboratory data and samples that are now being used to bring more cheats to justice. And in November, the approval by the Foundation Board (Board) of a raft of wide-ranging governance reforms will make WADA more independent and more representative of our stakeholders, for the good of clean sport around the world. 

“Helping fund WADA’s increased activities, in November 2017 and May 2018 the Board approved increases to the Agency’s 2017 budget by 8% each year between 2018 and 2022. This commitment demonstrates the importance of WADA’s mission and the faith that the Board maintains in its management.

“Working with and listening to all our stakeholders in every aspect of the Agency’s mandate remains the defining constant that leads to our progress. This Report is a snapshot of WADA’s collaborative achievements alongside its partners to strengthen clean sport around the world.”

Regarding WADA’s partners, in their joint message in the Report, Sir Craig and Director General Olivier Niggli “acknowledge and thank the 158 volunteers, which make up WADA’s Board, ExCo, Standing Committees, Ethics Panel, and Expert and Advisory Groups. Like most sporting bodies, our talented and dedicated volunteers are the backbone of the Agency. Without their engagement, time and expertise, the Agency and clean sport would simply not advance.”

With an actual 2018 budget of USD 35.4 million, WADA closed out the year with a workforce of 117 people employed at its headquarters in Montreal, Canada, and its offices in Cape Town, Tokyo, Lausanne, and Montevideo. Together, the WADA team collaborates day-in and day-out with its partners to preserve the integrity of sport and uphold the values of fair play for athletes worldwide.

In keeping with our sustainability efforts, the Annual Report is being published online.


13/09/19 FINAL DEADLINES TO REGISTER PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS FOR WADA’S FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

DEADLINE TO REGISTER INTERVENTIONS IS 4 OCTOBER AND PARTICIPANTS IS 18 OCTOBER

WADA ENCOURAGES ORGANIZATIONS TO REGISTER ATHLETE DELEGATES

Montreal, 13 September 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that it has extended the deadline to register participants for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport – taking place in Katowice, Poland from 5-7 November – to 18 October. The Agency also takes this opportunity to remind delegates that should they wish to make a public intervention during the Conference, the deadline to register is 4 October.

PARTICIPANT AND ATHLETE REGISTRATION

Under the participation terms of the World Conference, organizations are permitted to register a pre-determined number of delegates for the event. This year, in order to encourage athlete participation, the Agency is inviting organizations to register one athlete as a delegate on top of their allotment listed on the Conference website. With over 1,100 participants already registered, WADA strongly encourages stakeholders to register as soon as possible in order to secure participation.

For further information on allotments and to register participants and/or athletes by the deadline of 18 October, please consult the Conference website that contains all relevant information, including: the program; the goals and objectivesintervention registration and submissionparticipation terms; and a preliminary list of confirmed speakers.

INTERVENTION REGISTRATION AND SUBMISSION

As it has done at previous World Conferences, WADA will once again offer delegates the opportunity to intervene publicly during the Conference Plenary Sessions related to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

Please note that only delegates can publicly intervene and that priority will be given to those that register their request to intervene prior to the Conference. Due to the high number of interventions expected, they will be limited to three minutes each. In the event that more intervention requests are received than available slots, WADA will be required to prioritize the interventions and/or possibly shorten the time offered.

The process for registering and submitting interventions is outlined in full on the Conference website and the key highlights are summarized below:To register interventions Delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Plenary Sessions (related to the Code) should register their interest via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 4 October 2019.

The same process applies to delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Side Sessions of the Conference where the focus will be on the various International Standards and the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights.To submit interventionsDelegates who wish to make an intervention in Katowice are strongly encouraged to provide an advance copy of their written document in English and/or French via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 21 October 2019.

Written documents should be a maximum of two A4 (or letter size) pages in length (approximately 400-500 words).

All documents will be posted on the Conference website as soon as possible after the relevant session.

While non-delegate participants are welcome to submit a written contribution, the Agency will not be able to accommodate these submissions with an intervention slot during the Conference Plenary Sessions.

Should you have any questions regarding the Conference, including queries relating to registration, accommodation and transport, please consult the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


11/09/19 2017 ADRVs REPORT ‘PRE-RELEASE’ CONSULTATION

Montreal, 11 September 2019

Dear Colleagues,

In accordance with Articles 14.4 and 14.5 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), WADA, acting as a central clearinghouse for Doping Control testing results, annually publishes statistical reports summarizing the information that it receives from Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs).

Today, we are pleased to provide ADOs with a ‘pre-release’ of the 2017 Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) Report, which is presented in the following four sections, and includes analytical ADRVs as a result of Adverse Analytical Findings (AAFs) reported by the WADA-accredited laboratories and non-analytical ADRVs reported to WADA by ADOs:

  • Section 1: Outcomes of 2017 AAFs by Sport Category
  • Section 2: Outcomes of 2017 AAFs by Testing Authority
  • Section 3: Report of 2017 Non-Analytical ADRVs
  • Section 4: Report of 2017 Total Analytical and Non-Analytical ADRVs

WADA provides the Report to you in advance of public distribution so that you can review and/or comment on the data of your respective ADO before it is published. Accordingly, should you wish to comment, kindly do so no later than 25 September 2019 via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online consultation platform. Easy to use, WADAConnect will prompt you to create a user account and input your comments. For further information related to WADAConnect, please refer to the simple user guide.

Should you have any other questions or comments concerning the 2017 ADRVs Report, we invite you to contact statistics@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


23/08/19 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION REGARDING TECHNICAL LETTERS ON IN SITU FORMATION OF SPECIFIC SUBSTANCES

Montreal, 22 August 2019 

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites stakeholders to participate in a consultation process regarding four new Technical Letters:

  1. TL-18: in situ formation of 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione (6-oxo) and metabolites;

This Technical Letter includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of 6-oxo and Metabolites in urine samples, which may result from the in situ transformation of DHEA.

  1. TL-19: in situ formation of testolactone;

This Technical Letter includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of testolactone in urine samples, which may result from the in situ transformation of DHEA.

  1. TL-20: in situ formation of prednisone and prednisolone; and 

This Technical Letter includes clarification regarding the possible detection of prednisone and/or prednisolone in urine samples, which may result from the in situ transformation of cortisone and cortisol, respectively.

  1. TL-21: in situ formation of specific substances with a steroid structure.

This Technical Letter includes clarification regarding the possible detection of Prohibited Substances with a steroid structure in urine samples, which may result from the in situtransformation of endogenous steroids.

Stakeholders are invited to review these Technical Letters and provide comments by 1 September 2019, using WADA’s online consultation platform, WADAConnect.

Under the International Standard for Laboratories, WADA’s Technical Letters provide specific direction to the WADA-accredited laboratories; WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport; and, other stakeholders on particular issues regarding the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures.

For any questions related to the above, we invite you to contact science@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


22/08/19 WADA SUSPENDS ACCREDITATION OF NEW DELHI LABORATORY

Montreal, 22 August 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of the National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL) in New Delhi, India, for a period of up to six months.

This suspension has been imposed due to non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) as identified during a WADA site visit, including in relation to the laboratory’s isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) analytical method, as regulated by the relevant technical document (TD2016IRMS).

