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31/03/20 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION PROCESS REGARDING TECHNICAL LETTER ON ETHYLMORPHINE

Montreal, 31 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites stakeholders to participate in a consultation process regarding the new Technical Letter TL22 – Ethylmorphine. This document includes guidance regarding the detection of the threshold substance morphine at a concentration higher than the Decision Limit in urine samples, which may result from the administration of the permitted drug ethylmorphine.

Stakeholders are invited to review this Technical Letter and provide comments by 10 April 2020, using WADA’s online consultation platform, WADAConnect.

Under the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), WADA’s Technical Letters provide specific direction to WADA-accredited laboratories; WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport; and, other stakeholders on particular issues regarding the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures.

For any questions related to the above, we invite you to contact science@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


31/03/20 WADA REMOVES INTERNATIONAL TAEKWONDO FEDERATION FROM WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE NON-COMPLIANT LIST

Montreal, 31 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that, following a circular vote of its Executive Committee (ExCo), the Agency has today removed the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF) from the list of Signatories that are non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code.

The ITF was asserted non-compliant by WADA’s ExCo at its meeting of 23 September 2019, and this non-compliance became effective on 15 October 2019 after the ITF chose not to challenge the assertion of non-compliance, which was based on its failure to report to WADA on compliance by completing and submitting its Code Compliance Questionnaire (CCQ).

Since then, the ITF has implemented the corrective measure required to address its non-compliance, namely the completion and submission of the CCQ to WADA. A Corrective Action Report will be issued shortly by WADA following the review of the responses provided in the CCQ and the federation will be advised that continued cooperation will be required in order to maintain its compliant status.

[Please note that the ITF is not World Taekwondo, which is the Olympic federation for the sport of Taekwondo. ITF is a Signatory to the Code but is not recognized by the International Olympic Committee or the Global Association of International Sports Federations. There are currently three Code Signatory International Federations (IFs) for the sport of Taekwondo – World Taekwondo and two other IFs, both of which are called International Taekwondo Federation or ITF. The IF in this case is the ITF based in Austria. The two IFs called International Taekwondo Federation became Signatories to the Code prior to the adoption by WADA’s Executive Committee of a policy setting the conditions to be fulfilled by new organizations that wish to become Signatories.]


30/03/20 WADA PUBLISHES MEMBERSHIP OF STANDING COMMITTEES FOR 2020

Montreal, 30 March 2020 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the membership of WADA’s five Standing Committees for 2020, which was recently confirmed by the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) via circulatory voting. 

  1. Athlete Committee   
  2. Compliance Review Committee
  3. Education Committee
  4. Finance and Administration Committee     
  5. Health, Medical and Research Committee  

WADA President Witold Bańka said: “WADA is very grateful to the dozens of very able volunteers who provide their time and expertise to the Agency’s Standing Committees. The Committees play a key advisory role in policy and priority development for the Agency. The members’ commitment in applying their competencies is crucial to advancing the Agency’s mission as the leader of Clean Sport.”
 
The Standing Committee Chairs were appointed on 23 January 2020; and, following these appointments, the Committee memberships were then proposed to the ExCo for their approval, with new members taking office on or before 1 March.
 
In accordance with WADA’s Statutes concerning Standing Committee composition and rotation, on an annual basis, the Agency seeks nominations from its stakeholders for candidates to fill vacancies. The next call for vacancies (for 2021) will be released in May 2020.


27/03/20 WADA PUBLISHES INDEPENDENT OBSERVER TEAM REPORT FROM 2019 PAN AMERICAN GAMES

Montreal, 27 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published its Independent Observer (IO) Team’s Report regarding the anti-doping program at the 2019 Pan American (Pan Am) Games held in Lima, Peru, from 26 July to 11 August 2019.

As it has done for many major events since 2000, WADA sent a team to monitor the anti-doping program that was run by Pan Am Sports and the Lima 2019 Organizing Committee with the aim of reinforcing confidence in athletes and the public as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of the Games’ anti-doping program.

In addition to collaborating with Pan Am Sports and the Lima 2019 Organizing Committee, and providing general support prior to the Games, the team also provided real-time feedback during the Games designed to optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of the program in compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards.

Led by Ilaria Baudo, WADA Senior Manager, Standards and Harmonization, the four-person team was composed of experts in anti-doping from across the Americas who observed and provided feedback on all aspects of doping control. This included the implementation of general anti-doping policies and procedures; test distribution planning; implementation of the out-of-competition and in-competition testing programs; athlete selection and notification for testing; Therapeutic Use Exemptions procedures; sample collection procedures; the transport of samples and their chain of custody; and, the results management process – including hearings that were held during the IO Team’s presence.

Ms. Baudo said: “The WADA Independent Observer team would like to commend Pan Am Sports and the Lima 2019 Organizing Committee for the anti-doping program put in place during the 2019 Pan American Games. The organizers made particular efforts to increase risk-based and out-of-competition testing in the lead-up to the Pan Am Games, as well as implement recommendations made by the IO Team throughout the course of the Games. These efforts ensured both the effectiveness and integrity of the anti-doping program being implemented. We would particularly like to thank Dr. Bernardo Chernilo, President of the Medical Commission of Pan Am Sports, and its members, and Dr. Victor Carpio, Chief Executive Officer of the Comisión Nacional Antidopaje de Perú (CONAD), and his team, who were key to the success of the program.”

As is the case following all IO Team missions, the report includes a number of recommendations for Pan Am Sports and WADA itself – all designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future Games.


26/03/20 WADA PUBLISHES FIRST CODE COMPLIANCE ANNUAL REPORT

Montreal, 26 March 2020 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published its first-ever World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Compliance Annual Report for 2019 (Report), as well as WADA’s accompanying Compliance Strategy that was endorsed by WADA’s Executive Committee in late 2019(1).
 
One of WADA’s primary roles as the global regulatory body for anti-doping is to monitor effective implementation of the Code and its six(2) related International Standards (Standards) by over 350 Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) such as, National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs), International Federations (IFs) and Major Event Organizations.

WADA’s Chief Operating Officer, Frédéric Donzé, who oversees the Agency’s compliance activities, said: “WADA is pleased to publish its first-ever Compliance Annual Report for 2019. This Report is an element of the new Compliance Strategy and another important piece of WADA’s commitment to transparency. Among other objectives, the Report is intended to clearly outline the achievements and challenges of WADA’s Compliance Monitoring Program, which aims to reinforce the standard of Code Signatory organizations’ work worldwide.”   
 
Key findings of Signatory compliance monitoring for 2019
 
As outlined in the 26-page Report, the key findings of Signatory compliance monitoring for 2019 include the following:

  • WADA operated its compliance activities under the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS) and the accompanying Prioritization Policy for its first full year following its coming into force in April 2018.
     
  • Significant, high-profile, WADA-led investigations have contributed to a number of compliance activities by WADA departments, Standing Committees and governing bodies. In particular, the Russian investigation has required an unprecedented amount of human and financial resources.
     
  • WADA now has at its disposal a number of effective and robust compliance monitoring programs. In 2019, WADA launched three new compliance monitoring programs – the Major Event Organization (MEO) Code Compliance Questionnaire (CCQ), the Continuous Monitoring Program, and the Desk Audit Program.
     
  • Over 3,000 corrective actions were implemented by Signatories in 2019 with testing identified as the main source of non-conformities. Strategies have been developed to assist Signatories, including through a number of easy to use templates and checklists that are available on WADA’s Anti-Doping e-Learning platform (ADeL).
     
  • Unsurprisingly, a clear link between improving the quality of testing programs and financial resources has been identified. A better understanding of costs associated with quality testing programs is required to assist Signatories to increase their budgets and resources.
     
  • The creation of the International Testing Agency (ITA) – which is working with a growing number of IFs – and the implementation of partnerships between developed and developing NADOs have significantly contributed to the compliance of the relevant Signatories’ activities.

About the Report

The purpose of the Report is, in particular, to:

  • Provide a clear and integrated report outlining the achievements and challenges of the Compliance Monitoring Program, measuring objectives against key performance indicators through quantitative and qualitative analysis including areas for improvement.
     
  • Detail the interpretation and implications of the findings, trends and lessons learned over time towards ADO’s compliance maturity as defined in the Compliance Strategy.
     
  • Identify opportunities for continual improvement that will be the foundation for the following year’s Compliance Annual Plan. This cycle will be repeated annually as WADA seeks to develop compliance maturity through continual improvement of its own compliance activities and the global anti-doping system.

 Notes: 

(1) In light of the evolving situation with COVID-19, WADA and Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) worldwide are adjusting the way in which they conduct their daily anti-doping operations. Following consultation with ADOs and other stakeholders, on 20 March, WADA issued ADO Guidance, which is aimed at ensuring the health and safety of athletes and all those that are touched by anti-doping operations; and, protecting the integrity of the global anti-doping system. The Agency is conscious of the fact that COVID-19 will have impacts on the Compliance Strategy and Annual Plan referenced above, as well as on the conduct of anti-doping programs by Signatories worldwide, which will be monitored and considered accordingly. WADA’s Compliance Monitoring Program provides a level of flexibility and understanding based on the circumstances.
 
(2) Two additional Standards – on education and on results management – will be introduced in January 2021.


25/03/20 WADA WELCOMES DISMISSAL OF RUSSIAN CYCLISTS’ LAWSUIT

Montreal, 25 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) welcomes the recent decision by the Superior Court of Justice of Ontario, Canada, dismissing a lawsuit commenced by three Russian cyclists against WADA and Canadian Professor Richard H. McLaren, O.C.

The cyclists claimed damages they alleged to have suffered as a result of their exclusion from the 2016 Rio Olympic Games by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Specifically, they claimed that they were excluded from the Games as a result of the findings made by Professor McLaren in the Independent Person Report, commissioned by WADA, which considered allegations of widespread doping and manipulation of doping controls within Russia.

In response to the filing of the claim, WADA and Professor McLaren successfully brought motions for summary judgement dismissing the cyclists’ claim. The summary judgment motions were heard before the Hon. Justice Faieta in Toronto on 16 May 2019 and a ruling was issued on 11 February 2020. In granting summary dismissal, the court ruled that the issues raised by the Russian cyclists were essentially sports-related matters that fell within the exclusive jurisdiction of, and had to be resolved by, the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland. The court also held that the filing of the claim in Ontario was an abuse of process.

Specifically, the Hon. Justice Faieta held: “This was a dispute that the plaintiffs placed before the CAS for adjudication. Having failed to obtain a declaration from the IOC that they be granted entry to Rio 2016, the plaintiffs should not be permitted to re-litigate the factual matrix of this dispute in this court by dressing up it up as a tort claim.”

He added: “To allow this action to proceed would undermine the Olympic Movement and, in particular, the dispute resolution provisions found in the Olympic Charter by signaling to the international community that domestic courts are willing to entertain disputes that, at their core, are matters connected to the Olympic Games that should be determined exclusively by a specialized tribunal in accordance with the provisions of the Olympic Charter or other provisions approved by the IOC.”

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA welcomes the decision to dismiss this claim. It is an important ruling that upholds CAS decisions, which are accepted and supported by the entire sports movement. This judgement rightly closes the door on attempts to re-litigate matters through the filing of domestic claims.”

“I am pleased that this case is over. Our investigation was thorough, professional and our findings were beyond question,” said Professor McLaren, who teaches law at Western University in Ontario. “CAS is an independent institution specifically set up to resolve sports-related disputes. The plaintiffs’ claims always belonged there for resolution. Not in the provincial court system.”

Legal costs and disbursements were also awarded in favor of WADA and Professor McLaren. The appeal period has expired and this matter is at an end.


24/03/20 WADA STATEMENT ON OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC GAMES TOKYO 2020 POSTPONEMENT

Montreal, 24 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) supports the sensible decision of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee to postpone the Tokyo 2020 Games until next year.

WADA President Witold Bańka said: “The health and safety of the athletes remains the number-one priority for WADA and the anti-doping community, and it is clear that the correct decision has been taken in this challenging and unprecedented situation. As we all come to terms with the impact of this pandemic, it is clear that there are a number of challenges being faced related to the testing of athletes at this time. We will continue to monitor that situation to mitigate the effect of any interruptions to the program.”

As outlined in recent days, WADA is working closely with Anti-Doping Organizationsathletes and other stakeholders to ensure the integrity of the global anti-doping program is maintained as far as possible during this time and to ensure that the system returns to full power as quickly and effectively as possible once this crisis has abated. With an eye on 2021, WADA looks forward to collaborating with the IOC, the International Paralympic Committee, the local organizing committee and others to plan activities related to the Olympic and Paralympic Games, including pre-Games testing, education, the Independent Observer program and athlete outreach, which were in place for the 2020 Games that will now also be postponed. 


23/03/20 WADA RESPONDS TO ATHLETE QUERIES CONCERNING ANTI-DOPING IN LIGHT OF COVID-19

Montreal, 23 March 2020 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) responded to athlete queries concerning anti-doping in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic by publishing a Question and Answer (Q&A) document that it developed in consultation with its Athlete Committee. This follows on from WADA’s COVID-19 guidance that was issued on 20 March to Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) worldwide.
 
WADA President Witold Bańka said: “WADA and the global anti-doping community are prioritizing public health, safety and social responsibility. As we continue to meet the challenges of this pandemic, the health of athletes and all those involved in clean sport, will continue to be front-of-mind.
 
“WADA acknowledges how difficult this situation has been and will continue to be for athletes as they deal with the strict measures that have been put in place around the world, which are disrupting their training programs and creating uncertainty as to what is in store for their upcoming competitions. The anti-doping community has banded together to adjust its daily operations by suspending or reducing some of its programs, including testing and other activities. As difficult as this is for everyone, we must stay strong. We will get through this situation and everyone hopes that we can return the global anti-doping system to full power as soon as we emerge.”
 
Chair of the WADA Athlete Committee Ben Sandford said: “In these difficult times, we must all do our part to stay safe, keep others safe and look out for each other. We are athletes, but first of all we are human. It is important that we listen to our government health authorities and do our part to minimize the likelihood of transmission and impact on society. The situation clearly goes well beyond anti-doping and sport and this document is designed to address some specific concerns that athletes may have right now as we navigate the path ahead.
 
“Athletes should be aware that testing can continue where appropriate, where possible and with the necessary health and hygiene protocols in place. It is important to ensure the integrity of the overall system is maintained as much as possible. WADA will continue to identify any gaps in the program and advise relevant ADOs accordingly so that they can adjust their testing programs going forward.”
 
The Q&A covers issues such as:

  • Ongoing testing
  • Minimizing the risk of contracting or transmitting the virus
  • Filing of whereabouts information
  • Validating Therapeutic Use Exemptions
  • Maintaining the integrity of the anti-doping system
  • Refusing to comply with testers at this time

WADA will continue to liaise with athletes and ADOs in the interest of publishing updates regarding the Agency’s response to COVID-19 as the situation evolves.


20/03/20 WADA ISSUES ADO GUIDANCE IN CONNECTION
WITH COVID-19

Montreal, 20 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,
[Anti-Doping Organizations]

Since the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) last communicated to Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) on the matter of testing on 6 March, the SARS-Cov-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has continued to evolve into an even greater health and societal emergency that requires effective action by everyone around the world to minimize the likelihood of transmission and the impact on society.

WADA is monitoring the situation based on expert information from the World Health Organization and from other reliable sources. Most countries are putting strict measures in place, which include border closures, quarantine/self-isolation, cancellation of flights, social movement restrictions, etc. As a result, many sporting events have been cancelled or postponed. This has forced WADA and its stakeholders to adjust daily operations by instituting teleworking; and, in the case of many ADOs, suspending or reducing doping control programs (including testing and other activities).

Following the advice of government and health authorities

Throughout, the Agency has been urging all ADOs to follow the advice of government and health authorities to ensure proper protection of athletes and doping control personnel, while protecting the integrity of doping control programs, particularly in the lead-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. 