In May 2019, disciplinary proceedings were initiated by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) and subsequently carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee, which was mandated to make a recommendation to the Chair of the WADA Executive Committee regarding the status of the laboratory’s accreditation. This process is now complete.

The suspension, which took effect on 20 August 2019, prohibits the NDTL from carrying out any anti-doping activities, including all analyses of urine and blood samples. During the period of suspension, samples that have not yet been analyzed by the NDTL; samples currently undergoing a confirmation procedure; and any samples for which an Adverse Analytical Finding has been reported, must be securely transported to another WADA-accredited laboratory. This is in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis, which also helps preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

Pursuant to Article 13.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the laboratory may appeal this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days of receipt of notice.

During the period of suspension, the laboratory shall address all non-conformities identified by the LabEG or WADA in any request for corrective action or otherwise, as well as any additional non-conformities identified during any follow up WADA site visit during the suspension period. If the laboratory satisfies the LabEG in meeting these requirements, it may apply for reinstatement prior to the expiry of the six-month suspension period. Should the laboratory not address the non-conformities by the end of the six-month suspension period, WADA may extend the suspension of the laboratory’s accreditation for up to an additional six months.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


16/08/19 WADA TO DELIVER INDEPENDENT OBSERVER AND ATHLETE OUTREACH PROGRAMS AT THE 2019 AFRICAN GAMES

Montreal, 15 August 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to outline its planned Independent Observer (IO) and Athlete Outreach (AO) programs for the 12th African Games, taking place from 19 to 31 August 2019 in Rabat, Morocco. The Games will involve almost 7,000 athletes from 54 African countries competing in 26 sports.

The IO and AO teams (listed below) will be active during the African Games and, respectively, will provide real-time expert advice to organizers on all matters relating to the doping control program in place, and will give athletes and their supporting teams the opportunity to learn more about anti-doping and how the anti-doping community works to protect clean sport.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The African Games are another important event on this year’s sporting calendar as we inch closer to the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020. WADA is pleased that an Independent Observer team will be present in Rabat, working alongside the African Games’ doping control team and organizers, to assess every aspect of the anti-doping program in place for the benefit of clean athletes.

“We also welcome the opportunity for a dynamic WADA outreach team to be on hand to engage and educate participating athletes and their support personnel about anti-doping and the importance of instilling clean sport values within the larger sporting community. These are key priorities for WADA and I wish to thank the Association of National Olympic Committees of Africa (ANOCA) and the African Games’ organizing committee for their ongoing support in helping us to execute these programs on the ground.”

WADA’s IO team, which is composed of international experts in anti-doping, is intended to instill confidence in athletes and other stakeholders as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of anti-doping programs being carried out at major events around the world.

The IO team will observe all aspects of the African Games’ anti-doping program, including:

  • Test distribution planning
  • Selection of competitors for testing
  • Notification of doping control
  • Sample collection procedures
  • Therapeutic Use Exemption procedures
  • Results management

The team will provide daily feedback to ANOCA and the African Games Organization Committee of Rabat 2019 (RAGOC). The team will then issue a post-event report that will include a series of observations and recommendations designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future African Games.

A WADA AO team will also be present to provide an opportunity for all competitors to engage with anti-doping in an informal and fun environment. The AO team, which will be staffed by anti-doping experts from across the African continent, will be active in the athletes’ village during the first week of the Games. The aim of the team is to raise awareness among athletes, support personnel and others as to the dangers and consequences of doping and as it relates to athletes’ rights and responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code.

Visitors to the AO booth will be encouraged to complete the Play True Quiz, which is now available in 43 languages, to sign a pledge explaining why they Play True, and to share their experience on social media using the hashtag #PlayTrue.

THE IO AND AO TEAM MEMBERS

The IO Team

  • Sophie Berwick (IO Chair), Anti-Doping Consultant
  • Sameh Elray (Team Manager), WADA
  • Dr. Elske Schabort, South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS)
  • Issoufou Aliou, African Regional Anti-Doping Organization (RADO) Zone II and III

The AO Team

  • Anica Manuel Joao Neto Troso, RADO Zone VI
  • Jason Hilton Snyders, RADO Zone VI
  • Mohamed Habib Zaoui, RADO Zone I
  • Nathalie Bashala, WADA
  • Prince Addo Osei, RADO Zone VI
  • Stacy Spletzer-Jegen, WADA

15/08/19 REMINDER: WADA DEADLINE TO REGISTER FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT IS 30 AUGUST

Montreal, 15 August 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that 30 August 2019 is the deadline to register for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, whichwill take place from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland. Stakeholders are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the deadline, as delegate status cannot be guaranteed once it has passed.

The Agency also wishes to remind you that 1 September is the deadline to book accommodation at the preferential rate negotiated for Conference participants. As the number of hotel rooms in Katowice is limited, we strongly encourage you to book your accommodation as soon as possible.

The Conference, which is being organized with the generous support of the Polish Ministry of Sport and Tourism, will convene global anti-doping stakeholders to take stock of the evolution of clean sport and engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program. The Conference will culminate with endorsement of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards, which will take effect on 1 January 2021; as well as, the election of the new WADA President and Vice-President – who will assume their roles on 1 January 2020.

For further information regarding the Conference, and to register by the deadline of 30 August, please consult the Conference website that contains all relevant information, including: theprogram; the goals and objectivesintervention registration and submissionparticipation terms; and a preliminary list of confirmed speakers, which includes the following individuals, among others:

  • Andrzej Duda, President of the Republic of Poland
  • Thomas Bach, President, International Olympic Committee
  • Witold Bańka, Incoming WADA President
  • Jean-Paul Costa, President, International Institute of Human Rights
  • Ulrich Haas, Professor of Procedural and Private Law, University of Zurich
  • Yang Yang, Incoming WADA Vice-President
  • Richard Young, Attorney and main drafter of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code

Should you have any questions regarding the Conference, including queries relating to registration, accommodation and transport, please consult the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


05/08/19 WADA LIFTS PARTIAL SUSPENSION OF STOCKHOLM LABORATORY’S ACCREDITATION FOR A SPECIFIC ANALYTICAL METHOD

Montreal, 5 August 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that, in accordance with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), Sir Craig Reedie, Chairman of WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), has approved lifting the partial suspension of the accreditation of the Doping Control Laboratory at the Karolinska University Hospital (Stockholm Laboratory) as it relates to the gas chromatography / combustion / isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) method.

The Stockholm Laboratory, which had its accreditation partially suspended for the GC/C/IRMS method on 1 August 2018, has resolved the issue that led to the partial suspension. As such, on 29 July 2019, the WADA Laboratory Expert Group recommended to the Agency’s ExCo Chairman that the partial suspension be lifted. Therefore, effective 1 August 2019, the Stockholm Laboratory, which had continued to carry out all of its other regular anti-doping activities, is no longer required to securely transport samples that require GC/C/IRMS analysis to another WADA-accredited laboratory.

“WADA is pleased to confirm that the Stockholm Laboratory’s accreditation has been reinstated twelve months after the Laboratory was partially suspended,” said WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli. “We commend the Stockholm Laboratory for their comprehensive response in addressing the issue that led to the partial suspension; and, assure athletes that they can be confident that the Laboratory is operating at the high standards required by WADA and the global anti-doping program.”

WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. When a laboratory does not meet ISL requirements, WADA may decide to suspend or revoke the laboratory’s accreditation. This monitoring role is conducted in conjunction with ISO/IEC 17025 assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).

The full list of accredited laboratories can be found on WADA’s website.


01/08/19 WADA PUBLISHES FIRST LIST OF CONFIRMED SPEAKERS FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 1 August 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish a first list of confirmed speakers for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport to be held from 5-7 November 2019in Katowice, Polandwhich includes the following individuals:

  • Andrzej Duda, President of the Republic of Poland
  • Thomas Bach, President, International Olympic Committee
  • Witold Bańka, President-Elect, WADA
  • Jean-Paul Costa, President, International Institute of Human Rights
  • Ulrich Haas, Professor of Procedural and Private Law, University of Zurich
  • Yang Yang, Vice-President-Elect, WADA
  • Richard Young, Attorney and main drafter of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code

The Conference will convene global anti-doping stakeholders to take stock of the evolution of Clean Sport; engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program; and, wrap up with endorsement of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards that will take effect on 1 January 2021; as well as the election of a new WADA President and Vice President that will assume their roles on 1 January 2020.

The final list of speakers will include representatives and experts from the global anti-doping community including athletes, Anti-Doping Organizations, legal professionals, scientists, law enforcement officials, former WADA Presidents, and others.

For the evolving list of speakers, along with their biographies and scheduled presentations, please consult the Speakers/Presenters section of the Conference website. 

If you are not already registered for the Conference and wish to attend, please register on the Conference website no later than 30 August 2019. The website contains all relevant information regarding the Conference, including the program, goals and objectives, intervention registration and submission, as well as participation terms.

For any other questions regarding the Conference, please refer to the list of key contacts on the website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


30/07/19 WADA INDEPENDENT OBSERVER AND ATHLETE OUTREACH PROGRAMS IN ACTION AT LIMA 2019 GAMES

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to outline its Independent Observer (IO) and Athlete Outreach (AO) programs at the Lima 2019 Pan American (Pan Am) Games, which run from 26 July to 11 August; and, the Parapan American (Parapan Am) Games, to be held from 23 August to 1 September 2019.

The IO and AO teams (listed below) will be active throughout the Pan Am Games and, respectively, are providing real-time expert advice to organizers on all matters relating to the doping control program in place, and giving athletes and their supporting teams the opportunity to learn more about anti-doping and how the anti-doping community works to protect clean sport. The AO Team will also be staying on throughout the Parapan Am Games in order to conduct their activities with para-athletes and their support teams as well.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The Pan American Games are an important event on the sporting calendar with almost 7,000 athletes from 41 American countries competing in 39 sports. In the lead-up to the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games, it is especially important for our experienced team of observers to be present as many of the Pan Am events are qualifiers for the Olympic Games.

“In addition to our IO team, a dynamic WADA Athlete Outreach team is also on hand to provide an opportunity for all competitors to engage with anti-doping in an informal and fun environment. Raising anti-doping awareness with the world’s competing athletes and their support personnel, reminding them of clean sport values and asking them to reflect on all the reasons why they choose to play true is a critical task for the anti-doping community, and I wish to thank Pan Am Sports and the Games’ organizing committee for partnering with WADA on such an important occasion.”

WADA’s IO team, which is composed of international experts in anti-doping, is intended to instill confidence in athletes and other stakeholders as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of anti-doping programs being carried out at major events around the world.

The IO team is observing all aspects of the Pan Am Games’ anti-doping program, including:

  • Test distribution planning
  • Selection of competitors for testing
  • Notification of doping control
  • Sample collection procedures
  • Therapeutic Use Exemption procedures
  • Results management

The team is providing daily feedback to Pan Am Sports as well as the Lima 2019 Organizing Committee. The team will then issue a post-event report that will include a series of observations and recommendations designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future Pan Am Games.

WADA’s AO team, which is staffed by anti-doping experts from across the Americas, is active in the athletes’ village during the Pan Am Games and will be active during the Parapan Am Games as well. The aim of the team is to build awareness among athletes, support personnel and others as to the dangers and consequences of doping and as it relates to athletes’ rights and responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code.

Visitors to the AO booth are encouraged to complete the Play True Quiz, which is now available in 43 languages, to sign a pledge explaining why they Play True, and to share their experience on social media using the hashtag #PlayTrue.

Beyond WADA’s IO and AO activities during the Lima 2019 Games, in connection with the mandate of WADA’s Prevalence Working Group, WADA and Pan Am Sports have an agreement to carry out a pilot study during the Games. Specifically, the study seeks to validate a survey method among athletes during the Games with the objective of developing a tool or set of tools to estimate the prevalence of doping in sports and countries; and, to enable measurement of the impact of anti-doping policies and actions on the prevalence of doping over time.

THE IO AND AO TEAM MEMBERS

The IO Team – Pan Am Games

  • Ilaria Baudo (Chair), WADA
  • Juan Manuel Lauria (Team Manager), WADA
  • Saul Salcedo, National Anti-Doping Organization of Panama
  • Andrés Gonzalez, National Anti-Doping Organization of Chile

The AO Team – Pan Am Games

  • Stacy Spletzer-Jegen (Team Manager), WADA
  • Edna Serra, WADA

Phase 1:

  • Patricia Esposito, National Anti-Doping Organization of Guatemala
  • Patrick Werleman, National Olympic Committee of Aruba
  • Carolina Joly, IOC Youth Change Maker, National Olympic Committee of Panama

Phase 2:

  • Jorge Laurence, National Anti-Doping Organization of Argentina
  • Paulina de la Loza, National Anti-Doping Organization of Mexico
  • Christopher Thompson, Bahamas Anti-Doping Commission

The AO Team – Parapan Am Games

  • Edna Serra (Team Manager), WADA
  • Elizabeth Gimenez, National Anti-Doping Organization of Paraguay
  • Cathlyn Pistolas, United States Anti-Doping Agency
  • Adriana Taboza, National Anti-Doping Organization of Brazil

15/07/19 WADA PUBLISHES LATEST DRAFT VERSIONS OF THE 2021 CODE AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Dear Colleagues, 

On 12 December 20174 June 2018 and 10 December 2018 respectively, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) launched the three phases of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code Review Process(2021 Code Review Process), which also involves review of the International Standards (Standards).

Today, the Agency is pleased to publish:

I. The third draft of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) 
II. The second drafts of the International Standards (where applicable)
III. The revised Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights (Charter)

These updated versions of the Code, Standards and Charter follow careful consideration of all recommendations and feedback received during the three phases of the 2021 Code Review Process, which came to an end on 4 March 2019. They were submitted to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board) at their respective meetings on 15 and 16 May 2019.

The whole review process will culminate with approval of the final drafts at WADA’s next World Conference on Doping in Sport, which is to be held in Katowice, Poland in November 2019; after which, the revised 2021 Code and Standards will take effect on 1 January 2021.