This remains the aim, and WADA’s vision of a world where all athletes can compete in a doping-free sporting environment remains the same. However, we all agree that the protection of public health must take precedence; and so, we must put stronger measures in place as a global anti-doping community.

In keeping with governmental measures that have been, and are being, put in place around the world, WADA has evaluated the global anti-doping program in collaboration with ADOs, including National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs), International Federations (IFs), Major Event Organizations (MEOs); and, other organizations such as the International Testing Agency (ITA) –— which is leading the pre-Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Task Force on behalf of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) –— as well as laboratories to determine how we, as a community, can best operate in this challenging environment.

Prioritizing health and safety for all

We are grateful to ADOs that have outlined how they are being impacted and what measures they are putting in place. Given the differences specific to each country, it is difficult to establish one overarching set of recommendations or guidelines. However, based on information and experience to date, WADA is recommending that ADOs consider the following ‘Guidance’ regarding key elements of the World Anti-Doping Program.

It is important to remember that, first and foremost, ADOs should follow the recommendations (or requirements) of their national government and health authorities related to all activities. If this information is not available, then ADOs may want to approach their government authorities to seek their guidance. While ADOs may be adjusting their operations given COVID-19, athletes continue to remain subject to all provisions of the World Anti-Doping Code and must comply accordingly.

Our overarching priority remains the same –— to ensure the health and safety of athletes and all those that are touched by our community’s operations. In order to do this and protect the integrity of the global anti-doping system, we must endeavor to take a coherent approach across the system, which demonstrates solidarity among the community; and, aims to give athletes confidence that they remain at the core of our mission. 

Accordingly, WADA encourages open and continuous dialogue amongst all its stakeholders so that we can continue to monitor and adjust. Should you have questions or concerns, please feel free to contact your respective WADA contact in Montreal or in one of the Agency’s regional offices. The Agency commits to support and communicate as required as we in the Clean Sport community navigate these difficult times together.

Best regards and stay healthy,

World Anti-Doping Agency


20/03/20 WADA UPDATES ITS COVID-19 GUIDANCE FOR ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATIONS

Montreal, 20 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has issued updated guidance for Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

WADA developed the guidance following consultation with ADOs, including National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs), International Federations and Major Event Organizations as well as other organizations, such as the International Testing Agency (which is leading the pre-Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Task Force on behalf of the International Olympic Committee) and accredited laboratories, to determine how the anti-doping community can best operate in this challenging environment.

The guidance was refined following a teleconference meeting today of the WADA NADO Advisory Group, which provides expert advice in promoting effective doping control strategies and plans.

The updated ADO guidance covers a number of areas that may be affected by COVID-19, including the provision of whereabouts information, sample collection and transport to laboratories, sample analysis, education programs, investigations, result management, therapeutic use exemptions, compliance and other activities and obligations covered by the World Anti-Doping Program. While the document provides guidance specific to athletes, WADA is developing another resource that will address some specific concerns raised by athletes, which we aim to publish early next week and which will be adapted over time.

At a time when most countries are putting in place strict measures, this new situation for all is undoubtedly affecting the anti-doping system. Border closures, mandatory quarantines or isolations, cancellations of flights, social movement restrictions, office closures and cancellation of sporting events are all hindering the normal day-to-day work of those involved in anti-doping.

WADA President Witold Bańka said: “The sports world is dealing with an unprecedented situation. COVID-19 has forced all anti-doping stakeholders, including WADA, to adjust the way daily operations are conducted. But this matter goes way beyond anti-doping and sport – it is a global emergency – and our first priority must be public health, safety and social responsibility.

“As we have done throughout this global crisis, WADA will continue to liaise with ADOs, providing leadership and support so that the health of all concerned can be protected and the integrity of the world anti-doping system can be maintained as much as possible. It will also be crucial that the system can return to full power as quickly as possible once the various restrictions are lifted.

“During this time, I would like to acknowledge how difficult it is for athletes, too, who face disruptions to their training programs and uncertainty as to what the future holds for their competitions.”

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA has developed this guidance in collaboration with, and with the support of ADOs and other key stakeholders, understanding that these are difficult times for sport. ADOs must, in the first instance, follow the directives and advice of their respective governments and health authorities in order to play their part in preventing the further spread of the virus. Athletes and everyone else involved in the anti-doping system can be assured that their health is our number-one concern.

“Athletes should also bear in mind that testing will continue only where appropriate and possible and, at this time, with the necessary health and hygiene protocols in place. The situation is changing every day.

“However, there are a number of other tools that are available to assist us in protecting clean sport during periods of limited testing. The Athlete Biological Passport, in particular, will continue to be an important program for us in the coming weeks and months, together with the long-term storage of samples collected before, during and after the pandemic, as well as the collection and review of any intelligence received that could lead to target testing, specific analysis or the opening of an investigation.”

WADA will continue to work closely with all ADOs to monitor anti-doping program implementation and encourages ADOs to continue to advise the Agency of any amendments that they are making to their wider programs so that WADA can coordinate, advise and assist as necessary.

Where it has been determined that there has been an absence or diminished level of testing on athletes in areas of higher risk, this information will be conveyed to ADOs that would benefit from such information so they can adjust their testing programs accordingly going forward. 

WADA will continue to publish updates regarding its response to COVID-19 as the situation evolves.


16/03/20 WADA UPDATE REGARDING ACCREDITED AND APPROVED LABORATORIES IN LIGHT OF COVID-19

Montreal, 16 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,
[Anti-Doping Organizations and Laboratories]

In connection with the COVID-19 pandemic, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to share some important information regarding WADA-accredited laboratories as well as those approved by WADA for blood analysis in connection with the Athlete Biological Passport.
 
Last week, four accredited laboratories, in Rome (Italy), Montreal (Canada), Madrid and Barcelona (Spain), indicated they were temporarily suspending operations due to the ongoing crisis. WADA anticipates that more laboratories, particularly in Europe, may follow suit.
 
WADA has been in touch with all four laboratories to ensure that the integrity of the anti-doping samples is maintained during this period of closure. To that end, any laboratory that makes the decision to suspend activities must:Inform its clients immediately of this decision and instruct them not to deliver any more samples for analysis if samples cannot be properly handled and stored.Establish a procedure whereby samples that are already on their way to the laboratory can be securely received and either redirected to another accredited laboratory or safely stored frozen for when the laboratory’s analytical activity resumes.Devise a strategy for safe analysis of the samples once normal activities resume, bearing in mind that some of the thawed samples may contain the virus.In addition, WADA kindly asks Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) not to send samples to laboratories that have suspended operations until further notice (unless specifically requested to do so by the laboratory itself) and check with other laboratories in advance to make sure they are still accepting samples for analysis.
 
ADOs should refer to the Accredited Laboratories section of WADA’s website where the Agency will publish similar disruptions as the situation evolves.
 
WADA will continue to monitor this exceptional situation closely and make the necessary decisions and recommendations that will prioritize the health of all those involved in the protection of clean sport. Laboratories are encouraged to advise WADA of any amendments they are making to their activities so that WADA can coordinate, assist and advise the anti-doping community as necessary.
 
Thank you for your cooperation and best regards,
 
World Anti-Doping Agency

12/03/20 WADA CALLS ON US SENATE TO CONSIDER WIDELY HELD CONCERNS ABOUT RODCHENKOV ACT

Montreal, 12 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) notes the decision by the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation to approve the Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act of 2019 for referral to and consideration by the US Senate.

WADA will continue to work with US authorities to provide information as needed and to explain some important reservations that a number of other Governments, sports organizations and Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) share about the bill as it is currently drafted. To that end, WADA has repeatedly reached out to the Chair of the Committee to arrange such a meeting but, to date, no response has been received from his office.

WADA supports Governments using their legislative powers to protect clean athletes in the fight against doping and the Rodchenkov Act is no exception. Specifically, WADA considers positive the proposed measures outlined in the bill to assist anti-doping by facilitating the sharing of information between US law enforcement entities and the United States Anti-Doping Agency and by providing protection to whistleblowers.

However, some other very important elements of the bill will, if approved with no changes, have unintended consequences that have the potential to disrupt the globally recognized legal anti-doping framework and to undermine WADA’s capacity to fulfill its mission as the global anti-doping regulator. WADA and many other organizations around the world, including the Council of Europe and the International Olympic Committee, have a concern around the issue of extra-territoriality in the bill.

WADA President Witold Bańka said: “WADA calls on the US Senate to consider widely held and legitimate concerns about the Rodchenkov Act. The bill in its current form could lead to overlapping laws in different jurisdictions that would compromise having a single set of rules for all athletes, all sports and all anti-doping organizations that are subject to the World Anti-Doping Code. This harmonization of rules is at the very core of the global anti-doping program.

“A second unintended consequence is rather than assisting WADA and law enforcement engage whistleblowers as the legislation intends, the bill will actually impede the capacity to use whistleblowers by exposing them to multiple jurisdictions and preventing ‘substantial assistance’ deals. This will thus greatly compromise WADA’s and other ADOs’ investigation capacity. 

“A third unintended consequence could be the emergence of other extra-territorial jurisdictions worldwide and their misuse for purposes other than anti-doping, for example to discriminate against athletes of specific nationalities. This would likely lead to retaliation by stakeholders concerned and set off a chain reaction, which would be detrimental to anti-doping and athletes from all countries, including the US.”

WADA wishes also to understand, if, as claimed by its promoters, the stated aim of the legislation is to protect athletes, why it excludes vast areas of US sport, in particular the professional leagues and all college sport.


09/03/20 WADA ADVISORY REGARDING TESTING WORLDWIDE IN LIGHT OF THE COVID-19 VIRUS

Montreal, 6 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,

In connection with the Covid-19 virus, following the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) 21 February 2020 announcement concerning testing of Chinese athletes; and, WADA’s 28 February announcement that it was cancelling its Annual Symposium in Lausanne, the Agency wishes to share additional important and relevant information with the anti-doping community as it relates to anti-doping activity world-wide in light of Covid-19. 

WADA continues to monitor the situation closely with particular regard to how the virus may impact the conduct of testing activity. To that end, WADA encourages all Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) to follow the advice of local health authorities to ensure proper protection of athletes and doping control personnel alike. WADA urges ADOs to prioritize health and safety while protecting the integrity of robust doping control programs, which are of paramount importance in the lead-up to the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games.

To support this important balance as the situation develops, WADA will monitor testing activity in affected regions closely to detect any possible testing ‘gaps’ which may need to be addressed. If it is determined, for example, that there has been an absence or diminished level of testing on athletes in higher risk areas, this information will be conveyed to the International Olympic Committee, the International Paralympic Committee, as well as any other ADO with a major event in the coming months that would benefit from such information to adjust their testing programs accordingly. This includes the Pre-Olympic Games Task Force being led by the International Testing Agency (ITA).

WADA will continue to monitor this exceptional situation closely and make the necessary decisions and recommendations that will prioritize the health of all those involved in the protection of clean sport. WADA encourages ADOs to advise WADA of any amendments they are making to their testing programs so that WADA can coordinate and assist as necessary.

Thank you for your cooperation and best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


06/03/20 WADA ANNOUNCES THAT THE MEXICO CITY LABORATORY HAS CEASED OPERATIONS

Montreal, 5 March 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that the Laboratorio Nacional de Prevencion y Control del Dopaje-CONADE – the WADA-accredited Laboratory in Mexico City, Mexico (the Laboratory) – has ceased operations; and therefore, is no longer conducting anti-doping analyses as a WADA-accredited Laboratory.

While the Laboratory ceased its operations effective 15 November 2019, this official WADA announcement follows weeks of sustained efforts by the Agency to inform the Mexican Public Authorities of the benefits of maintaining an accredited Laboratory in Mexico.

WADA is satisfied that, in accordance with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), the Laboratory took all necessary measures to notify its clients of its decision to cease operations and assist all relevant Testing Authorities with the transfer of samples, where required, to another WADA-accredited Laboratory. Throughout, WADA monitored the measures taken by the Laboratory in regard to the above ISL requirements in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis and storage of samples, and to preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping Laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in compliance with ISO 17025 Standard assessment and in conjunction with independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


05/03/20 WADA UPDATE REGARDING COURT OF ARBITRATION FOR SPORT PROCEEDINGS TO RESOLVE RUSADA NON-COMPLIANCE DISPUTE

Montreal, 5 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) understands that stakeholders wish to be kept informed as it relates to WADA’s 9 January 2020 request to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to resolve the dispute related to the non-compliance case against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA). On 9 December 2019, WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) unanimously endorsed the recommendation made by the Agency’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) that RUSADA be declared non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) for a period of four years.
 
While WADA appreciates the desire for more information given the potential impact that the CAS proceedings’ outcome will have on sporting events, the matter is in the hands of CAS; and, under Article R43 of the CAS Code rules, the parties, the arbitrators and CAS must not disclose to any third party any facts or other information relating to the dispute or the proceedings without the permission of CAS. Therefore, the Agency simply cannot comment further. However, please rest assured that WADA is committed to an efficient resolution of the proceedings.
 
The request for arbitration in RUSADA’s case was filed in accordance with the process outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS, Article 10.4.1) and it will be resolved by the CAS Ordinary Arbitration Division. In accordance with Article 23.5.9 of the Code, any CAS decision in relation to the non-compliance, the proposed consequences and/or the proposed reinstatement conditions will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Code Signatories.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency

04/03/20 WADA LAUNCHES ONLINE APPLICATION SYSTEM FOR ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATIONS TO APPLY FOR FLEXIBILITY IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TECHNICAL DOCUMENT FOR SPORT SPECIFIC ANALYSIS (TDSSA) MINIMUM LEVELS OF ANALYSIS

Montreal, 4 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that – further to the amendments made to the Technical Document for Sport Specific Analysis (TDSSA) following the stakeholder consultation process conducted in 2019 – it has developed an online application system for Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) to apply for flexibility in the implementation of the Minimum Levels of Analysis (MLAs) for the sports and disciplines contained within the TDSSA. 

An ADO can qualify for flexibility in the implementation of the TDSSA MLAs based on the following two scenarios:

  • The implementation of a haematological module of the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP); and
  • Other non-ABP related criteria e.g. prioritization of target testing, collaboration with other ADOs, use of intelligence in the implementation of an ADO’s anti-doping program, etc*.

The application process is located within the Code Compliance Center (CCC – previously the Code Compliance Questionnaire) platform through which ADOs are required to answer a number of questions against set criteria (listed in Article 6 of the TDSSA) as well as upload supporting documents – including their Risk Assessments, Test Distribution Plans and Registered Testing Pools. On completion of the application, and based on the answers to the questions, ADOs will receive a pre-approved level of flexibility (up to a maximum of 50%) for the implementation of the MLAs for the sports or disciplines they seek flexibility for. This pre-approved flexibility is subject to review by WADA. 

ADOs that are interested in applying for flexibility in the implementation of the MLAs should contact WADA to outline their intentions at tdssa@wada-ama.org. WADA will subsequently open access to the online application by sending an “Invitation Notification” to interested ADOs. For more information, ADOs are encouraged to read the Application for Flexibility User Guide before contacting WADA.

Revised TDSSA Testing Guides

To further support implementation of version 5.0 of the TDSSA, WADA would like to remind ADOs to utilize the updated Testing Guides for Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESAs)Growth Hormone (GH) and Growth Hormone Releasing Factors (GHRFs). ADOs are encouraged to consult these Guides to support their testing strategies when applying analysis for these categories of substances within the scope of the TDSSA.

Should you have any questions relating to the above, please do not hesitate to contact tdssa@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


03/03/20 WADA COMPLIANCE – RAISING THE STANDARD OF ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATIONS’ WORK WORLDWIDE

WADA’s role as the global regulatory body
 
WADA’s primary role as the global regulatory body is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Accordingly, one of the Agency’s main responsibilities is to ensure and monitor effective implementation of the Code and its six* related International Standards (Standards).
 
While it is a challenge for WADA to draft and then agree the Code and Standards with its almost 700 Signatories worldwide – which includes in particular National Anti-Doping Agencies (NADOs), International Federations (IFs) and Major Event Organizations (MEOs) – ensuring that these Signatories comply with the rules is a whole other challenge.
 