I. CODE

Following the third phase of stakeholder consultation on the 2021 Code, the Agency is pleased to publish:The third draft of the Code following the third review phaseTwo Redline versions of the Code (third draft v second draft and third draft v current Code)The Summary of major proposed changes following the third consultation phaseThe Comments received from stakeholders during the third consultation phaseThe Comments received on the Code, Standards and Charter from the Olympic Movementduring the third consultation phaseII. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Following the second phase of stakeholder consultation on the Standards, the Agency is pleased to publish:

1.  The International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase2.  The International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase3.  The International Standard for Education (ISE)Clean version of the third draftRedline version (third draft v second draft)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase4.  The International Standard for Results Management (ISRM). This Standard is currently undergoing a second consultation phase following the presentation of the second draft at the May 2019 ExCo meeting. The most recent documents are listed below:Clean version of the second draftRedline version (second draft v first draft)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the first consultation phase5. The International Standard for the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information (ISPPPI)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase6.  The International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase7.  The International Standard for Laboratories (ISL). This version (10.0) of the Standard was approved at WADA’s May 2019 Board meeting, following a third phase of consultation requested by the WADA ExCo in November 2018. The consultation phase ran from 10 December 2018 to 4 March 2019 along with the other Standards. Version 10.0 will come into force on 1 November 2019 but will undergo further revision in 2020 to bring it in line with the 2021 Code. As such, a consultation phase will take place from December 2019 to March 2020. The most recent documents are listed below:  Clean version (10.0)Redline version (current version 10.0 v November 2018 version 10.0)Summary of major changesComments received from stakeholders during the third consultation phase8.  The International Standard for the Prohibited List is not part of the review process as it is reviewed annually via a separate stakeholder consultation.

[Note: At this point, the Code and Standard documents are available in English only.]

III.  ANTI-DOPING CHARTER OF ATHLETE RIGHTS

Following the first and only round of stakeholder consultation of the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights, which is being developed by WADA’s Athlete Committee, the Agency is pleased to publish: Clean version of the second draft Redline versionSummary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders [Note: The second draft of the Charter is also available in French and Spanish.]

WADA would like to thank all stakeholders for their feedback during the 2021 Code Review Process. The high quality of stakeholder feedback that was collected during the Review was instrumental to ensuring that the Code and Standards be further strengthened in protection of clean sport.

The Agency also wishes to advise stakeholders that while the official consultation phases are now over – with the exception of the ISRM (which is currently undergoing a second consultation phase) and the ISL (which will undergo further revision and stakeholder consultation as explained above) – the drafting teams will continue to accept comments and/or feedback from stakeholders to ensure that the 2021 Code and Standards, which will be further discussed by WADA’s ExCo at its last meeting before the World Conference (on 23 September in Tokyo) are as robust and comprehensive as possible.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


12/07/19 WADA’S 2018 TESTING FIGURES REPORT: FOR ADO REVIEW

Dear Colleagues,

Article 14.5 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) stipulates that the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) shall act as a central clearinghouse for Doping Control Testing data and results. Accordingly, on an annual basis, the Agency publishes reports which consolidate data that have been reported by WADA-accredited laboratories via the Agency’s Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS).

Today, we are pleased to provide WADA’s 2018 Testing Figures Report, which is broken down into the following four sub-reports. They represent analyses conducted by the WADA-accredited laboratories in 2018, in- and out-of-competition, for urine, blood and the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP).

The sub-reports are:Laboratory reportSport reportTesting Authority reportABP (blood analysis)WADA is providing you, Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs), with these reports in advance of their public distribution, inviting you to review your respective testing data and verify the data via ADAMS. We would ask you to provide comments no later than 26 July 2019 via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online consultation platform. Easy to use, WADAConnect will prompt you to create a user account and input your comments.

[For further information related to WADAConnect, please refer to the simple user guide.]

Furthermore, and in order to facilitate this process, the Agency would encourage you to refer to the Reporting Guide to Monitor Testing, which will guide you in compiling and verifying your respective results in ADAMS, including the Adverse Analytical Findings (AAFs) and Atypical Findings (ATFs) related to samples from your testing programs.

Should you have any questions regarding the Testing Figures Report, please contact statistics@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your cooperation and remain available to respond to any questions that you may have in this regard.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


10/07/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2018 MONITORING PROGRAM FIGURES

Dear Colleagues,

Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the 2018 Monitoring Program Figures, which provides data for substances by sport which were not on the 2018 Prohibited List but that were monitored during 2018 in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport; and, potential inclusion on the Prohibited List.

Article 4.5 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) states that “WADA, in consultation with signatories [of the Code] and governments, shall establish a monitoring program regarding substances which are not on the Prohibited List, but which WADA wishes to monitor in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport. […] WADA shall make available to International Federations and National Anti-Doping Organizations, on at least an annual basis, aggregate statistical information by sport regarding the additional substances.”

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


09/07/19 WADA HIGHLIGHTS PROCESS FOR REGISTERING AND SUBMITTING INTERVENTIONS FOR THE WORLD CONFERENCE

Dear Colleagues,

On 21 March, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) opened registration for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, which will take place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland. Today, WADA is pleased to highlight the process for registering and submitting interventions for the World Conference.

Just as the entire 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Review Process has been open and collaborative, it is important that WADA affords delegates the opportunity to intervene publicly during the Conference Plenary Sessions related to the Code.

Please note that only delegates can publicly intervene; and that, priority will be given to those that register to intervene prior to the Conference. Due to the high number of interventions expected, they will be limited to three minutes each. In the event that more intervention requests are received than available slots, WADA will be required to prioritize the interventions and/or possibly shorten the time offered.

For delegates:

  1. To register interventions

Delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Plenary Sessions (related to the Code) should register their interest via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 4 October 2019.

The same process applies to delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Side Sessions of the Conference where the focus will be on the various International Standards and the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights.

  1. To submit interventions

Delegates who wish to make an intervention in Katowice are strongly encouraged to provide an advance copy of their written document in English and/or French via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 21 October 2019.

Written documents should be a maximum of two A4 (or letter size) pages in length (approximately 400-500 words).

All documents will be posted on the Conference website as soon as possible after the relevant session.

For non-delegate participants:

While non-delegate participants are welcome to submit a written contribution (via e-mail to worldconference2019@wada-ama.org), the Agency will not be able to accommodate these submissions with an intervention slot during the Conference Plenary Sessions.

Subject to available time, non-delegate participants may be able to deliver an intervention during the Conference Side Sessions. It is intended that non-delegate submissions will also be posted on the Conference website after the relevant session, regardless whether an intervention slot was afforded or not.

Please note that the full intervention registration and submission process can be found on the World Conference website.

Should you have any questions regarding the intervention process, or general inquiries regarding the event, please refer to the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


05/06/19 WADA PUBLISHES OFFICIAL PROGRAM FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Dear Colleagues,

Further to our communication of 21 March, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the official Conference Program including session descriptions, for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport that will take place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland. Registration for the event is already open.

Organized with the generous support of the Ministry of Sport and Tourism of the Republic of Poland, the Conference is set to convene representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media to take stock of the evolution of Clean Sport and engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program.

This year’s World Conference will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) review and will culminate with presentation and endorsement of the proposed Code and International Standards. The Conference will conclude with the election by WADA’s Foundation Board of the new WADA President and Vice President that will assume their new roles on 1 January 2020.

Should you wish to register for the World Conference, please do so on the Conference website no later than 30 August 2019. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the Conference’s program; goals and objectives; intervention registration and submission; as well as, participation terms.

Should you have any questions regarding the event, please refer to the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


29/05/19 WADA LAUNCHES ALPHA 2.0 ANTI-DOPING eLEARNING COURSE FOR ATHLETES

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to launch an updated version of the Athlete Learning Program about Health and Anti-Doping (ALPHA) course on its Anti-Doping e-Learning Platform (ADeL).

Initially launched in 2014 – and developed with the help of athletes, leading psychologists, behavioral scientists, education technologists, e-learning specialists and prevention specialists – ALPHA represents a holistic, values-based approach and offers a pragmatic and positive alternative to the traditional approach to the prevention of doping. The course has already been successfully completed by over 22,500 of ADeL’s 35,000 subscribers.

The new ALPHA 2.0 preserves the course’s original content but adopts a fresh new look and feel, along with improved interactive activities. The updated course also includes athlete testimonial videos, which provide a point of reference and are proven to be an effective means of peer learning. The course is initially being launched in English with the other 5 ALPHA languages (French, Croatian, Japanese, Spanish and Slovenian) to follow this year. ALPHA 1.0 remains available for everyone in all languages.

The updated ALPHA 2.0 has been broken down into eight digestible lessons, taking approximately 10 minutes to complete each one. The course aims to improve retention and meet the needs of the modern learner for bite-size courses. ALPHA 2.0 is also mobile-friendly so athletes will be able to easily access the course through their smart phones or tablets.

The course’s first six lessons address the World Anti-Doping Code’s requirement for athletes to be educated on the following:

Doping control
Whereabouts
Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs)
Results management processes
Medical reasons not to dope, and
Ethical reasons not to dope

Lessons seven and eight offer practical help on how to stay clean and how to resist the pressure to dope, which encourages athletes to develop positive and proactive plans to avoid doping in a way that is particularly meaningful for them.

The end of the course features The Play True Pledge, which allows athletes to demonstrate publicly their commitment to clean sport by sharing The Pledge on their social media accounts. There is also a post-course test to assess the knowledge of the athletes – a score of 80% or higher is required for certification.

To access the ALPHA 2.0 course, simply register on ADeL or log in to your existing account. If you register as an athlete, ALPHA 2.0 will be featured automatically on your home page. For other roles, you can find the course in the Library section. In order to help users navigate through the platform, WADA has also created an ADeL User Guide, which should help users fully benefit from the ADeL platform.

For any questions or to provide feedback on ALPHA 2.0 or other ADeL resources, please direct your emails to adel@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


06/05/19 2020 WADA PROHIBITED LIST: STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION

Montreal, 1 May 2019

Dear Colleagues,

Annually, there is an agreed process for reviewing content and structural changes to the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (Prohibited List), which is an International Standard under Article 4.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

As part of this process, stakeholder feedback is collected throughout the year; and then, in April of every year, WADA’s List Expert Group meets to discuss the feedback, evidence and proposed content and/or structural changes, and to formulate the draft Prohibited List.

On 11 and 12 April, the List Expert Group held a meeting that resulted in the following documents, which we are confidentially giving you access to today for Stakeholder Consultation, via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online stakeholder consultation platform:

Draft 2020 Prohibited List
Summary of Modifications, which is intended to facilitate your review
2020 Monitoring Program

As is customary, WADA kindly asks that someone within your organization, with the relevant professional experience and expertise in anti-doping, be given the opportunity to carefully review the draft 2020 Prohibited List and provide comments concerning the proposed content (additions, subtractions or other modifications) and/or structural changes. We would ask that, whenever possible, your comments be supported by relevant reference(s) to medical or scientific evidence; pharmacological effect; and/or, personal experience concerning the substances or methods in question.

Also, as was done last year, the WADAConnect platform will encourage you, separately, to propose further additions, subtractions or other modifications under ‘Comments for future consideration’; which will be evaluated and considered carefully over the course of the year but will not likely be incorporated within the 2020 Prohibited List.

To provide comments

Simply connect to WADAConnect. If you do not currently have access, please consult the short guide on how to create a user account that is available on the platform.
Once you have a user account, please inform violet.maziar@wada-ama.org and ask to be added to the private List Consultation Group. This is necessary in order to provide comments.
Please input your comments by 12 July 2019.

We believe that conducting this Stakeholder Consultation helps ensure that the Prohibited List evolves in step with the highest possible scientific standards; and, reflects the needs of the anti-doping community.

In keeping with the annual process, the 2020 Prohibited List will not be made public until 1 October 2019. Therefore, we would ask you to ensure that the draft is kept confidential in order to preserve the integrity of the Stakeholder Consultation process. As we know, earlier publication would compromise the process and lead to confusion in the minds of athletes and other stakeholders worldwide.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact violet.maziar@wada-ama.org.

Thank you in advance for your organization’s feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


06/05/19 WADA APPOINTS AMANDA HUDSON AS DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Amanda Hudson as WADA’s new Director of Education, effective 5 August 2019.

Ms. Hudson, who is currently Head of Education for UK Anti-Doping in London, will lead the development and implementation of WADA’s education strategy, programs and activities, including managing WADA’s Social Science Research Grant Program and the Agency’s Education Committee.

In October 2018, Director of Communications, Catherine MacLean, assumed leadership of the education portfolio and set out to recruit a Deputy Director of Education to help develop and drive WADA’s education strategy. Due to the quality of the applications received during the recruitment phase, management decided to upgrade the role to Director, carving education out as a stand-alone department with a seat at the management table. This optimized structure reflects the increasing importance with which WADA and its stakeholders view the areas of both education and communications to the Agency and the global anti-doping program.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “I am delighted that Amanda will be joining WADA to take on this important mandate as the Director of Education. With almost 15 years connected to sport, nine of which with UKAD, Amanda brings with her a wealth of experience in developing and delivering excellent anti-doping education programs. Her strategic approach and leadership are exactly what we need to bring this core business activity to the next level.

“WADA’s success depends on its 100+ team of committed and skilled individuals. This appointment will reinforce WADA’s Management Team and will help the Agency deliver on its mission for athletes and other stakeholders in 2019 and beyond.”

Amanda Hudson will be located at WADA’s head office in Montreal, Canada. Until Ms. Hudson’s arrival in August, Ms. MacLean will maintain leadership of Education in addition to Communications.


01/05/19 WADA SUCCESSFULLY RETRIEVES SAMPLES FROM MOSCOW LABORATORY

Montreal, 30 April 2019 – Since January’s retrieval by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) of the analytical data generated by the former Moscow Laboratory in Russia, WADA Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) has been working on a mission to extract all relevant samples still contained within the laboratory.