WADA’s Compliance Monitoring Program
 
Prior to 2016, WADA wanted to ensure that Signatories implemented the Code and Standards into their rules, regulations, legislation and programs. In 2016, WADA re-focused its efforts on ensuring that Code Signatories not only had compliant rules in place but that they were also implementing compliant anti-doping programs, which WADA could monitor.
 
To do so, WADA initiated development of an ISO-certified Code Compliance Monitoring Program, which aims to reinforce athlete and public confidence in the standard of ADOs’ work worldwide.
 
In terms of Program governance, it includes an external, independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) and an internal Compliance Taskforce (Taskforce). The CRC provides expert advice, recommendations and guidance to WADA’s Executive Committee, Foundation Board and Taskforce on individual cases and compliance activities. It includes an independent Chair, two compliance experts from non-sporting areas, an athlete representative, a government representative and a Sport Movement representative. The Taskforce consists of an internal working group of WADA staff from different departments and offices whose activities are centralized and coordinated. If any non-conformity is identified, the Taskforce facilitates an open dialogue with the Signatory concerned and recommends corrective actions. Support and assistance are provided to help the Signatory address all non-conformities within an agreed timeframe.
 
The Program includes the following four components:
 

  1. The Code Compliance Questionnaire was launched in 2017 as a tool to measure compliance of Signatories against the mandatory requirements of the Code and Standards. WADA reviews all returned questionnaires and develops detailed corrective action plans designed to assist Signatories in enhancing their anti-doping programs. The next questionnaire is planned for 2022.
  2. Audits, which WADA launched in 2016. The Agency conducts in-person and desk (remote) audits of Signatories by trained individuals from WADA and external experts in anti-doping, in which Signatories’ programs are closely reviewed against the requirements set out in the Code and Standards.
  3. Continuous Monitoring Program, which WADA launched in 2016, complements the questionnaire and audits by monitoring a number of key program areas on which WADA has information and data.
  4. WADA continues to review Signatories’ anti-doping rules, regulations and, where applicable (i.e., where a country decides to implement the Code through legislation), legislation to ensure compliance with the Code and International Standards. Individualized assistance and guidance are also provided by WADA in this area.

In addition, WADA uses other sources of information to monitor and assess the quality of anti-doping programs, including ADAMS, investigations and any other intelligence collected or received. WADA continually provides Signatories with assistance and guidance in implementing and complying with the Code and International Standards.

Underpinning the process has been the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS), which came into effect on 1 April 2018, and which clearly sets out the ways WADA supports Signatories in achieving, maintaining and, where applicable, regaining Code compliance. It also provides a necessary and robust legal framework for cases of non-compliance, highlighting a range of graded, predictable and proportionate sanctions for cases of non-compliance by Signatories. Due to the high number of Signatories, the ISCCS includes provision for WADA to best utilize its resources by prioritizing.

Some of the members of WADA’s Compliance Team at the Agency’s Montreal Headquarters.
A Reflection on the Evolution of Anti-Doping

Frédéric Donzé, WADA’s Chief Operating Officer who oversees the Compliance Monitoring Program, says: “This is a very ambitious undertaking. At its core, compliance is about adherence to the global anti-doping rules by Code Signatories – those that are responsible for applying and enforcing them. The ultimate goal of compliance is to level the playing field, that is, to ensure that every Signatory complies with its obligations, and therefore every athlete is subject to the same rules, no matter the sport or geographic location.

“And, if those Signatories or athletes choose to break the rules, everyone is clear on what the consequences would be. It is clear to us that the responsibility needs to be shared. Without Signatories adhering to the agreed-upon rules, how can the athletes be asked to do the same?

“We believe it is a very important step that those who are not meeting the required levels of rules or program implementation are encouraged and supported to meet the requirements and, in the cases where support and help cannot bring them where they should be, that they can be held accountable and can face consequences,” says Donzé.

WADA Director, Standards and Harmonization, Tim Ricketts, says: “Clean sport is evolving. The 2017 Code Compliance Questionnaire identified issues in areas such as developing an intelligence and investigations policy, how ADOs develop doping risk assessment, how they create an effective registered testing pool, how they conduct target testing and deploy sport-specific analysis, and how they retain samples and re-analyze them. A decade ago, if you had asked an anti-doping expert what anti-doping covered, they would have said it was a mix of a few pillars: education, testing and, where doping is found, sanctions.

“Some areas of anti-doping have higher levels of non-compliance than others, particularly around the establishing an effective testing program through a detailed risk assessment followed by the establishment of Test Distribution Plan. From the results of the last questionnaire and the audits conducted to date, we have been able to further tailor our support, including by developing more than 15 templates and checklists to assist Signatories meet their compliance obligations, with several more in the pipeline,” says Ricketts.

Since 2016, WADA has carried out a total of 46 audits of International Federations and National Anti-Doping Organizations, 18 in 2019 alone. The audits and the questionnaire have seen nearly 6,000 corrective actions implemented by Signatories. That is 6,000 individual improvements – some small and technical by nature, others more significant – made to the global anti-doping program that would not otherwise have been achieved.

As WADA increases its compliance monitoring activities it is anticipated that non-conformities by Signatories will reduce as the global anti-doping system continues to improve.
Partnering with Impact

Since 2015, WADA has opened 155 compliance procedures. “In the majority of cases, all non-conformities were addressed by the deadline (usually three months) with only 22 ADOs being declared as non-compliant,” says WADA’s Chief Compliance Manager, Emiliano Simonelli. “This shows how significant WADA’s policy of assistance and guidance has been in strengthening the overall system.”

Deputy Director (Audits and Monitoring Program), Standards and Harmonization, Kevin Haynes, says: “It is important to remember that compliance monitoring does not operate in isolation. It works hand in hand with program development and capacity building, and the daily work that WADA conducts with NADOs, IFs and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations worldwide to grow and improve anti-doping in sports and countries where it may be less developed. It also works in close collaboration with WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department, which is better equipped to identify non-technical non-conformities or corrupt practices.

Code Compliance Monitoring is a key component of WADA’s strategic priorities. 
“We also collaborate with umbrella organizations of Signatories and other monitoring bodies, such as the Council of Europe, to further enhance the global level of ADO compliance. It is a truly enormous task to cover all sports across the whole world, especially given our limited resources, so to be able to rely on the cooperation of others is very important.”

With its vigilant, ongoing and collaborative nature, the Program has enhanced and will strive to continue to raise the standard for anti-doping worldwide.

*Two additional Standards – on education and on results management – will be introduced in January 2021.

‘Spotlight’ previously focused on WADA’s innovative anti-doping education program.


02/03/20 WADA REMINDS STAKEHOLDERS THAT THE REVISED INTERNATIONAL STANDARD FOR TESTING AND INVESTIGATIONS IS NOW IN EFFECT

Montreal, 2 March 2020

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) reminds stakeholders that the revised International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI) entered into force yesterday, 1 March 2020. The revised version, which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) on 4 November 2019 and was first published on 3 December 2019, is an exceptional revision to the ISTI. It is in advance of other approved revisions that will come into force on 1 January 2021 along with the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code and other International Standards that were approved by WADA’s Foundation Board and ExCo in November 2019

The revision to the ISTI that came into force on 1 March 2020 is specifically related to the requirement for urine samples to meet a suitable specific gravity for analysis. Now, the minimum volume of urine required for analysis will remain at 90ml; however, if an athlete can provide 150ml of urine or more, the minimum specific gravity measurement (using a refractometer) will be lowered to 1.003 or above instead of the previous 1.005 or above.

If the athlete provides a sample with a volume greater than 90ml but less than 150ml, the specific gravity measurement of 1.005 (using a refractometer) will remain applicable. 

Athletes who provide a sample with a specific gravity measurement lower than the above measurements will be required to continue to provide additional samples until they reach a suitable specific gravity measurement.

The flowchart below is designed to assist stakeholders with the revised procedure:

This revision, which was endorsed by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group, recognizes significant enhancements in the sensitivity of laboratory analytical methods made over the past 20 years and will reduce the amount of time some athletes spend in doping control stations, making the process more athlete-friendly, while presenting a potential saving in resources for Anti-Doping Organizations.

It is also important to note that this revision to the specific gravity measurement will be applied during the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Should you have any questions regarding the above revision to the ISTI, please feel free to contact Wendy.Butts@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


02/03/20 WADA CANCELS 2020 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM IN LIGHT OF CORONAVIRUS

Montreal, 28 February 2020 – As the current outbreak of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) continues to develop, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) regrets to announce the cancellation of the Agency’s Annual Symposium and related Athlete Session that were to be held at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland on 17-18 and 19 March 2020 respectively. 

WADA took this decision based on the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health’s (FOPH’s) announcement today banning large-scale gatherings of more than 1,000 people in Switzerland until 15 March 2020.

WADA President Witold Banka said: “WADA is disappointed to announce the cancellation of its Annual Symposium, which has become the annual event for anti-doping practitioners. It was a difficult decision as the event attracts almost 1,000 participants from around the world every year; however, it was necessary to ensure the health and safety of the Agency’s staff and stakeholder community. The Agency commits to ensuring that most of the elements of the Symposium program are delivered via alternative means over the coming weeks and months.”

The Symposium, which was to be delivered under the theme “Bringing the 2021 Code and Standards into Action”, was primarily aimed at assisting World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the 2021 Code and International Standards, which will enter into force on 1 January 2021. WADA is confident that, over the coming weeks and months, it will be able to complement its previously announced 2021 Code Implementation Support Program (CISP) to include the elements of the Symposium program via webinars and other channels. The CISP is being developed in coordination with Code Signatories and other partners through 2020.

It should be noted that WADA is reaching out separately to Symposium participants and other stakeholders that are impacted by this cancellation. WADA regrets any inconvenience that this necessary decision may cause to those impacted.

As it relates to the Coronavirus, WADA will continue monitoring thesituation based on expert information from the World Health Organization and will put other measures in place as needed related to staff and stakeholder travel connected to the Agency’s mission.


28/02/20 WADA STATEMENT REGARDING CAS PUBLIC HEARING – WADA V. SUN YANG & FINA

Montreal, 28 February 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) welcomes the ruling of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in relation to WADA’s appeal against the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) disciplinary panel decision in relation to an incident that led to a doping control involving Chinese swimmer Sun Yang not being completed as planned.

WADA had lodged the appeal on the basis that Sun Yang voluntarily refused to submit to sample collection as per the terms of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and the related International Standard for Testing and Investigations. WADA notes the sanction handed down by CAS and is satisfied that justice in this case has been rendered.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA decided to appeal the original FINA ruling having carefully reviewed it and having concluded that there were a number of points that seemed to be incorrect under the Code. Today’s CAS ruling confirms those concerns and is a significant result. We will now need to take time to review the decision in full, and we will continue to review diligently all anti-doping decisions taken by Code Signatories to ensure they are in line with the Code and, when warranted, to exercise our independent right of appeal.”


27/02/20 WADA PUBLISHES INDEPENDENT OBSERVER TEAM REPORT FROM 2019 AFRICAN GAMES

Montreal, 27 February 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published its Independent Observer (IO) Team’s Report regarding the anti-doping program at the 2019 African Games held in Rabat, Morocco, from 19-31 August 2019.

As it has done at a number of major events since 2000, WADA sent a team to monitor the anti-doping program that was run by the Association of National Olympic Committees of Africa (ANOCA) with the aim of reinforcing confidence in athletes and the public as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of the Games’ anti-doping program.

In addition to collaborating with ANOCA and providing general support prior to the Games, the team also provided ANOCA with real-time feedback designed to optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of the program in compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards.

Led by Sophie Berwick, an anti-doping consultant, the four-person team was composed of experts in anti-doping from the African continent who observed and provided feedback on all aspects of doping control. This included the implementation of general anti-doping policies and procedures; test distribution planning; implementation of the out-of-competition and in-competition testing programs; athlete selection and notification for testing; Therapeutic Use Exemptions procedures; sample collection procedures; the transport of samples and their chain of custody; and, the results management process – including hearings that were held during the IO Team’s presence.

Ms. Berwick said: “The 12th African Games were geared towards promoting fair play and working with internal and external stakeholders to protect clean athletes and promote clean sport. The anti-doping program that was implemented during these Games was a massive step forward in terms of quality and execution, and it is our hope that Ghana – who will host the 13th edition of the African Games in 2023 – as well as all African countries hosting Major Events, will support and commit further to the fight against doping in sports, by making use of this report and ensuring that the fight against doping continues to progress in the region.”


24/02/20 FINAL REMINDER TO REGISTER FOR WADA’s
2020 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

Montreal, 24 February 2020

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that this Wednesday, 26 February, is the deadline to register for the 16th edition of the Agency’s Annual Symposium  which will be held at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland on 17-18 March 2020followed by an Athlete Session on 19 March. After this date, all new registrations will be charged a 400 CHF registration fee.

Under the theme “Bringing the 2021 Code and Standards into action”, the 2020 Symposium will open with remarks by WADA President, Witold Bańka, and Director General, Olivier Niggli. Presenters will thereafter aim to support World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the 2021 Code and International Standards (Standards), which will enter into force on 1 January 2021.

Registration for the Symposium

Should you wish to register for the Symposium and/or the Athlete Session on 19 March (which is exclusively dedicated to athletes, athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies), please do so on the Symposium Website by this Wednesday,26 February 2020. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the program, how to register, and how to book your hotel accommodations.

Please note that in an effort to harmonize the registration process across all WADA events, the Agency has recently updated its registration terms and conditions. We strongly recommend that all stakeholders review them before registering.

Delegate App

Once registered, approved participants will receive a notification inviting them to download the delegate app. Via smartphone or tablet, the app will allow participants to access:

  • A personalized agenda with session timings, locations and descriptions
  • Speaker biographies
  • A full list of participants
  • A floor plan and additional event information

Delegates using the app will also be able to add others to their ‘favorites’ and can contact other participants directly to organize meetings in advance of the Symposium.

We encourage participants to make the most of this delegate app in order to maximize communications and networking opportunities in and around the event.

To access the App, simply search for “EW ToGo” on the App Store for iPhones or on Google Play for Android devices.

Note: If you had downloaded the app for previous editions of the Symposium, you will need to delete and re-download the app in order to access the updated version for the 2020 Symposium.

Advisory regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19)

Regarding the coronavirus outbreak in China and elsewhere around the world, please note that WADA is closely monitoring the situation, in particular in light of the upcoming Symposium.

WADA takes the health and safety of its Symposium participants very seriously and therefore, is carefully assessing the travel risk based on expert information from the World Health Organization and the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health

As per the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, none of the samples collected in Switzerland revealed positive for the COVID-19 and therefore, there is no entry restriction to Switzerland. Accordingly, the World Health Organization has also not issued any travel restrictions to Switzerland.

Given this information, at this stage, WADA intends to carry on with the Symposium. The Agency will however continue to monitor the situation and commits to updating stakeholders should its assessment of the situation change. 

In the meantime, for travel advice in connection with the coronavirus, please visit the World Health Organization website.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


21/02/20 WADA UPDATE REGARDING TESTING OF CHINESE ATHLETES IN LIGHT OF CORONAVIRUS

Montreal, 21 February 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that the China Anti-Doping Agency (CHINADA) will resume testing this week following a temporary suspension, initiated on 3 February, of its testing program on mainland China due to the coronavirus, also known as Covid-19.

WADA, the global regulator of anti-doping, has been closely monitoring the situation and has remained in regular contact with CHINADA throughout in order to maintain the integrity of the anti-doping program in China. To that end, CHINADA has advised that it will resume testing missions within China this week, on a phased basis. Priority will be given to testing elite level athletes from higher-risk categories and sports.

The safety of athletes and sample collection personnel involved in the doping control process within China is the key priority. This needs to be balanced with the importance of ensuring that Chinese athletes remain subject to a rigorous testing program for the duration of the coronavirus situation.