WADA can confirm that a five-person team has successfully retrieved 2,262 samples from the laboratory, which had been split into A and B samples and contained within 4,524 collection bottles. The samples have now been taken out of Moscow and are on their way to a WADA-accredited laboratory outside of Russia. Importantly, all samples targeted by I&I in advance of the mission were successfully located and extracted.

WADA Director of I&I Gunter Younger, who is leading the process, said: “WADA Intelligence and Investigations is pleased to be continuing to make progress in this complex and difficult case. Extracting the required samples from the laboratory is another step forward. These samples will be used to strengthen cases against those who may have cheated and may exonerate athletes who have not committed an anti-doping rule violation.”

“In removing the bottles, as a precaution we decided to take any and all samples that corresponded to data in the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) database that was even remotely anomalous, even where an anti-doping rule violation (ADRV) was not suspected. We can therefore proceed to the next phase and support the various International Federations (IFs) and other Anti-Doping Organizations to bring cases forward.”

In parallel, the authentication process of the Moscow data is close to completion. In early May, a progress report from that process will be sent to the independent Compliance Review Committee – which has received updates from WADA I&I every two weeks since the data was extracted in January – and an update will be presented at the next meetings of WADA’s Executive Committee and Foundation Board on 15 and 16 May, respectively.

Meanwhile, the process continues as I&I investigators identify all available evidence for each case, including ordering further sample analysis, where appropriate. In due course, the relevant IFs will be presented with evidentiary packages, which they will assess with the view to taking the cases forward as ADRVs. In cases where IFs choose not to take action, WADA will review the facts, discuss with the relevant IF and reserves the right to bring them forward to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Last week, WADA held a conference call with a number of IFs outlining the next steps and answering any questions they might have. Similar conference calls have also been held with athletes and with National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs).

Background: The successful data and sample retrieval came about as a result of the 20 September 2018 decision of WADA’s Executive Committee to reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA), under strict conditions, to the list of World Anti-Doping Code-compliant Signatories. Under the terms of that decision, the Russian authorities were required to provide the data while also agreeing that any samples required by WADA for re-analysis would be made available by 30 June 2019. The samples had been stored and sealed off as part of a federal investigation being carried out by Russian authorities.

Further information: WADA has produced a flowchart that summarizes the three phases of the RUSADA Compliance Process and has compiled a document that summarizes the ‘Progress of the Anti-Doping System in Light of the Russian Doping Crisis’.


30/04/19 WADA LAUNCHES THERAPEUTIC USE EXEMPTION CHECKLISTS

Montreal, 29 April 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to launch a series of Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) Checklists to provide guidance and support to athletes, their physicians and Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) during the TUE application process.

These new Checklists are based on the TUE Committee Guidelines (TUEC Guidelines) (Medical Information to Support the Decisions of TUECs documents); which were developed by WADA and external medical specialists primarily for TUECs. The Checklists – which cover the most commonly seen conditions – list the requirements for completing the TUE Application Form, including the medical evidence that must be submitted along with it.

Following a successful pilot project with a number of National Anti-Doping Organizations and International Federations over the last few months, we now invite all ADOs to use the Checklists in their interactions with athletes and applying physicians. We also invite stakeholders to adapt the official English versions by translating and customizing them as necessary – while ensuring that the key elements remain.

ADOs interested in making their translations available on WADA’s website are strongly encouraged to do so and to send their translations to medical@wada-ama.org by 17 May 2019. We will be posting all TUE checklists on the WADA website after this date.

We thank you in advance for your efforts and collaboration in adopting these Checklists. Should you have any questions or wish to provide feedback, please contact medical@wada-ama.org.


25/04/19 WADA WELCOMES SIGNIFICANT DECISION BY COURT OF ARBITRATION FOR SPORT

Montreal, 24 April 2019 – A newly developed method for detecting the use of prohibited substances in athletes has led to a significant and unprecedented 29 March 2019 decision by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in favour of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

CAS issued a final award confirming Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) in the cases of the Ukrainian track and field athletes, Olesia Povh and Olha Zemliak. Both athletes were convicted of using a prohibited substance based on the detection of non-physiological levels of testosterone in their blood serum samples following analysis in the WADA-accredited laboratories in Lausanne, Switzerland, and Seibersdorf, Austria.

The testing was initiated by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). This led to the subsequent investigation, which resulted in these important convictions. The measurement of testosterone levels in blood serum constitutes a further tool for Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) to detect and prosecute doping, even where urine samples might be reported as negative.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA welcomes this decision by CAS, which could have a long-term positive impact on clean sport. I would also like to commend the AIU for their excellent work which led to this outcome. The decision sets an important precedent and this new method of detecting doping represents another way for ADOs to secure Anti-Doping Rule Violations against those who choose to cheat. It is a significant victory for clean sport and for athletes around the world.”

Significantly, CAS ruled that there could be no doubt on the evidence that the method used in measuring testosterone in blood serum was scientifically valid, paving the way for further examples of this method being used in the future.

Olesia Povh was sanctioned with a four-year period of ineligibility for intentional doping while Olha Zemliak received an eight-year period of ineligibility as it was her second violation.


07/04/19 WADA HAILS 30th ANNIVERSARY OF COUNCIL OF EUROPE ANTI-DOPING CONVENTION

Athens, 5 April 2019 – Yesterday, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Director General, Olivier Niggli, addressed a two-day conference in Athens, Greece, being held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Council of Europe’s Anti-Doping Convention (Convention).

This year marks three decades since the Convention was open for signature – a treaty that has now been ratified by all 47 Council of Europe member countries and several other states. Arriving 10 years before WADA was formed, the Convention helped to prepare the way for the Agency’s work by standardizing and harmonizing measures to tackle doping across all boundaries.

Olivier Niggli told the conference that while the success of the Convention and many other measures in protecting clean sport were clear, now was not the time for complacency.

“Without a doubt there is much more work to be done and improvements to be made,” he said. “The fight against doping is not static. It evolves every day and none of us should rest on our laurels. Together, the Council of Europe, Member States, WADA, UNESCO, the Sport Movement and all other players within the anti-doping community must go further by improving our methods, our rules, our science, our monitoring, our education programs, our investigative capabilities and much more.

“The input of governments, such as those represented at this important conference, is paramount to going further and making a difference. We need them as a crucial part of the team. The athletes make all of us proud every day through their hard efforts, their excellence and their dedication. They act as role models for the youth and make their nations’ flags fly on the world stage. We owe them our full commitment – to protect them and the sports they love.

“Over the years, WADA has been working very closely with the Council of Europe on a range of issues, including matters related to monitoring the compliance of anti-doping programs. This partnership has allowed for a crossover of important expertise, which benefits both organizations in increasing their respective efficiency while avoiding duplication of resources.

“On behalf of WADA, I wish to thank Europe for their commitment, their investment and their relentless efforts in protecting clean sport and society.”


03/04/19 WADA INVITES STAKEHOLDERS TO CELEBRATE “PLAY TRUE DAY” ON 10 APRIL

Montreal, 2 April 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites all of its stakeholders to join WADA in celebrating ‘Play True Day’ on 10 April along with fellow athletes, National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, Sports Federations, Major Event Organizers and other anti-doping stakeholders from around the world.

‘Play True Day’ is dedicated to clean sport and is intended to raise awareness among athletes, the sporting public and others about the global fight against doping. The inspiration for this initiative stems from a WADA-hosted Education Conference in 2013, which was attended by 17 South American countries that were the driving force behind 10 April being declared ‘Play True Day’. While it started as a small South American initiative, over the years, this grassroots movement has gained momentum with numerous organizations and countries from across the globe taking part.

In a spirit of solidarity among the anti-doping community, we invite you to join WADA and others by celebrating ‘Play True Day’ on your digital and social media platforms using one of the branded frames WADA has created especially for the day. Alternatively, you may wish to innovate and create your own Play True Day frame with a unique twist based on your specific sport or country. We also invite you all to use the hashtag #PlayTrueDay both in the leadup to and on the day in order to maximize the impact of the event on social media.

Also, should you have any queries or events/videos etc. that you would like to promote, please visit the Play True Day Website, or feel free to contact Nina Makuc from the Slovenian NADO at nina.makuc@sloado.si, who has been a true champion of the cause.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


16/03/19 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION PROCESS REGARDING THE TECHNICAL DOCUMENT FOR BLOOD ANALYTICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ATHLETE BIOLOGICAL PASSPORT (TD2019BAR)

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) launches a stakeholder consultation process to refine and revise the Technical Document for Blood Analytical Requirements for the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) (TD2019BAR). This Technical Document harmonizes the analysis of blood samples collected for the measurement of individual athlete blood markers within the framework of the ABP.

Stakeholders are invited to review the TD2019BAR and provide comments by 1 April 2019, using WADA’s online consultation platform, WADAConnect.

Once the consultation process is completed, stakeholders will be advised that the new TD2019BAR is to replace the TD2018BAR that is currently in force.

WADA’s Technical Documents provide specific technical recommendations to Anti-Doping Organizations and WADA-accredited laboratories. The Documents are refined and revised in consultation with WADA stakeholders.

For any questions related to the above, we invite you to contact athletepassport@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


20/03/19 WADA DETAILS ITS ENHANCED CONTINUOUS MONITORING PROGRAM FOR SIGNATORIES TO THE WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE

Dear Colleagues,

In 2016, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) initiated development of its ISO9001:2015 certified Compliance Monitoring Program; and since 2017, WADA has been monitoring Signatories’ compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) mainly through the Code Compliance Questionnaire (CCQ) and the Signatory Audit program.

So far, WADA has issued Corrective Action Reports (CARs) to all 307 Signatories that received and completed the CCQ; and, work is ongoing with a number of Signatories. In addition, WADA has conducted around 30 audits on both International Federations (IFs) and National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs), with a total of 19 audits planned for 2019.

We wish to thank all Signatories for the energy and efforts that have been put into the implementation of the corrective actions, which contribute significantly to protecting the integrity of sport worldwide.

Given that the next CCQ will not be issued until early 2022 to assess the implementation of the revised Code and International Standards, which will come into effect on 1 January 2021; in early 2019, WADA launched an enhanced “Continuous Monitoring Program” for Code Signatories, which we wish to detail for you today. In short, the Continuous Monitoring Program includes the following elements:

Monitoring the entry of Doping Control Forms (DCFs) into the Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS). Since the introduction of this initiative, DCF entry has increased globally from 60% in 2015 to 98% today. Nonetheless, as a reminder, it is critical that Signatories enter DCFs into ADAMS within 15 business days of sample collection to enable a meaningful steroidal and haematological Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) program to operate worldwide; to facilitate coordinated test distribution planning; and, to avoid unnecessary duplication in testing by Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs);
Monitoring Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) applications and decisions, both in terms of timely input into ADAMS (TUE decisions within 15 business days after the TUE Committee makes its decision) and the quality of submissions provided;
Monitoring Results Management cases to ensure that due process is followed and cases are closed in a timely fashion;
Conducting remote, post-audit review of Signatories previously audited, to ensure that compliance is maintained and does not revert back following a WADA audit;
Issuing Mandatory Information Requests (MIRs) under Article 8.6 of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS), if needed, to ensure compliance of activities associated with Critical or High Priority requirements; and
Monitoring ABP programs.

The purpose of the Continuous Monitoring Program is to bridge the gap between the CCQ issued in 2017 and the next release planned in early 2022, to ensure compliance of anti-doping programs worldwide and to maintain athlete confidence in the global anti-doping system.

In addition to these activities, WADA is also implementing a compliance monitoring program tailored towards the activities of Major Event Organizations (MEOs). This program will be introduced to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and International Paralympic Committee (IPC) in advance of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Requests and reminders to Signatories

As WADA rolls out the full Compliance Monitoring Program, Signatories may receive requests and reminders from different WADA departments and will continue to receive support from WADA, including from the Regional Offices. WADA will aim to ensure that the messaging is coordinated as much as possible; however, we thank Signatories in advance for responding to the relevant departments within the deadlines provided. While we conduct this program in a cooperative spirit, we wish to remind you that under the ISCCS, if deadlines are missed, the Signatory may be reported to WADA’s internal Compliance Taskforce, which may result in it being asserted non-compliant by the Executive Committee following a recommendation from the external, independent Compliance Review Committee.

Upcoming ADAMS enhancements to assist Signatories

To support Signatories with their compliance responsibilities, a number of new functions will be released in ADAMS as the ADAMS Next Gen project progresses. In particular, a new Test Distribution Plan (TDP) and Technical Document for Sport Specific Analysis (TDSSA) monitoring tool will be introduced in the coming weeks, which will enhance the efficiency of Signatories monitoring their TDP and TDSSA compliance in real-time.

Update on WADA’s Compliance Monitoring Program

In addition to the excellent response from Signatories to increasing DCF entry in ADAMS from 60% in 2015 to 98% today, the following are some of the numerous collective achievements WADA wishes to share with Signatories:

Over 3,700 corrective actions have been implemented by Signatories to date following receipt of their CCQ Corrective Action Report (CAR).
Over 540 corrective actions have been implemented by Signatories to date following receipt of their audit CAR.
Several countries have introduced new legislation or amended their existing legislation to enhance their anti-doping programs through the Compliance Monitoring Program.
Under WADA’s enhanced Compliance Monitoring Program, only five Signatories have been declared non-compliant and three of these have been reinstated, thanks mainly to enhanced cooperation and coordination with WADA and other stakeholders.
Several Signatories have entered into partnerships with other Signatories to enhance their anti-doping programs.

WADA would like to thank all Signatories for the significant collective effort to date and looks forward to working with all involved in the continued development of the global anti-doping program.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns that you may have at compliance@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


21/02/19 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS REVIEW THE MAIN FOCUS AT 2019 WADA ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

ATHLETE SESSION BRINGS TOGETHER MORE THAN 70 ATHLETES AND ATHLETE REPRESENTATIVES TO DISCUSS
CURRENT ISSUES AND PRIORITIES

Lausanne, 14 March 2019 – A crucial review of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and its associated International Standards, as well as compliance and capturing athletes’ views were among the main themes at the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) 15th Annual Symposium held this week in Lausanne, Switzerland.