CHINADA has implemented a supplementary set of doping control guidelines to be followed during this period. These additional guidelines for CHINADA’s Doping Control Officers are designed as a precaution, to minimize the risk of infection. CHINADA will gradually expand the testing scope based on the progress of China’s epidemic prevention and control while also monitoring the whereabouts of Chinese athletes to maintain the integrity of the doping control system.

While testing on mainland China was temporarily suspended, it should be noted that CHINADA continued to plan and conduct testing on Chinese athletes training and competing outside of China. In January 2020, CHINADA conducted more than 1,200 tests, including 114 urine samples and 80 blood samples from Chinese athletes training abroad. A further 165 urine samples and 113 blood samples are planned to be collected in February across seven countries and nine Olympic sports.

CHINADA will shortly make contact with those Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) that have the right to collect samples from Chinese athletes in China and, under this strict protocol, is willing to accept missions from those organizations, in addition to those organized by CHINADA under its own program. 

To supplement CHINADA’s testing outside China, WADA has written to all International Federations and National Anti-Doping Organizations calling on them to further support this effort in relation to testing Chinese athletes competing or training outside of China, as is their right under the World Anti-Doping Code.

The anti-doping system allows for cooperation between ADOs – including National Anti-Doping Organizations, International Federations, Major Event Organizations etc. – to ensure that the integrity of the program is upheld and that athletes are still being properly tested.


20/02/20 WADA UPDATE REGARDING CHINADA’s TEMPORARY SUSPENSION OF TESTING DUE TO CORONAVIRUS

Montreal, 20 February 2020

Dear Colleagues,
[International Federations (IFs) and National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs)]

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to update you regarding the 3 February announcement of the China Anti-Doping Agency’s (CHINADA’s) temporary suspension of their testing program on mainland China due to the new coronavirus, also known as Covid-19.

WADA has been closely monitoring the situation and is in regular contact with CHINADA to maintain the integrity of the anti-doping program in China. To that end, we are pleased to inform you that CHINADA has advised that it will resume testing missions within China this week, on a phased basis. Priority will be given to testing elite level athletes from higher-risk categories and sports.

The safety of athletes and sample collection personnel involved in the doping control process within China is a key priority. This needs to be balanced with the importance of ensuring that Chinese athletes remain subject to a rigorous testing program for the duration of the coronavirus situation.

While sample collection will resume this week, CHINADA has implemented a supplementary set of doping control guidelines to be followed during this period. These additional guidelines for CHINADA Doping Control Officers (DCOs) are designed as a precaution, to minimize the risk of infection. CHINADA will gradually expand the testing scope based on the progress of China’s epidemic prevention and control while also monitoring the whereabouts of Chinese athletes to maintain the integrity of the doping control system.

The enhanced DCO guidelines include the following:

  • DCOs selected to conduct missions shall be those that have no travel records, no contact with people from affected areas or suspect areas.
  • DCOs are required to monitor their health for 14 days and undertake medical screening from a hospital prior to being appointed to missions.
  • Each sports training centre will prepare a sterile room to be used for doping control.
  • DCOs shall wear a medical protective mask and gloves throughout the whole procedure and change for each athlete tested.
  • Athletes and their representatives are also required to wear medical protective equipment.
  • CHINADA has set up a ‘Doping Control and Epidemic-Prevention Experts Panel’, consisting of anti-doping experts and anti-epidemic specialists in clinical medicine. DCOs have been trained in anti-epidemic procedures and shall report to this panel after each testing mission.

CHINADA will shortly make contact with those Anti-Doping Organizations that have the right to collect samples from Chinese athletes in China and, under this strict protocol, is willing to accept missions from those organizations, in addition to those organized by CHINADA under its own program, at the sports training centers where testing will begin. 

While testing on mainland China was temporarily suspended, it should be noted that CHINADA had continued to plan and conduct testing on Chinese athletes training and competing outside of China. In January 2020, CHINADA conducted more than 1,200 tests, including 114 urine samples and 80 blood samples from Chinese athletes training abroad. A further 165 urine samples and 113 blood samples are planned to be collected in February across seven countries and nine Olympic sports.

For IFs

To supplement CHINADA’s testing outside China, WADA calls on all IFs to further support this effort by considering testing Chinese athletes that are competing in your international events. In addition, we strongly encourage those IFs that have Chinese athletes in your Registered Testing Pools to monitor their whereabouts closely to ensure that if there are opportunities to test those athletes outside of China, such testing opportunities are seriously considered. For testing on athletes located inside China, please contact CHINADA.

For NADOs

To supplement CHINADA’s testing outside of China, WADA calls on all NADOs to further support this effort by offering your assistance to conduct testing on Chinese athletes that may be training in your country. This can be done by contacting CHINADA or through your own initiative. As a reminder, under the World Anti-Doping Code, your NADO is permitted to test foreign athletes that are training in your country. 

WADA thanks you for your collaborative effort and support during this difficult situation and commits to updating you as the situation progresses further.

Should you have any queries on this matter, please do not hesitate to contact testing@wada-ama.org.

Sincerely,

World Anti-Doping Agency


13/02/20 WADA PUBLISHES LIST OF CONFIRMED PRESENTERS FOR ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

Montreal, 13 February 2020

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish a list of confirmed presenters for the Agency’s 16th Annual Symposium – taking place at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland on 17-18 March 2020.

Under the theme “Bringing the 2021 Code and Standards into action”, the 2020 Symposium will open with remarks by WADA’s President, Witold Bańka, and Director General, Olivier Niggli. Thereafter, the presenters will mainly address practical implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards), which will enter into force on 1 January 2021.

Confirmed Presenters

The list of confirmed presenters includes representatives from Anti-Doping Organizations and experts from the global anti-doping community – including legal professionals, scientists and researchers, and features the following individuals, among many others:Yang Yang – Vice-President, WADAUlrich Haas – Professor of Procedural and Private Law, University of ZurichBen Sandford – Chair, WADA Athlete CommitteeRichard Young – Attorney and main drafter of the 2021 CodeAudrey Kinahan – Chair, WADA Prohibited List Expert GroupTerence Wan – Chair, WADA Laboratory Expert GroupAndrea Petroczi – Chair, WADA Prevalence Working Group For the full list of presenters, along with their biographies and scheduled presentations, please consult the Presenters section of the Symposium website. 

Registration for the Symposium

Should you wish to register for the Symposium and/or the Athlete Session on 19 March (which is exclusively dedicated to athletes, athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies), please do so on the Symposium Website by 26 February 2020. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the program, how to register, and how to book your hotel accommodations.

Please note that in an effort to harmonize the registration process across all WADA events, the Agency has recently updated its registration terms and conditions. We strongly recommend that all stakeholders review them before registering.

Optional tourist activities

Should you wish to register for one of the Symposium’s optional tourist activities – a Guided City Tour of Lausanne or a Walk through the Lavaux vineyards & wine tasting – we invite you to do so as soon as possible in the “My Program” section of the Symposium website.

WADA looks forward to welcoming you in Lausanne as the Agency partners with all its stakeholders to bring the 2021 Code and Standards into action.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


12/02/20 WADA AND THE UNIVERSITÉ DE SHERBROOKE LAUNCH A RESEARCH CHAIR ON ANTI-DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 11 February 2020 – Today, at an event in Montreal, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the ‘Université de Sherbrooke’ (University) officially launched the University’s Research Chair on Anti-Doping in Sport (Chair). 
 
The Chair and related graduate program in the field of humanities—which were developed in partnership by the two organizations, but which will be independently led by the University—aim to develop globally-recognized expertise in the field of anti-doping through an approach focused on advancing research and knowledge transfer.
 
In May 2019, WADA announced that its Foundation Board approved creation of the Chair; and that, as part of this partnership, the Agency committed to an investment of USD 200,000 per year for five years that the University would match. In order to ensure the long-term sustainability of the Chair, the University will work to raise additional funds from the public and private sectors.

From right to left, WADA Director General Olivier Niggli with representatives from the University of Sherbrooke: Jean-Pierre Perreault, David Pavot, Vincent Joli-Coeur, and François Coderre.

WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “Research and Education have long been strategic priorities for WADA. We believe that this partnership with the Université de Sherbrooke’s Research Chair on Anti-Doping in Sport will provide a big boost towards WADA’s mission to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport. Over the years, WADA has invested millions in social science research that specifically measures the effectiveness of existing anti-doping strategies and interventions; and, informs more effective doping prevention strategies. In parallel, WADA is increasing access to education and information programs worldwide with the goal of preventing intentional or unintentional use of prohibited substances and methods.

“WADA is very proud of this partnership that strengthens the Agency’s presence in our host community since 2002; and, reiterates our commitment to Quebec’s research and academic communities. The Université de Sherbrooke is renowned in Canada and internationally for its capacity to create applied research programs and chairs with a variety of partners. We are confident that it is well positioned to bring unique expertise and a perspective to the anti-doping community that is supported by research; and, in so doing, contribute to making Montreal a global center of excellence for anti-doping.ˮ

The Chair will provide applied research to the anti-doping community. It will bring an interdisciplinary focus in anti-doping; particularly, in the field of humanities—most notably in management, law, education and sociology. In addition to the Chair, the graduate program—via a master’s degree on anti-doping in sports—will attract students and train anti-doping professionals from around the world, increasing the capacity of the anti-doping system. The launch date of these programs will be communicated by the University in due course.

Professor David Pavot, holder of the Research Chair on Anti-Doping in Sport, said: “WADA’s environment is made up of international organizations as well as national anti-doping agencies and sports federations. The fight against doping has an impressive number of levels. This association with WADA opens the door to a universe of remarkable depth.”

Stéphane Paquet, CEO of Montréal International, said: “We are truly proud to have helped the World Anti-Doping Agency in creating this new research chair with the Université de Sherbrooke. The presence of a flagship organization like WADA helps to strengthen the leadership of Greater Montréal in the fight against doping, in addition to increasing the international prestige of our region.”

About WADA

Formed in 1999, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the Sports Movement and Governments of the world. As the global regulatory body, WADA’s primary role is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Its key activities include: ensuring and monitoring effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code and its related International Standards; scientific and social science research; education; intelligence and investigations; and, building anti-doping capacity with anti-doping organizations worldwide. WADA is headquartered in Montreal, Canada and has offices in Cape Town, Lausanne, Montevideo, Tokyo and Warsaw.

About the Université de Sherbrooke

The Université de Sherbrooke (UdeS) is one of Quebec’s three major research hubs. Recognized for its innovation, UdeS is a leading partner of upper-level and regional governments to promote social, cultural and economic development. It also stands out through strong growth in its research activities in recent years, its success in technology transfer, as well as its initiatives in entrepreneurship and open innovation in collaboration with industry and the social sector.


5/02/20 QUESTION AND ANSWER DOCUMENT ON
RUSADA NON-COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 5 February 2020

Dear Colleagues,

Since the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Executive Committee decision of 9 December 2019 regarding RUSADA compliance and the conference call that WADA held for International Federations and Major Event Organizations on 13 December 2019, some representatives have asked for a Question & Answer document to complement the information that was made available at the time. This message is simply to draw your attention to the Q&A document that is available on WADA’s website.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


3/02/20 WADA ASKS FOR RUSADA DISPUTE HEARING TO BE HELD IN PUBLIC

Montreal, 3 February 2020 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) submitted a formal request to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) that the hearing to resolve the dispute related to the non-compliance case against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) be held in public.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA’s investigations on Russia, and this latest case of non-compliance, have generated huge interest around the world. It is WADA’s view – and that of many of our stakeholders – that this dispute at CAS should be held in a public forum to ensure that everybody understands the process and hears the arguments.”

Background:

When RUSADA was reinstated as compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) in September 2018, there were conditions attached. One of these was that the Russian authorities had to grant WADA Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) access to the authentic Laboratory Information Management System data and underlying raw analytical data contained within the Moscow Laboratory.

In January 2019, WADA I&I retrieved 24 terabytes of data from the Laboratory and then embarked on a painstaking forensic examination to determine whether they were authentic and complete. During this process, both WADA I&I and independent forensic investigators confirmed manipulation and deletion of some of the data had been carried out after RUSADA’s reinstatement.

In September 2019, WADA’s independent Compliance Review Committee opened a non-compliance case against RUSADA and, following an in-depth review, recommended to WADA’s ExCo that under the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories that came into force on 1 April 2018, RUSADA be declared non-compliant for a period of four years and that various consequences be imposed. These consequences included that Russia would not be allowed to participate in, host or bid for various covered events, including the Olympics, Paralympics and Code Signatories’ World Championships, for the same four-year period. On 9 December 2019, the ExCo unanimously agreed to uphold the CRC recommendation.

Within the 21-day deadline, RUSADA indicated it was disputing the decision and so, on 9 January 2020, WADA filed a formal request for arbitration with CAS in Lausanne, Switzerland, to resolve the dispute. The matter is now in the hands of CAS. In accordance with Article 23.5.9 of the Code, any CAS decision in relation to the non-compliance, the proposed consequences and/or the proposed reinstatement conditions will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Code Signatories.

A detailed ‘Chronology of the Russian Doping Crisis’ and a set of frequently asked questions are attached as complementary information relating to the Russian doping crisis.


30/01/20 REMINDER: REGISTER FOR WADA’S 2020 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

FULLY DEDICATED SESSION FOR ATHLETES ON
19 MARCH 2020

Montreal, 30 January 2020
 

Dear Colleagues,

As first communicated on 29 November 2019, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that online registration is currently open for the 16th edition of the Agency’s Annual Symposium. The Symposium, which will be held at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland on 17-18 March 2020 will, due to the success of last year’s format, follow with an entirely dedicated Athlete Session on 19 March.

The WADA Symposium, which is the main event on the global anti-doping calendar, gathers anti-doping practitioners from around the world and provides them with the opportunity to interact and learn from one another. This year’s Symposium will once again welcome athletes, representatives from Anti-Doping Organizations, Governments, WADA-accredited Laboratories and Athlete Passport Management Units; as well as, other stakeholders such as the media, researchers and service providers — all that are integral to clean sport.

Under the theme “Bringing the 2021 Code and Standards into action”, the 2020 Symposium will open with remarks by WADA’s new President, Witold Bańka, and Director General, Olivier Niggli; and, thereafter, aim to assist World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the 2021 Code and International Standards (Standards), which will enter into force on 1 January 2021. This will include sessions that:

  • Provide an overview of the most impactful changes to the Code;
  • Outline what is expected of ADOs in preparation for the 2021 Code and Standards coming into force;
  • Focus on specific International Standards;
  • Feature athletes talking about the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act;
  • Outline how Governments can further contribute to anti-doping;
  • Look at key topics, such as social science research, doping prevalence, detection methods and ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS; and
  • To cap off day one, a session that gives participants the opportunity to interact directly with Messrs. Bańka and Niggli; as well as, WADA’s new Vice President, Ms. Yang Yang.

Athlete Session

As it relates to the dedicated Athlete Session on 19 March, under the leadership of WADA’s Athlete Committee, the Agency will once again welcome participation of athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies. Anti-Doping Organizations are kindly asked to encourage the participation of athlete representatives, who are invited to participate in the Symposium and in the Athlete Session free of charge, in order to maximize athlete attendance and voices. With former elite athletes Witold Bańka and Yang Yang having assumed their roles as WADA President and Vice-President on 1 January 2020, a strong focus will be put on athletes’ engagement in the protection of Clean Sport during these three days.

Registration and accommodation bookings

Should you wish to register for the Symposium and/or the Athlete Session (which is exclusively dedicated to athletes, athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies), please do so on the Symposium Website by 26 February 2020. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the preliminary program, how to register and how to book your hotel accommodations.

The deadline for hotel bookings through the Symposium Website is 31 January 2020.

Please note that in an effort to harmonize the registration process across all WADA events, the Agency has recently updated its registration terms and conditions. We strongly recommend that all stakeholders review them before registering.

WADA looks forward to welcoming you in Lausanne as the Agency partners with all stakeholders to bring the 2021 Code and Standards into action.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


24/01/20 WADA LAUNCHES E-LEARNING COURSE FOR MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS

Montreal, 24 January 2020 – In another effort for the protection of clean sport, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to launch the ADeL for Medical Professionals course on its Anti-Doping e-Learning Platform (ADeL) today to coincide with UNESCO’s International Day of Education.

This new online course is aimed at medical professionals, which includes sports physicians or any other professional involved in the diagnosis, treatment or rehabilitation of athletes; such as, physiotherapists, general practitioners, sports nutritionists and pharmacists. Recognizing the important role they all play in protecting clean sport, the course outlines how medical professionals can operate effectively in line with the anti-doping rules; how they can support athletes in meeting their responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code (Code); and, therefore, how they can help prevent doping.
 

WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “WADA is very pleased to launch ADeL for Medical Professionals on UNESCO’S International Day of Education. Among other things, this course reaffirms education as a fundamental activity in the protection of Clean Sport. Clean Sport education plays a key role in protecting athletes, and increasing access to relevant, research-based education for all our stakeholders is one of our key priorities.”

WADA Director, Education, Amanda Hudson, added: “We are confident that this course will benefit medical professionals working with athletes, helping them understand anti-doping and how their medical practice, decision-making and advice must always support a Clean Sport ethos. Medical professionals that are educated regarding anti-doping can benefit athletes by providing them with accurate anti-doping advice and positively influencing their values and behaviors. These are core responsibilities under the Code. WADA encourages Anti-Doping Organizations to promote ADeL for Medical Professionals within their respective communities and to support their need to be educated.”

WADA has also developed a special course titled ADeL for Medical Professionals at Major Games in collaboration with the International Olympic Committee (IOC)This course, which can also be accessed on the ADeL platform, focuses on the specific knowledge required of medical professionals, such as team doctors that are attending a major sporting event, and includes guidance on managing and bringing medication to the Olympic Games as well as information on the IOC’s No-Needle Policy. Completion of the ADeL for Medical Professionals at Major Games course is a pre-requisite for team doctors registering for the upcoming Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

To complete both courses, simply register on ADeL or log in to your existing account and scroll to the Library section. The courses are mobile-friendly and can be easily accessed through smart phones or tablets. In addition, WADA has created an ADeL User Guide in order to help users navigate through the platform.

While the course is initially being launched in English, WADA will work with stakeholders around the world to translate ADeL for Medical Professionals into further languages.

For any questions or to provide feedback on these two ADeLresources, or any other ADeL resource, please direct your emails to adel@wada-ama.org.


23/01/20 WADA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE APPOINTS NEW STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIRS, RECEIVES UPDATE REGARDING RUSADA COMPLIANCE CASE

Montreal, 23 January 2020 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Executive Committee (ExCo) held an extraordinary meeting that was graciously hosted by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the Olympic House in Lausanne, Switzerland. Welcomed by IOC President Thomas Bach, the 12 members of the ExCo discussed in particular the appointment of five new WADA Standing Committee Chairs, as well as a number of other topics including the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) compliance case, the provisional suspension of the Moscow Laboratory, and consideration of WADA’s new Strategic Plan for 2020-24.
 
In his first ExCo meeting as WADA President, Witold Bańka said: “It is very encouraging to see the high level of commitment expressed by the ExCo members around the table today. The Agency is at an important stage, beginning a new era. As we continue to implement major governance reforms and to develop a forward-looking Strategic Plan, I am confident we will face our challenges effectively for the promotion of the values of clean sport and the protection of athletes around the world.”
 
Appointments of Standing Committee Chairs
 
With the terms of the Chairs of WADA’s five Standing Committees having come to an end on 31 December 2019 (except for the Compliance Review Committee, whose Chair remained in place until this ExCo meeting to ensure continuity of the CRC activities), the ExCo approved the following new Chair appointments with immediate effect:

  1. Athlete Committee: Ben Sandford, New Zealand
  2. Education Committee: Kady Kanouté Tounkara, Mali
  3. Health, Medical and Research Committee: Lars Engebretsen, Norway
  4. Finance and Administration Committee: Ser Miang Ng, Singapore
  5. Compliance Review Committee (CRC): The Hon. James Wood, Australia

[Biographical information regarding the new Chairs can be found here.]
 
Mr. Bańka said: “WADA welcomes the new Standing Committee Chairs to these important advisory roles within WADA. It is clear that the Agency is acquiring a depth of experience and knowledge in their areas of expertise, including from two former elite athletes, which we and Clean Sport will benefit from significantly. We are grateful for their commitment and look forward to working with them in their new roles.”
 
The Standing Committees, which report into the ExCo, act as advisory committees to WADA, providing guidance for the Agency’s programs. Before being appointed by the ExCo, all candidates to the positions of Chairs of these committees were subject to a robust and independent process of review and assessment by WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee. The Nominations Committee stemmed from the Agency’s governance reforms endorsed by the Board in November 2018.
 
As it relates to the vacant seats on the Standing Committees, the Committee Chairs will now consider the applications for vacant seats in their respective Committees with WADA’s President and Director General and propose members for consideration and endorsement by the ExCo via circular vote in February/March 2020.
 
Concerning other governance matters, the Nominations Committee provided recommendations to the ExCo with respect to the profiles expected for the two independent members that will join the ExCo later this year, with the objective of complementing the existing characteristics and skills of the current members. Candidates for these two seats will be nominated respectively by Governments and the Sport Movement, vetted by the Nominations Committee, and ultimately appointed by the Board at its meeting in May.
 
RUSADA Compliance
 
The ExCo members received an update on the compliance case against RUSADA from the outgoing Chair of the CRC, Jonathan Taylor. As communicated on 9 January, WADA filed a formal request for arbitration with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to resolve the dispute. From then, third parties had 10 days to apply to intervene in the matter, under the terms of Article 23.5.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code. The process is now in the hands of CAS and once a panel is nominated and issues timelines, WADA will file a full brief without delay, in accordance with the rules.
 
The ExCo was also updated on the Chair’s decision, announced on 22 January, to provisionally suspend the WADA-approved status of the Moscow Laboratory, pending formal disciplinary action. This provisional suspension prohibits the Moscow Laboratory from carrying out any work related to the analysis of blood samples in connection with the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) program.
 
WADA’s 2020-24 Strategic Plan
 
In addition, the ExCo was updated on the development of a new WADA Strategic Plan for 2020-24 and provided feedback to WADA Management with the objective of submitting this plan for approval by the Board at its meeting in May. The plan will form the basis of WADA’s strategic activities over the next five years as it continues to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport


22/01/20 WADA PROVISIONALLY SUSPENDS APPROVED STATUS OF MOSCOW LABORATORY

Montreal, 22 January 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that it has provisionally suspended the WADA-approved status of the National Anti-Doping Laboratory of Moscow (Moscow Laboratory), Russia, with immediate effect, pending formal disciplinary action.

This provisional suspension prohibits the Moscow Laboratory from carrying out any work related to the analysis of blood samples in connection with the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) program and will remain in place pending disciplinary proceedings to be carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee.

On 21 January 2020, the WADA Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) made a recommendation to the Chair of the Executive Committee (ExCo), Witold Bańka, to impose a provisional suspension in application of the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), and Mr. Bańka agreed to do so with immediate effect. Under the terms of the ISL, a Disciplinary Committee will be mandated to make a recommendation to Mr. Bańka regarding the status of the laboratory’s ABP approval.

This step was taken in light of the ExCo decision of 9 December 2019 that the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) again be declared non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code due to the discovery by WADA of manipulation of some of the data extracted from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019, in breach of the conditions of RUSADA’s reinstatement in September 2018. The LabEG considered the intentional alteration and deletion of laboratory data prior to and during the time it was being forensically copied by WADA as a serious violation of the Code of Ethics of the ISL.

During the period of suspension, all ABP samples collected prior to the date of the provisional suspension may be analyzed by the Moscow Laboratory and the laboratory will need to contact all relevant Testing Authorities to determine whether any stored ABP samples need to be transported to a WADA-accredited or ABP-approved laboratory for further analysis.

WADA revoked the Moscow Laboratory’s full accreditation in 2015 following the exposure of Russia’s institutionalized doping program. In order to ensure the continuity of the haematological module of the ABP in Russia and, bearing in mind it is practically impossible for laboratories to interfere with the blood variables of samples due to the nature of the analytical equipment and the ABP principles in place, the Moscow Laboratory was approved for ABP analysis only, in May 2016. The laboratory’s accreditation for all other anti-doping activities remained revoked, as per the process.

According to the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories or approving them for ABP analysis only, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


22/01/20 WADA LAUNCHES ITS NEW ‘TESTING CENTER’ – A ‘NEXT GEN’ ADAMS MODULE THAT WILL HELP STRENGTHEN TESTING PROGRAMS WORLDWIDE

Montreal, 22 January 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that, effective today, WADA’s new ‘Testing Center’ is available for use by Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) via WADA’s ‘Next Gen’ Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS).  

Testing Center provides an improved means for ADOs to control, plan (forecast) and manage their testing programs. It replaces ADAMS ‘Classic’ Test Distribution Planning tool, which has been operational for years and required modernizing.  

Test Distribution Planning is a key component of the International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI).  Under the ISTI, ‘WADA, in consultation with International Federations and other ADOs, will adopt a Technical Document (the Technical Document for Sport Specific Analysis – TDSSA) that establishes by means of a risk assessment which Prohibited Substances and/or Prohibited Methods are most likely to be abused in particular sports and sport disciplines. Starting with a risk assessment, each ADO with Testing authority shall develop and implement an effective, intelligent and proportionate test distribution plan that prioritizes appropriately between disciplines, categories of Athletes, types of Testing, types of Samples collected, and types of Sample analysis.’

WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “WADA is confident that its new Testing Center will help strengthen doping control programs worldwide. This new module is part of WADA’s ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS project, which is one of WADA’s strategic priorities that involves a complete rebuild of ADAMS to ensure that it is optimized technically and securely to support athletes and the global anti-doping program. ‘Next Gen’ prioritizes mobility of ADAMS use, enhanced connectivity, reliability, performance and general usability.”

WADA Deputy Chief Operating Officer, Stuart Kemp, said: “The new Testing Center is a powerful new tool that demonstrates that ADAMS ‘Next Gen’ will deliver tangible benefits to ADOs world-wide. It improves the integrity and accuracy of data reported from ADAMS, reduces human error, provides faster and increasingly standardized processes; and, reduces the resources required to administer day-today anti-doping activities. We hope Testing Center brings efficiencies to the anti-doping community through a new dashboard, real-time data and reporting; and, we look forward to receiving user feedback. Comments will help us drive further improvements over time.”

Testing Center follows on the heels of WADA’s ‘Athlete Central’ Whereabouts App, which was launched in November 2019 and has received positive feedback from athletes. In keeping with ‘Next Gen’s’ project plan, the Agency will be launching more modules, upgrades and enhancements during the course of 2020.

For more information regarding the Testing Center, please visit WADA’s website.


10/01/20 NEW YEAR MESSAGE TO STAKEHOLDERS FROM WADA PRESIDENT WITOLD BANKA

Montreal, 10 January 2020

Dear supporters of clean sport,

On behalf of all of us at the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), please accept my very best wishes for the year ahead. It promises to be one that is filled with plenty of exciting sports action. We are conscious that athletes will be starting the new year with great dreams and expectations for the months ahead. They may rest assured that WADA is more determined than ever to protect athletes and to promote clean sport in all that we do.

Now entering its 21st year, we may say that WADA has truly come of age. Only days into my presidency of the Agency, it is very clear to me that WADA, as the global leader of anti-doping, has significantly matured and is stronger than ever before. The athletes of the world, their fans and every parent encouraging a child to follow their sporting dream deserve nothing less. To this, I add my personal commitment to see that WADA goes from strength to strength in the coming years. Where there is room to improve, we will do so with vision and hard work. This is the way of the successful athlete and it will be WADA’s way also.

WADA’s determination

It is certain that WADA will face challenges this year as in others. It is also certain that in the face of those challenges, our determination to stay the course remains extremely solid. You may have seen that we filed our formal notice of dispute yesterday with the Court of Arbitration for Sport in our non-compliance case against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency. As the monitoring body of anti-doping worldwide, WADA will not hesitate to do whatever is necessary to protect clean sport. This is in the spirit of the Katowice Declaration that concluded WADA’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, which was held in my home country of Poland last November.

We declared that we would work to bring all perpetrators to account without limitation. Where systems and cultures allow – and even enable – the use of prohibited substances and methods, we must work to make sure that athletes are not the only ones sanctioned. The cultures and systems must change too and those responsible brought to justice. This has been WADA’s approach to the Russian doping crisis, as shown by the strong consequences endorsed by our Executive Committee in December, consequences that target the guilty parties and protect the innocent.

WADA’s purpose and progress

The path that has already been set for WADA is one of purpose and progress. I am deeply grateful to my predecessor Sir Craig Reedie for his 20-year commitment to WADA and the protection of clean sport. The Agency has arrived at this point due to well-defined priorities. Of course, I do believe the system can still do more but doing so will require more than just the professionalism and dedication already shown by WADA’s expert volunteers and highly dedicated staff. It will require greater resources.

In this regard, WADA is grateful to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for its recent commitment to provide up to USD 10 million for a range of activities, including the long-term storage of samples, the enhancement of WADA’s program of scientific research, and the strengthening of WADA’s world-leading Intelligence and Investigations Department. It is thanks to both the IOC and Governments of the world that we are able to operate as we do; and, we appreciate the approved 8% year-on-year increases to WADA’s 2018-2022 budget very much.

Having said this, I continue to believe that the funding made available to support clean sport, including at the national level, should be increased. That is why I have proposed the creation of an anti-doping solidarity fund. I believe there are many socially responsible, private organizations (sport, pharmaceutical, etc.) that would have an interest in enhancing their image by investing in the integrity of sport. From a marketing point of view, this is a clear opportunity for a brand to associate itself with the protection of clean sport. Anti-doping also helps sports broadcasters maintain the quality of the product they buy and sell. Nobody wants to watch events that are tainted. Given that broadcasters benefit from the global anti-doping system, I believe that they too could have an interest in contributing to it.

I know this will be a time-consuming, long-term project but I am ready to initiate it this year. I am prepared to dedicate my time to make a difference. The aim of the fund should be to create and support – financially or otherwise – anti-doping structures, such as National Anti-Doping Organizations, laboratories or other partners within the anti-doping community. It should fund such things as equipment, staffing, testing programs and educational campaigns.

WADA’s increased support for Signatories

It is to WADA’s credit that 2020 will already see a greater level of support for Signatories to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) than ever before. A year from now, the revised 2021 Code and related International Standards, to which so many of you have helpfully contributed, will come into force. Together, we will raise our game to new levels of performance for the good of clean sport.

In making improvements, WADA knows it must be exemplary. This month, the Executive Committee will continue the implementation of wide-ranging governance reforms. And we will take these reforms further as part of a new Strategic Plan for 2020-24. In that time, stakeholders will notice greater independence, as well as an athlete appointed to each Standing Committee, ensuring the crucial voices of athletes are at the core of all our activities. Athletes’ interests must be put first.

In closing, I would simply say that I am acutely aware that the Agency’s performance is very important to the future of athletes and to the future of sport. I can assure you that I plan to work very hard — alongside WADA’s new Vice President and fellow former elite athlete Yang Yang; WADA’s Director General, Olivier Niggli, and the Management Team; the Executive Committee; the Foundation Board and all key stakeholders — to ensure that we continue to lead a global anti-doping program that supports the values of clean sport at all times. I look forward to meeting with stakeholders and I commit for WADA on the whole, and myself as its President, to communicate with you in a timely, transparent and meaningful way. It is my hope that this communication goes both ways. Your views count every bit as much as your contribution to clean sport; without which, we simply could not succeed in our mission.

Thank you and best regards,

Witold Banka
WADA President


09/01/20 WADA FILES OFFICIAL REQUEST WITH COURT OF ARBITRATION FOR SPORT TO RESOLVE RUSADA DISPUTE

Montreal, 9 January 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that, today, it filed a formal request for arbitration with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland, to resolve the dispute related to the non-compliance case against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

This request for arbitration was filed in accordance with the process outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS, Article 10.4.1) and it will be resolved by the CAS Ordinary Arbitration Division. Under Article 23.5.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), third parties may apply to intervene within 10 days of the date of this press release.

The issue relates to the discovery by WADA of the manipulation of Moscow Laboratory data that were retrieved by WADA as part of post-reinstatement conditions imposed by WADA in September 2018 when RUSADA was reinstated as compliant. The WADA Executive Committee (ExCo) unanimously decided on 9 December 2019 to endorse a recommendation of the independent Compliance Review Committee to declare RUSADA as non-compliant for four years and impose a range of strong consequences, which include Russia’s exclusion from participating in, bidding for or hosting major sporting events held in that time, including the Olympic and Paralympic Games and World Championships organized or sanctioned by Code Signatories. As part of these consequences, athletes from Russia may only participate in the covered events where they are able to demonstrate that they are not implicated by the situation in Russia.

On 27 December 2019, RUSADA formally disputed the ExCo decision. As per the special provisions applicable to the Ordinary Arbitration Procedure contained within section R38 of the CAS Code of Sports-Related Arbitration, WADA has filed for arbitration as the claimant. Within that application, WADA has included the name of the respondent (RUSADA) and a brief statement of the facts of the case. WADA is represented in these proceedings by Ross Wenzel and Nicolas Zbinden of Swiss law firm Kellerhals Carrard, both of whom have extensive experience in successfully litigating doping cases, including against Russian athletes. Once the panel is nominated and the panel issues timelines, WADA will file a full brief with CAS.

In accordance with Article 23.5.9 of the Code, any CAS decision in relation to the non-compliance, the proposed consequences and/or the proposed reinstatement conditions will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Code Signatories.


09/01/20 WADA ATHLETE OUTREACH PROGRAM IN ACTION AT LAUSANNE 2020 YOUTH OLYMPIC GAMES

Montreal, 9 January 2020 – As part of its ongoing commitment to supporting young athletes around the world and protecting clean sport, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is deploying its Athlete Outreach (AO) program at the Lausanne 2020 Winter Youth Olympic Games (YOG), which are running from 9-22 January 2020 and will involve approximately 1,880 athletes (15-18 years old) from 79 countries.

Members of WADA’s Athlete Outreach Team with Swiss Confederation President Simonetta Sommaruga.

WADA’s AO team, which is staffed with anti-doping experts from WADA, the International Testing Agency (ITA) and various International Federations, is already on the ground and will be active throughout the YOG in the athletes’ villages both in Lausanne and St. Moritz as part of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC’s) ‘Learn and Share Program’. The aim of the team is to build awareness among young athletes, their support personnel and others as to the reasons for competing clean and the dangers and consequences of doping; in addition to, athletes’ rights and responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA is thrilled to have an outreach team in action at the Youth Olympic Games, as has been the case since the creation of this event in 2010. The young athletes participating in these Games are the very best in their field and many will be part of the next generation of Olympians. It is vital that we reach these athletes as early as possible to reinforce clean sport values in them and help them to understand the importance of ‘Playing True’ if we want them to contribute to building a level playing field for the years to come.”

Visitors to the AO booth are encouraged to complete the Play True Quiz, which is now available in 43 languages, to sign a pledge explaining why they ‘Play True’, and to share their experience on social media using the hashtag #PlayTrue. Athletes who take part in WADA’s Outreach activities will be rewarded with a winter neck buff that highlights a unique design prepared exclusively for the 2020 YOG.


06/01/20 WADA STATEMENT ON GERMAN DOCUMENTARY CONCERNING THE INTERNATIONAL WEIGHTLIFTING FEDERATION

Montreal, 6 January 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) notes the 5 January documentary by German broadcaster ARD, which makes a number of allegations concerning the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF). WADA can confirm that its independent Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) Department is aware of the allegations and will continue to pursue its enquiries regarding potential breaches of the World Anti-Doping Code. However, as these enquiries are ongoing, WADA has no further comment to make in this regard at this time.

As it relates to the documentary’s specific allegations regarding doping of weightlifters in Thailand, which are new and of great concern to WADA, the Agency will follow up with the IWF, the Doping Control Agency of Thailand and other stakeholders to gain a clearer picture of the situation. WADA will take any action that may be warranted if breaches of the Code by individuals or Anti-Doping Organizations are established.


01/01/20 WADA 2020 LIST OF PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES AND METHODS NOW IN FORCE

Montreal, 1 January 2020 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that its 2020 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List), which was first published on 30 September 2019, enters into force today (1 January). 

The List, which is one of six International Standards that are mandatory for all Signatories of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), designates what substances and methods are prohibited both in- and out-of-competition, and which substances are banned in particular sports.

The List’s annual revision process is led by WADA, beginning with an initial meeting in January and concluding with the publication of the List by 1 October. This is an extensive consultation process that includes WADA’s List Expert Group gathering information, circulating a draft List among stakeholders, taking their submissions into consideration and revising the draft, followed by review by the Agency’s Health, Medical and Research (HMR) Committee.

The HMR Committee then makes its recommendation to the WADA Executive Committee, which approves the List during its September meeting.

For a substance or method to be added to the List, it must be determined that it meets two of the following three criteria:

  1. It has the potential to enhance or enhances sport performance
  2. It represents an actual or potential health risk to the athletes
  3. It violates the spirit of sport

It should be noted that for athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method that is on the List, they may be accommodated if they meet the criteria outlined in the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE). The TUE process has overwhelming acceptance from athletes, physicians and anti-doping stakeholders worldwide.

To view the changes made in the 2020 Prohibited List as compared to the 2019 version, please see the 2020 Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes.

Languages and Formats

The 2020 Prohibited List; the 2020 Summary of Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2020 Monitoring Program are available for download on WADA’s website in multiple languages.

Stakeholders wishing to translate the List into other languages are kindly asked to signal their interest to info@wada-ama.org. If interested, WADA would provide the necessary files and, once the translation is finalized, would make the List available on the Agency’s website.

The List’s mobile-friendly digital edition can be accessed here.


30/12/19 END OF TERM MESSAGE TO STAKEHOLDERS FROM WADA PRESIDENT, SIR CRAIG REEDIE

Montreal, 30 December 2019

Dear members of the Clean Sport community,

As the end of 2019 nears, so does the great honor of having served WADA as President over the past six years. Since 2014, WADA’s work has been challenging and rewarding in equal measure. We have faced egregious and, at times, unimaginable threats to clean sport. In dealing with those threats, however, we have done more than simply weather the storm. WADA is clearly stronger now than at any time in its history.

A little more than 20 years ago, WADA was founded to promote, harmonize and regulate the fight against doping in sport. To look back now on just how far the organization has come, and to have been a part of its governance structure throughout, is quite humbling. The changes have been nothing short of remarkable.

Development of world-class Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) capability

Considering the last six years in particular, I am especially pleased to see how WADA responded to the challenges it faced since 2014, in particular the Russian doping crisis that led to the development and implementation of a world-class Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) team, which now boasts 11 members and could easily be considered the best such team in sport.

The work of individuals within that department, among others, has been instrumental in WADA’s response to the Russian doping crisis, the most recent chapter of which culminated in December with the Executive Committee decision to recommend non-compliance for the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) along with a range of strong consequences. Ultimately, it will be for the Court of Arbitration for Sport to rule on it but throughout this process, WADA has shown it has the will, the expertise and the legal tools to stand up effectively to this unprecedented level of cheating and corruption.

Implementation of a strong Code Compliance Monitoring Program

One of the positive effects of having to confront the Russian issue is that Code compliance is now carefully underpinned by the strong legal framework of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories, which came into effect in April 2018. Today, WADA is better positioned to oversee the quality of anti-doping programs worldwide via its new Compliance Monitoring Program. Thanks to a number of tools, including compliance audits, more than 10,000 corrective actions have been identified with in excess of 5,000 having been carried out by Anti-Doping Organizations worldwide. That is 5,000 ways in which the global anti-doping system has been improved. I wish to thank all Code Signatories for the energy and efforts that have been put into the implementation of the corrective actions and the Compliance Monitoring Program on the whole, which is contributing significantly to protecting the integrity of sport worldwide.

Approval of the 2021 Code and International Standard framework

This year also saw the approval of the latest edition of the World Anti-Doping Code and related International Standards after an exhaustive two-year review and consultation process. These documents, which are central to the entire global clean sport movement, were ratified at the highly successful World Conference on Doping in Sport that took place in Katowice, Poland, in November, and will come into force on 1 January 2021.

Ensuring that athletes understand the rules and their rights under the World Anti-Doping Program

We are serving athletes better now than ever before, not only in terms of ensuring clean sport but in the way that we facilitate their interaction with the anti-doping system. The ongoing overhaul of the Anti-Doping Administration Management System (ADAMS) and the launch of Athlete Central, an app that facilitates athlete compliance with whereabouts rules, are clear demonstrations of this progress, with more to follow shortly. We also continue to carry out our engaging athlete outreach programs at major events with the next one being carried out in January next year at the Youth Olympic Games in Lausanne, Switzerland, followed not long after that with the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

Another area of priority for athletes and others is education. An informal poll conducted at the WADA Annual Symposium in March, revealed that increasing research-led education was the top priority of anti-doping practitioners and, importantly, the most likely to make a difference for clean sport. This is why I am proud of what WADA, together with its stakeholders, has managed to achieve with the development of the International Standard for Education, which will come into force on 1 January 2021. This is the most significant advancement of education policy since the inception of the global anti-doping program in 2004.

A strengthened and evolving governance framework

In the interest of developing a WADA that is stronger and fit for the future, in 2016, the Agency embarked on a governance review that, in November 2018, resulted in a series of reforms that will make a significant difference in the way that the Agency is run. This includes, in particular, an independent presidency and vice-presidency, as well as the inclusion of an athlete on every one of our Standing Committees. All of these changes were consolidated in WADA’s governance documents in 2019 and more will follow in 2020, including the addition of two independent members to WADA’s 12-member Executive Committee. This reflects WADA’s willingness to adapt to an ever-changing world.

Engaging all stakeholders in building Clean Sport for the future

For the years ahead, it is very reassuring to know that the incoming President, former Polish Minister for Sport and Tourism and 400m runner Witold Banka, and Vice-President, double Olympic gold medal-winning short-track speed-skater Yang Yang, will have the support of the 150+ volunteers who make up WADA’s Board, Executive Committee, Standing Committees, Ethics Panel, and Expert and Advisory Groups. Their precious time, wise counsel and extensive knowledge are simply invaluable. Without their help, the challenges of promoting clean sport and protecting clean athletes would be insurmountable. With them, everything is possible.

Standing shoulder to shoulder with those volunteers are the dedicated scientists, physicians, lawyers, educators, investigators, compliance experts and more who make up WADA’s excellent staff. To have witnessed their development and passion for clean sport up close these past 20 years has been an inspiration.

Sport teaches that it is always possible to do better. The same applies to WADA. Successes are there to be appreciated while setbacks can be learned from. WADA’s staff and volunteers, its resources and its vision will ensure improvement continues long into the future. To these will be added the dynamism of former elite athletes in the two most senior governance positions. I wish them all the best as they take the WADA reins. And to all of you who are committed to clean sport, I would like to extend my very best wishes for the new year and beyond.

Sincerely,

Sir Craig Reedie
WADA President


27/12/19 WADA RECEIVES NOTICE OF RUSADA’S DISPUTE OF AGENCY’S EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE DECISION

Montreal, 27 December 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that, today, it received official notice from the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) disputing the unanimous endorsement by WADA’s Executive Committee on 9 December of the recommendation made by the independent Compliance Review Committee that RUSADA be declared non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) for a period of four years, with a range of consequences attached.

As RUSADA’s notice was received within the stipulated 21 days, the matter will be referred to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in accordance with the correct process outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS, Article 10.4.1).

As per the ISCCS, WADA will shortly file a formal notice of dispute with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), and the dispute will be resolved by the CAS Ordinary Arbitration Division.

As third parties may intervene or apply to intervene as set out in Article 23.5.7 of the Code within 10 days of WADA’s filing, WADA will make another public announcement immediately after filing its notice of dispute to CAS.

Further to Article 23.5.9 of the Code, any CAS decision in relation to the non-compliance, the proposed consequences and/or the proposed reinstatement conditions will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Signatories.

WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “WADA remains convinced that it made the right decision on 9 December. The proposed consequences are tough on the Russian authorities while robustly protecting the integrity of clean sport around the world. We will defend that decision with the utmost vigor at CAS.”


20/12/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2018 TESTING
FIGURES REPORT

Report Highlights

  • 6.9% increase in the overall number of samples analyzed: 322,050 in 2017 to 344,177 in 2018.
     
  • slight decrease in the total percentage of Adverse Analytical Findings (AAFs): 1.43% in 2017 (4,596 AAFs from 322,050 samples) to 1.42% in 2018 (4,896 AAFs from 344,177 samples).
     
  • About 60% of WADA-accredited Laboratories saw an increase in the total number of samples recorded.
     
  • An increase in the total number and percentage of non-Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) blood samples analyzed: 8.62% in 2017 (27,759 of 322,050) to 9.11% in 2018 (31,351 of 344,177).
     
  • An increase of 7% in the number of ABP blood samples tested: 29,130 in 2017 to 31,261 in 2018.

Montreal, 20 December 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) today publishes its 2018 Testing Figures Report (2018 Report), which summarizes the results of all the samples WADA-accredited Laboratories analyzed and reported in WADA’s Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS) in 2018.

This is the fourth set of global testing results since the 2015 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) came into effect. The 2018 Report – which includes an Executive Summary and sub-reports by Laboratory, Sport, Testing Authority and ABP Blood Analysis – includes in- and out-of-competition urine samples; blood and ABP blood data; and, the resulting AAFs and Atypical Findings (ATFs).

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The 2018 Testing Figures Report offers a comprehensive reflection of all doping control samples analyzed and reported by all WADA-accredited and -approved Laboratories around the world in 2018.

“The Report provides a wealth of information to the Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) and allows them to observe patterns of doping control programs by sport, organization, substance and laboratory. ADOs can then use this valuable intelligence to adapt their anti-doping strategies and better target test their athletes, thus helping to protect clean athletes and the integrity of sport.”

To help with the interpretation of the 2018 Report, we provide a comprehensive Question and Answer document. Of particular importance, please note that:

  • One single result does not necessarily correspond to one athlete. Results may correspond with multiple findings regarding the same athlete or measurements performed on the same athlete, such as in the case of longitudinal studies of testosterone.
     
  • The number of AAFs in the Report may not correspond with the number of Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) reported by ADOs. This is because all results are subject to a results management process conducted by ADOs, which includes matching results with Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs), and longitudinal studies which can result in no case to answer or no sanction.
     
  • As usual, this Report does not illustrate statistics on ADRVs, which are reported via a separate ADRV Report – the 2018 version of which will be released in 2020. The ADRV Report reveals analytical and non-analytical cases and the outcomes of results management, which is a process that can take a long time given that it may include investigations, appeals, etc.

19/12/19 WADA PUBLISHES ANTI-DOPING RULE VIOLATIONS REPORT FOR 2017

– The Report highlights 1,804 confirmed Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) in 2017, involving individuals from 114 nationalities and across 93 sports

– 1,459 ADRVs came from Adverse Analytical Findings and 345 from non-analytical, evidence-based intelligence
Montreal, 19 December 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) today publishes its fifth annual Anti-Doping Rule Violations’ (ADRVs’) Report, which is the official set of such figures under the World Anti-Doping Code. As usual, the report is available in a PDF version as well as a dynamic, Excel version that illustrates the ADRV results in an interactive fashion.
 
The report illustrates doping offences committed in global sport during 2017. It highlights that there were a total of 1,804 ADRVs recorded in that year. This represents an almost 13.1% increase relative to the 2016 figure of 1,595.
 
1,459 of the ADRVs came out of Adverse Analytical Findings (AAFs), commonly known as ‘positive’ results. The remainder were derived from investigations and evidence-based intelligence into 317 violations committed by athletes and 28 by athlete support personnel (ASP).
 
WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “When read in combination with WADA’s 2017 Testing Figures report that was published in July 2018, this ADRVs report gives a good insight into the quantity and type of ADRVs we are seeing as well as a sense of the progress being made. In particular, we are continuing to see the impact of intelligence-based testing, an area of increasing focus for the Agency as we strengthen our investigations and intelligence-gathering capacity. Indeed, the number of ADRVs as a result of non-analytical violations increased by about 28% between 2016 and 2017.
 
“While in- and out-of-competition testing remains critical to detect doping, events have recently shown that investigative work is becoming even more important as we look to protect clean athletes’ rights worldwide. In addition, the report also reminds us of the importance of evidence-based education to prevent doping in the first place. Education programs, such as those initiated by WADA, equip athletes with information intended to help them compete clean in the first place and to carry on making the right choices throughout their careers.”
 
The report contains all ADRV decisions reported to WADA by Anti-Doping Organizations. These decisions include those from AAFs reported in samples collected by Anti-Doping Organizations in 2017 as well as from non-analytical ADRV decisions rendered in 2017.
 
As with previous years, the beginning of the report comprises an introduction and an executive summary highlighting key data. The first and second sections present the Results Management outcomes (including ADRVs) of all AAFs detected by WADA-accredited Laboratories for samples collected in 2017 from athletes in- and out-of-competition. They are presented by sport, discipline (Section 1) and testing authority (Section 2).
 
Section 3 includes ADRVs that resulted from non-analytical findings committed by athletes (presented by sport and nationality) and by ASP (presented by nationality).
 
Section 4 indicates the total number of ADRVs in 2017, which includes AAFs that resulted in an ADRV plus all non-analytical ADRVs. It presents the data by sport and nationality. It is further broken down into type of samples (urine or blood), type of test (in- or out-of-competition) and athlete gender.
 
Consult the full report in PDF, the dynamic report in Excel and a document that answers the frequently asked questions.

17/12/19 WADA ISSUES CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR 2020 SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH GRANTS

Montreal, 17 December 2019 

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to issue a Call for Proposals for 2020 Scientific Research Grants.

Science is key to driving advances in anti-doping. Innovative, fact-based research helps the anti-doping community identify new trends in doping, new drugs, new delivery mechanisms and new methods of detection.   

Since 2001, WADA has committed more than US$ 80 million to helping researchers around the world develop breakthroughs in anti-doping science. These grants are critical because they increase the volume of research dedicated to developing new and improved detection methods for performance-enhancing substances and methods as well as attract the best minds to this cause.

Scientists interested in submitting research projects are invited to submit their applications by 1 March 2020 (24:00 GMT).

Learn more about the 2020 Scientific Research Grants Program and the application process.

Obtenga más información sobre la Convocatoria de subvenciones de investigación 2020 y el procedimiento de solicitud


13/12/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2021 MODEL RULES FOR CODE SIGNATORIES

Montreal, 13 December 2019 

Dear Colleagues,

On 26 November 2019, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards), which were approved by the Agency’s Executive Committee and Foundation Board, respectively, on 7 November.

Today, WADA is pleased to launch its 2021 Code Signatory Support Program, which WADA will develop and implement in coordination with Signatories and other partners through 2020. The Program aims to assist Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the Code and the Standards, which are mandatory components of the World Anti-Doping Program, that will enter into force on 1 January 2021. 

As a starting point, today WADA is publishing the 2021 Model Rules for Code Signatories (Model Rules), which will help National Anti-Doping Organizations, International Federations, Major Event Organizations and National Olympic Committees in drafting their new anti-doping rules in line with the 2021 Code. WADA encourages Signatories to draft and adopt a completely new set of anti-doping rules to ensure that they comply with the 2021 Code.  The 2021 Model Rules will guide Signatories through this process.

WADA kindly requests that once Signatories have drafted amended anti-doping rules, these draft rules be sent to compliance@wada-ama.org so that WADA can ensure that they are in line with the 2021 Code; can provide feedback if they are not; and, can ultimately approve them before the Signatory starts its internal process of adoption of the rules.

It should be noted that the French version of the Model Rules will be published by WADA in the coming months; and, in the near future, the Agency will provide more information regarding its Signatory Support Program that will prepare us all for January 2021.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


12/12/19 CORRECTION: WADA TO HOST CONFERENCE CALL FOR IFs AND MEOs REGARDING AGENCY’S EXCO DECISION OF 9 DECEMBER CONCERNING RUSADA COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 12 December 2019 

CORRECTION


Please take note that there was an error in the dial-in details of the above-noted communication, which we issued yesterday, that we have corrected below.
 
Sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused and best regards,
 
World Anti-Doping Agency

Montreal, 11 December 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that – this Friday 13 December at 08:00 EST (14:00 CET) – the Agency will host a conference call for International Federations (IFs) and Major Event Organizations (MEOs) regarding the Agency’s 9 December decision to declare the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code; and, its implications for IFs and MEOs.

In terms of format, the following speakers will first address participants; which, will then be followed by a question and answer session:

  • Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General
  • Jonathan Taylor QC, Chair, independent Compliance Review Committee
  • Gunter Younger, WADA Director, Intelligence and Investigations
  • Sébastien Gillot, Director, WADA European Office and International Federation Relations

To participate, simply follow the call-in instructions below. Should you have any questions regarding the call, please contact selva.balasingam@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency

Instructions on how to join the conference call:

  1. Dial the telephone number corresponding to your region from the list below
  2. An automated message will prompt you to enter the passcode 971783 
  3. You will then be connected to the conference call

Dial-in numbers:

LocationPhone TypePhone Number
ArgentinaTollfree/Freephone0800 444 8225
Argentina , Buenos AiresLocal+54 (0)11 5279 4038
AustraliaTollfree/Freephone1 800 590 693
Australia , BrisbaneLocal+61 (0)7 3105 0937
Australia , MelbourneLocal+61 (0)3 8317 0929
Australia , SydneyLocal+61 (0)2 9193 3719
AustriaTollfree/Freephone0800 005 386
Austria , ViennaLocal+43 (0)1 9289 265
BahrainTollfree/Freephone8000 4401
BelgiumTollfree/Freephone0800 58227
Belgium , BrusselsLocal+32 (0)2 400 1998
BrazilTollfree/Freephone0800 891 6844
Brazil , Sao PauloLocal+55 11 3181 5103
BulgariaTollfree/Freephone0800 15018
Bulgaria , SofiaLocal+359 (0)2 492 5695
Canada , TorontoLocal+1 647 484 0474
ChileTollfree/Freephone123 0020 8251
ChinaNational4001 209107
ColombiaTollfree/Freephone01 800 518 3336
CroatiaTollfree/Freephone0800 222 343
CyprusTollfree/Freephone800 96873
Czech RepublicTollfree/Freephone800 701 009
Czech Republic , PragueLocal+420 225 376 432
DenmarkTollfree/Freephone80 70 16 37
Denmark , CopenhagenLocal+45 35 15 80 48
EgyptTollfree/Freephone0800 000 9068
EstoniaTollfree/Freephone800 011 1864
Estonia , TallinnLocal+372 674 3051
FijiTollfree/Freephone00800 6416
FinlandTollfree/Freephone0800 770 349
Finland , HelsinkiLocal+358 (0)9 7479 0360
FranceTollfree/Freephone0805 119 536
France , ParisLocal+33 (0)1 76 77 22 73
GermanyTollfree/Freephone0800 589 4608
Germany , FrankfurtLocal+49 (0)69 2222 13426
Germany , MunichLocal+49 (0)89 2030 31236
GreeceTollfree/Freephone00800 128 566
Greece , AthensLocal+30 210 969 6487
Hong KongTollfree/Freephone800 961 113
Hong Kong , Hong KongLocal+852 3008 1533
HungaryTollfree/Freephone068 001 9356
Hungary , BudapestLocal+36 1429 2225
IcelandTollfree/Freephone800 9959
IndonesiaTollfree/Freephone007 803 321 8174
IrelandTollfree/Freephone1800 936 706
Ireland , DublinLocal+353 (0)1 246 5637
IsraelTollfree/Freephone1809 258 459
Israel , Tel AvivLocal+972 3376 1316
ItalyTollfree/Freephone800 145 966
Italy , MilanLocal+39 02 3600 8018
Italy , RomeLocal+39 06 8750 0722
JapanTollfree/Freephone0120 279 351
Japan , TokyoLocal+81 (0)3 4563 4407
JordanTollfree/Freephone80022551
Korea, Republic ofTollfree/Freephone007 9814 2032 544
Korea, Republic of , SeoulLocal+82 (0)2 3483 5433
LatviaTollfree/Freephone800 03394
Latvia , RigaLocal+371 6601 0123
LithuaniaTollfree/Freephone8800 30963
Lithuania , VilniusLocal+370 5205 4829
LuxembourgTollfree/Freephone800 24468
Luxembourg , LuxembourgLocal+352 2088 0403
MalaysiaTollfree/Freephone1800 806 804
Malaysia , Kuala LumpurLocal+60 (0)3 7724 0311
MexicoTollfree/Freephone01 800 062 2959
Mexico , Mexico CityLocal+52 55 4164 4819
NetherlandsTollfree/Freephone0800 023 0693
Netherlands , AmsterdamLocal+31 (0) 20 721 9250
New ZealandTollfree/Freephone0800 423 972
New Zealand , AucklandLocal+64 (0)9 9133 624
Nigeria , LagosLocal+234 1 277 2420
NorwayTollfree/Freephone800 51025
Norway , OsloLocal+47 2100 2613
OmanTollfree/Freephone800 77206
PanamaTollfree/Freephone00 800 226 4686
PeruTollfree/Freephone0800 77816
PhilippinesTollfree/Freephone1800 1110 2089
Philippines , ManilaLocal+63 2 8395 3395
PolandTollfree/Freephone00 800 121 4007
Poland , WarsawLocal+48 (0) 22 212 0674
PortugalTollfree/Freephone800 812 269
Portugal , LisbonLocal+351 210 608 015
QatarTollfree/Freephone00 800 100 441
RomaniaTollfree/Freephone0800 801 041
Romania , BucharestLocal+40 (0)31 811 0026
Russian FederationTollfree/Freephone8 800 500 9271
Russian Federation , MoscowLocal+7 495 213 1765
Saudi ArabiaTollfree/Freephone800 844 5726
SingaporeTollfree/Freephone800 186 5106
Singapore , SingaporeLocal+65 6320 9041
SlovakiaTollfree/Freephone0800 002 285
Slovakia , BratislavaLocal+421 (0) 2 5011 2129
SloveniaTollfree/Freephone0800 80316
Slovenia , LjubljanaLocal+386 1 888 8579
South AfricaTollfree/Freephone0800 999 581
South Africa , JohannesburgLocal+27 11 844 6053
SpainTollfree/Freephone800 600 847
Spain , MadridLocal+34 91 114 7292
SwedenTollfree/Freephone0200 883 447
Sweden , StockholmLocal+46 (0)8 5033 6573
SwitzerlandTollfree/Freephone0800 200 829
Switzerland , GenevaLocal+41 (0)22 567 5728
Switzerland , ZurichLocal+41 (0)44 580 7230
TaiwanTollfree/Freephone0800 868 018
Taiwan, TaipeiLocal+886 (0)2 8793 3294
ThailandTollfree/Freephone1800 011 070
TurkeyTollfree/Freephone00800 4488 29005
TurkeyNational850 390 2793
UkraineTollfree/Freephone0800 503 479
United Arab EmiratesTollfree/Freephone8000 3570 2606
United KingdomTollfree/Freephone0800 358 6374
United Kingdom , LocalLocal+44 (0)330 336 9104
United States , Los AngelesLocal+1 323-701-0223
United States/CanadaTollfree/Freephone888-378-4398
UruguayTollfree/Freephone0004 019 0982
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofTollfree/Freephone0800 100 8397
Viet NamTollfree/Freephone1800 400 493

11/12/19 WADA TO HOST CONFERENCE CALL FOR IFs AND MEOs REGARDING AGENCY’S EXCO DECISION OF 9 DECEMBER CONCERNING RUSADA COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 11 December 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that – this Friday 13 December at 08:00 EST (14:00 CET) – the Agency will host a conference call for International Federations (IFs) and Major Event Organizations (MEOs) regarding the Agency’s 9 December decision to declare the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code; and, its implications for IFs and MEOs.

In terms of format, the following speakers will first address participants; which, will then be followed by a question and answer session:

  • Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General
  • Jonathan Taylor QC, Chair, independent Compliance Review Committee
  • Gunter Younger, WADA Director, Intelligence and Investigations
  • Sébastien Gillot, Director, WADA European Office and International Federation Relations

To participate, simply follow the call-in instructions below. Should you have any questions regarding the call, please contact selva.balasingam@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency

Instructions on how to join the conference call:

  1. Dial the telephone number corresponding to your region from the list below
  2. An automated message will prompt you to enter the passcode 151 848 7737 followed by the sign
  3. You will then be connected to the conference call

Dial-in numbers:

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9/12/19 WADA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE UNANIMOUSLY ENDORSES FOUR-YEAR PERIOD OF NON-COMPLIANCE FOR THE RUSSIAN ANTI-DOPING AGENCY

Lausanne, 9 December 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Executive Committee (ExCo) unanimously endorsed the recommendation made by the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) that the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) be declared non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) for a period of four years.
 
Meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland, the 12-member ExCo supported the CRC’s recommendation, which includes a series of strong consequences and conditions of reinstatement in accordance with the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS).
 
The Chair of the CRC, Jonathan Taylor QC, took ExCo members through the CRC’s recommendation, which had been provided to ExCo members on 25 November together with the report of WADA Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) and that of the independent forensic experts from Lausanne University’s Institute of Forensic Science. This was followed by a number of questions from members, and discussions on specific aspects of the recommendation.
 
WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “The ExCo’s strong decision today shows WADA’s determination to act resolutely in the face of the Russian doping crisis, thanks to the Agency’s robust investigatory capability, the vision of the CRC, and WADA’s recently acquired ability to recommend meaningful sanctions via the Compliance Standard which entered into effect in April 2018. Combined, these strengths have enabled the ExCo to make the right decisions at the right time.

“For too long, Russian doping has detracted from clean sport. The blatant breach by the Russian authorities of RUSADA’s reinstatement conditions, approved by the ExCo in September 2018, demanded a robust response. That is exactly what has been delivered today. Russia was afforded every opportunity to get its house in order and re-join the global anti-doping community for the good of its athletes and of the integrity of sport, but it chose instead to continue in its stance of deception and denial. As a result, the WADA ExCo has responded in the strongest possible terms, while protecting the rights of Russian athletes that can prove that they were not involved and did not benefit from these fraudulent acts.

“On behalf of the ExCo, and of the many WADA stakeholders that supported the CRC recommendation, I would like to thank the members of the CRC for their expert and considered recommendation, as well as WADA I&I and the forensic experts for their skill, diligence and perseverance in getting to the bottom of this highly complex case.”

CRC Recommendation

The 26-page CRC recommendation outlines the key facts, which are mainly derived from the reports of WADA I&I and the forensic experts. These reports conclude that the Moscow data was intentionally altered prior to and while it was being forensically copied by WADA in January 2019.
 
To this end, the RUSADA reinstatement conditions, which were agreed by the WADA ExCo in September 2018 were not fulfilled in that the Moscow data are neither complete nor authentic. Jonathan Taylor reminded ExCo members that, in September 2018, the ExCo had deemed the requirement to provide an authentic copy to be a ‘Critical’ condition of the decision to reinstate RUSADA to the list of Code-compliant Signatories. It was deemed ‘Critical’ because:

  • it would enable the anti-doping community finally to resolve and draw a line under the allegations of a systematic conspiracy to dope Russian athletes;
  • it would ensure that any Russian athletes who had tested positive could be punished; and
  • just as importantly it would ensure that innocent Russian athletes could be cleared of suspicion.

The WADA I&I report was based in particular on a forensic review of inconsistencies found in some of the data that were obtained by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. Following WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA, this review also included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions raised by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts.

Based on the reports, it was clear to the ExCo that the Moscow data were neither complete nor fully authentic. As comprehensively outlined in the reports, some data were removed, others altered and, in some cases, system messages were fabricated in an effort to hamper the work of WADA investigators. In addition, measures were taken to conceal these manipulations by back-dating of computer systems and data files in an attempt to make it appear that the Moscow data had been in their current state since 2015.

Having considered all the facts and the recommendation – including the consequences and the reinstatement conditions – the ExCo endorsed the entirety of the CRC recommendation. WADA will now send a formal notice to RUSADA, asserting non-compliance with the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow data, and proposing the following consequences, to come into effect on the date on which the decision that RUSADA is non-compliant becomes final and to remain in effect until the fourth anniversary of that date (‘the Four-Year Period’):

Series of Consequences

  • Russian Government officials/representatives may not be appointed to sit and may not sit as members of the boards or committees or any other bodies of any Code Signatory (or its members) or association of Signatories.
  • Russian Government officials/representatives may not participate in or attend any of the following events held in the Four-Year Period: (a) the Youth Olympic Games (summer and winter); (b) the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (summer and winter); (c) any other event organized by a Major Event Organisation; and (d) any World Championships organized or sanctioned by any Signatory (together, the Major Events).
  • Russia may not host in the Four-Year Period or bid for or be granted in the Four-Year Period, the right to host (whether during or after the Four-Year Period) any editions of the Major Events.
  • Where the right to host a Major Event in the Four-Year Period has already been awarded to Russia, the Signatory must withdraw that right and re-assign the event to another country, unless it is legally or practically impossible to do so. In addition, Russia may not bid for the right to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, irrespective of whether the bidding takes place during or after the Four-Year Period.
  • Russia’s flag may not be flown at any Major Event staged in the Four-Year Period.
  • Neither the President, the Secretary-General, the CEO, nor any member of the Executive Board/Governing Board of either the Russian Olympic Committee or the Russian Paralympic Committee may participate in or attend any Major Event staged in the Four-Year Period.
  • Russian athletes and their support personnel may only participate in Major Events staged in the Four-Year Period where they are able to demonstrate that they are not implicated in any way by the non-compliance with conditions including (without limitation) that they are not mentioned in incriminating circumstances in the McLaren reports, there are no positive findings reported for them in the database and no data relating to their samples has been manipulated, and that they have been subject to adequate in-competition and out-of-competition testing prior to the event in question according to WADA, in accordance with strict conditions to be defined by WADA (or the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), if it sees fit), pursuant to the mechanism foreseen in ISCCS Article 11.2.6. In this circumstance, they may not represent the Russian Federation.
  • Given the aggravating factors that are present in this case, RUSADA must pay all WADA’s costs on this file incurred since January 2019 and, in addition, a fine to WADA of 10% of its 2019 income or USD 100,000 (whichever is lower). This is the maximum fine available under the rules and all monies must be paid before the end of the Four-Year Period.

CRC Chair, Jonathan Taylor QC, said: “Today, the ExCo has delivered a strong and unequivocal decision. While being tough on the authorities, this recommendation avoids punishing the innocent and instead stands up for the rights of clean athletes everywhere. If an athlete from Russia can prove that they were not involved in the institutionalized doping program, that their data were not part of the manipulation, that they were subject to adequate testing prior to the event in question, and that they fulfil any other strict conditions to be determined, they will be allowed to compete.

“WADA now has the names of all suspicious athletes in the LIMS database, and thanks to the painstakingly forensic nature of the investigation, this includes the athletes whose data was manipulated or even deleted, including the 145 athletes within WADA’s target group of most suspicious athletes but also others beyond that target group.

While I understand the calls for a blanket ban on all Russian athletes whether or not they are implicated by the data, it was the unanimous view of the CRC, which includes an athlete, that in this case, those who could prove their innocence should not be punished, and I am pleased that the WADA ExCo agreed with this.”

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The fundamental objective of the new Compliance Standard is to maintain the confidence of stakeholders in the commitment of WADA and its partners to do what is necessary to defend the integrity of sport against the scourge of doping. The September 2018 decision to reinstate RUSADA under strict conditions broke a long-standing impasse by allowing WADA to deal with this matter under the strong legal framework of the new Compliance Standard. Since then, WADA I&I acquired the Moscow data and samples, more than 40 cases unaffected by the data manipulation and 14 cases from re-analysis of the samples have been shared respectively with International Federations and RUSADA for action – with more cases to come – and the sanctions endorsed by the ExCo today for manipulation of some of the data are strong and meaningful in a manner that could not have been achieved under the old rules.”

RUSADA’s Operations

As it relates to RUSADA, the ExCo concurred with the CRC’s view that “the evidence (including from WADA’s recent audits of RUSADA’s operations) indicates that RUSADA’s work is effective in contributing to the fight against doping in Russian sport, and that it is working productively in cooperation with other Anti-Doping Organizations, including in investigations within Russia”. Therefore, the ExCo accepted the recommendation not to impose any special monitoring or supervision or takeover of RUSADA’s anti-doping activities in the Four-Year Period.”

However, one of the conditions of reinstatement will be that WADA remains satisfied throughout the Four-Year Period that RUSADA’s independence is being respected and there is no improper outside interference with its operations.

Next Steps

As WADA communicated on 5 December, RUSADA will now have 21 days to accept the above-referenced notice.

  • If RUSADA disputes WADA’s allegation, the matter will be referred to CAS (ISCCS Art. 10.4.1). Under the ISCCS, “If the Signatory wishes to dispute the asserted non-compliance and/or the proposed Signatory Consequences and/or the proposed Reinstatement conditions, then (in accordance with Article 23.5.6 of the Code) it must notify WADA in writing within twenty-one days of its receipt of the notice from WADA. WADA shall then file a formal notice of dispute with CAS, and the dispute will be resolved by the CAS Ordinary Arbitration Division.” Further to Article 23.5.9 of the Code, any CAS decision in relation to the non-compliance, the proposed consequences and/or the proposed reinstatement conditions will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Signatories.
  • If RUSADA does not dispute WADA’s allegation, the consequences of non-compliance and the reinstatement conditions proposed by WADA will become a final decision, and any party that would have had a right under Code Article 23.5.7 to intervene in the CAS proceedings that would have taken place if RUSADA had disputed any aspect of WADA’s notice, has the right to appeal WADA’s decision to the CAS Appeals Arbitration Division within 21 days of the publication of RUSADA’s decision by WADA (ISCCS Art. 10.3.2). If no party appeals during these 21 days, the final decision must be recognized and enforced by all Code Signatories. If there is an appeal, the eventual CAS decision is binding on and must be recognized and enforced by all Code Signatories.

 
Meanwhile, WADA will liaise with Code Signatories and other stakeholders who may be affected by this decision, in order to clarify the next steps while bearing in mind that the case may still be appealed to CAS. To be clear, given the timing of this recommendation, it will not apply to next month’s Youth Olympic Games in Lausanne.


5/12/19 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION PHASE FOR THE 2021 INTERNATIONAL STANDARD FOR LABORATORIES, VERSION 11.0

Montreal, 5 December 2019 

Dear Colleagues,

On 26 November 2019, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards). These documents were approved by the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board), respectively, during WADA’s World Conference on Doping in Sport that was held from 5-7 November 2019; and, they will come into force on 1 January 2021.

As previously communicated, as it relates to the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), the situation is slightly different. Following the World Conference, WADA reviewed the ISL v. 10.0 that was approved by the ExCo in May 2019 to incorporate any relevant modifications; and, in particular, to ensure consistency with the other documents that were approved during the World Conference.

Accordingly, today, WADA launches a Stakeholder Consultation Phase for the 2021 ISL, v. 11.0. The Agency outlines below the main modifications between the current 2019 ISL v. 10.0 and the future 2021 ISL v. 11.0; and, encourages Stakeholders to provide comments by 1 March 2020.

  1. Updated definitions in Section 3.0;
  2. Reorganized Section 5.0 – Analysis of Samples;
  3. Footnotes that were transferred into the text as comments;
  4. An explanation regarding Laboratory testing for non-Code Signatories, which is provided in Annex A – Code of Ethics; and
  5. Creation of a new Annex B – Testing for Major Events. 

Following the consultation phase, WADA will consider the comments received and will submit the revised version for approval to WADA’s May 2020 ExCo meeting for entry into force on 1 January 2021, alongside the revised Code and the other Standards.

To Submit Feedback 

The 2021 ISL, v. 11.0 can be accessed via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online consultation platform. As indicated above, we would ask you to provide comments no later than 1 March 2020 via WADAConnect. Easy to use, WADAConnect will prompt you to create a user account and input your comments regarding aspects of the ISL v. 11.0 that are of particular interest to you. For more information related to WADAConnect, please refer to the simple user guide.

Stakeholders are kindly asked, to the extent possible, to draw on practical experiences and propose recommendations that would benefit the fight for clean sport worldwide. In addition, stakeholders are kindly asked to be as specific and clear as possible when making submissions, i.e. by proposing concrete text replacing the existing draft.

We look forward to receiving your feedback.

Thank you – best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


4/12/19 REMINDER: WADA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2020 STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER VACANCIES

Montreal, 4 December 2019 – On 25 September 2019, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announced that it was seeking nominations for 2020 for a number of vacant member positions on its five Standing Committees, which report into WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board); and, today, we wish to remind you that the deadline for submitting nominations is 20 December 2019.
 
The successful candidates will take office on or before 1 March 2020, which is the date that the nominations are expected to be approved by WADA’s ExCo.
 
There are various vacant positions on WADA’s five Committees in 2020. The number of vacancies varies per Committee subject to the current composition and rotation that is in place. The five Committees are:

  1. Athlete Committee   
  2. Compliance Review Committee
  3. Education Committee
  4. Finance and Administration Committee     
  5. Health, Medical and Research Committee  

[Note that there is one vacant position on the Compliance Review Committee and it is specifically to represent the Public Authorities.]
 
In accordance with WADA’s governing rules concerning Standing Committee composition and rotation, on an annual basis, the Agency seeks nominations from its stakeholders for candidates to fill upcoming vacancies. Accordingly, WADA invites its stakeholders to consider their respective regions and organizations; and, to nominate suitable candidates.
 
It must be noted that, in 2017 and 2018, WADA carried out a governance review, which resulted in a series of reforms that were endorsed by WADA’s Board in November 2018; including that, WADA’s Standing Committees are to be composed of a maximum of 12 members. In the past, some of the Committees have exceeded this number; and therefore, in order to adhere to this number and achieve an equal rotation, a maximum of four members only change each year based on terms of three years. However, in 2020, given that the positions of Chair are also vacant, there is a maximum of three member vacancies per Committee.
 
Also, exceptionally for 2020, Member terms will commence on 1 March vs. 1 January. This is due to the timing of certain governance reforms, which must be completed before the Standing Committees can be presented for approval by WADA’s ExCo.
 
Another recommendation resulting from the governance review was that the Education, Finance and Administration, and Health, Medical and Research Standing Committees must include an Athlete and a National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO) representative. Some Committees already have such members; whereas, others need to be appointed for 2020. We encourage Athletes and NADOs to consider these opportunities.
 
Standing Committee Member Role

Below, WADA is pleased to provide links to the revised Terms of Reference for each WADA Standing Committee, which outlines the scope of work and details the functioning of the respective Committees.

How to apply

To be considered, all nominations must include the following and be forwarded by Friday, 20 December 2019, to Mr Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General (c/o e-mail: marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org or fax: +1 514 904 8743):

  • an updated curriculum vitae, which fully outlines the candidate’s experience and expertise; and
  • a letter of endorsement from one of WADA’s current Board members or a recognized WADA stakeholder group.

Any questions can also be directed to Mr Niggli, c/o Ms Chinnarassen.
 
About WADA 

Formed in 1999, WADA is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the Sports Movement and Governments of the world. As the global regulatory body, WADA’s primary role is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Its key activities include: ensuring and monitoring effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code and its related International Standards; scientific and social science research; education; intelligence and investigations; and building anti-doping capacity with anti-doping organizations worldwide.
 
WADA’s vision is a world where all athletes can compete in a doping-free sporting environment; and, the Agency’s mission is to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport.
 
WADA is composed of a 38-member Board,  which is WADA’s supreme decision-making body; a 12-member ExCo, which is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and several Committees. The Board and ExCo are composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments. The Board delegates the actual management and running of the Agency, including the performance of activities and the administration of assets, to the ExCo.


4/12/19 CORRECTION: WADA PUBLISHES REVISED INTERNATIONAL STANDARD FOR TESTING AND INVESTIGATIONS

Montreal, 4 December 2019 
Please take note that there was an error in the fourth paragraph of the French version of the above-noted communication, which we issued yesterday, that we have corrected below. The specific correction is as follows:

Pour les sportifs qui produisent un échantillon dont la gravité spécifique le volume est supérieur à 90 ml, mais inférieur à 150 ml, l’exigence en matière de gravité spécifique de 1,005 demeure.

Sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused and best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


3/12/19 WADA PUBLISHES REVISED INTERNATIONAL STANDARD FOR TESTING AND INVESTIGATIONS

Montreal, 3 December 2019 

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the revised International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI), which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) on 4 November 2019 and enters into force on 1 March 2020. It should be noted that this is an exceptional revision to the ISTI, which is in advance of other approved revisions that will come into force on 1 January 2021 along with, the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code and other International Standards that were approved by WADA’s Foundation Board and ExCo in November. 

The revisions to the ISTI, which come into force on 1 March 2020, are specifically related to the requirement for urine samples to meet a suitable specific gravity for analysis.

As outlined in the revised ISTI, starting on 1 March 2020, the minimum volume of urine required for analysis will remain at 90ml; however, if an athlete can provide 150ml or more of urine, the minimum specific gravity measurement (using a refractometer) will be lowered to 1.003 or above instead of the current 1.005 or above.

If the athlete provides a sample with a volume greater than 90ml but less than 150ml, the current specific gravity measurement of 1.005 (using a refractometer) will remain applicable. 

Athletes who provide a sample with a specific gravity measurement lower than the above measurements will be required to continue to provide a sample until they reach a suitable specific gravity measurement.

These revisions, which were endorsed by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group, recognize significant enhancements in the sensitivity of laboratory analytical methods made over the past 20 years and will reduce the amount of time some athletes spend in doping control stations, making the process more athlete-friendly, while presenting a potential saving in resources for Anti-Doping Organizations.

It is also important to note that these revisions to the specific gravity measurement will be applied during the Tokyo Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Should you have any questions regarding the above revisions to the ISTI, please feel free to contact Wendy.Butts@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


29/11/19 WADA OPENS REGISTRATION FOR 2020 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

Montreal, 29 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that online registration is now open for the 16th edition of the Agency’s Annual Symposium. The Symposium, which will be held at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne, Switzerland on 17-18 March 2020 will, due to the success of last year’s format, follow with an entirely dedicated Athlete Session on 19 March.

The WADA Symposium, which is the main event on the global anti-doping calendar, gathers anti-doping practitioners from around the world and provides them with the opportunity to interact and learn from one another. The Symposium will once again welcome athletes, representatives from Anti-Doping Organizations, Governments, WADA-accredited Laboratories and Athlete Passport Management Units; as well as, other stakeholders such as the media, researchers and service providers — all that are integral to clean sport.

Under the theme “Bringing the 2021 Code and Standards into action”, the 2020 Symposium will primarily aim to assist World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the 2021 Code and International Standards, which will