The WADA Symposium, which is the leading fixture on the anti-doping calendar, gathered close to 900 delegates from the global anti-doping community for two days of presentations, interviews, panel discussions, practical workshops and networking sessions. Athlete representatives, International Sports Federations, government representatives, National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, Major Event Organizers, WADA-accredited laboratories and Athlete Passport Management Units, as well as international media and other stakeholders, gathered on 13 and 14 March under the theme “Towards 2021 – Navigating the Future Together”.

2021 will be the year when the latest revised and updated Code comes into effect and the world’s anti-doping stakeholders are currently finalizing the document in time for its ratification at the fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, which will take place in November in Katowice, Poland. In addition, the Code’s various International Standards, including those related to results management, education, compliance, testing and investigations, therapeutic use exemptions, laboratories and privacy protection were discussed at length during the Symposium.

Athletes were well represented during the conference. In particular, around 75 athlete leaders gathered from around the world for a one-and-a-half-day session for them and their representatives. The session, which was hosted by WADA’s Athlete Committee, for the first time as part of the Agency’s Annual Symposium, reinforced the importance of athletes’ involvement in clean sport. Specifically, the session addressed topics such as increased athlete representation within WADA’s governance structure, the impact the proposed changes in the 2021 draft Code may have on athletes, and the upcoming launch of ADAMS Next Gen – the latest revamped and improved version of the system.

A Symposium highlight came as WADA’s Athlete Committee members Beckie Scott (Chair) and Ben Sandford gave an update in plenary session on the progress of the development of the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights, a topic that was also discussed at length during the athlete session.

The keynote address by WADA President Sir Craig Reedie on day one, entitled ‘Unity Will Be Our Strength’, set the tone for the Symposium as he reflected on the Russian doping scandal and on the progress made since the Executive Committee (ExCo) decision in September 2018 to reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) as compliant with the Code.

Sir Craig noted that the all-important data recovered from the Moscow Laboratory in January this year, once authenticated, would be used to bring more cheats to justice for the good of clean sport while exonerating others. He also pointed out that the Russian scandal had prompted the establishment of new priorities and led to significant changes that had already equipped the Agency to better navigate situations of non-compliance with the Code, including the coming into force on 1 April 2018 of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS), which has considerably strengthened WADA’s legal framework around cases of non-compliance.

Sir Craig said: “In light of events that have occurred since the ExCo decision on RUSADA was made last September, it has been proven to be the right course of action. It is inarguable that accessing the laboratory data was a major step forward in this saga. Now we need to make sure this 24 terabytes of data is both complete and authentic.

“In case anyone had any doubts about the usefulness of the data from the Moscow Laboratory, some recent decisions from the Court of Arbitration for Sport put that into sharp focus and reinforced the importance of ensuring that due process is followed and that evidence is carefully presented.

“We are resolutely moving forward in our determination to protect clean sport. To continue to make impactful progress on all fronts, we need to work in partnership with everyone involved in anti-doping, whether that is athletes, National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, sports federations, governments, scientists, medical experts, educators and others. Division helps nobody except those trying to cheat. Unity will be our strength.”

Sir Craig went on to highlight enhanced intelligence and investigations activity as well as the ongoing success of WADA’s Speak Up! whistleblower program. He then flagged that WADA’s increased activities in these areas are being helped by the May 2018 decision of the Foundation Board to approve 8% budget increases for 2019-22.

WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, took delegates through WADA’s strategic priorities, which in addition to those outlined by Sir Craig, included in particular: harmonizing Code rules via the 2021 Code Review and simultaneous review of the International Standards; the implementation of wide-ranging governance reforms, increasing scientific and social science research; enhancing education, most notably through the development of an International Standard for Education; capacity building of Anti-Doping Organizations; and the ongoing overhaul of WADA’s Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS).

Niggli said: “The 2019 WADA Symposium has been a great opportunity for everyone in the anti-doping world to come together in a spirit of cooperation, to be brought up to date on the latest events and to influence the direction in which we are going.

“As the global regulator, this year’s Symposium has been very important for WADA as we put the finishing touches to the revised 2021 Code and associated International Standards that will be ratified at the World Conference on Doping in Sport later this year.”

Another highlight of the Symposium came on day one with a panel discussion entitled ‘Looking Back and Moving Forward Together’, which focused on improving the anti-doping system in light of the Russian crisis. Moderated by the CEO of British Rowing, Andy Parkinson, it featured representatives from the Caribbean Regional Anti-Doping Agency, the Government of Seychelles, UK Anti-Doping, the International Testing Agency, the United States Anti-Doping Agency and the Intelligence and Investigations Department of WADA.

With a backdrop of how the Russia situation affected the work of various anti-doping stakeholders, the lessons learned and the progress made since it came to light, the panel members discussed such issues as governance and funding of anti-doping bodies as well as the importance – and some of the goals and challenges – of scientific research, education, capacity building, compliance monitoring and investigations for the future integrity of sport.

Lastly, during the Symposium, participants heard a presentation on the consequences framework for the UNESCO Convention against Doping in Sport – currently in development – from Bram van Houten, Policy Adviser at the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports, and a subsequent panel session that included Per Nylykke from the Danish Ministry of Culture, and Khalid Galant, CEO of the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport.


20/02/19 FINAL REMINDER TO REGISTER FOR WADA’s 2019 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

Dear Colleagues,

Further to our communications of 29 November, 19 December and 4 February, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that the deadline to register for the 15th edition of its Annual Symposium, which will be held on Wednesday, 13 March, and Thursday, 14 March 2019, at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland, is 26 February.

Under the theme “Towards 2021 – Navigating the future together”, this year’s Symposium will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards review as we head towards November’s World Conference in Katowice, Poland. The event will also address the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights that is being developed by WADA’s Athlete Committee with the aim of including key principles within the 2021 Code.

REGISTRATION

Should you wish to register for the Symposium, please do so on the Symposium website by 26 February 2019. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the detailed agenda and how to register.

DELEGATE APP

Once registered, approved participants will receive a notification inviting them to download the delegate app. Via smartphone or tablet, the app will allow participants to access:

A personalized agenda with the session timings, locations and descriptions
Speaker biographies
A full list of participants
A floor plan and more event information

Also, delegates using the app will be able to add others to their “favorites” and can contact other participants directly to organize meetings in advance of the Symposium.

WADA encourages participants to make the most of this delegate app in order to maximize communications and networking opportunities in and around the event.

ATHLETE SESSION

This year’s Symposium will also feature a special one-and-a-half-day session for athletes and athlete representatives.

As outlined in the draft agenda, this session will include speakers, workshops and interactive information sessions dedicated to engaging and educating athletes. Important matters in anti-doping such as athlete representation within the anti-doping movement, the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights, the Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS), and much more will be covered and discussed.

WADA wishes to encourage all Anti-Doping Organizations to promote this event to their athletes and athlete representatives.

Please note that once approved, registration for athletes will be free.

HOTEL ACCOMMODATION

Please note that the deadline for booking Symposium-designated hotels at a preferential rate has passed. As the number of hotel rooms in Lausanne is limited, we strongly encourage you to book your accommodation as soon as possible by contacting Lausanne Tourisme.

WADA looks forward to welcoming participants in Lausanne.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency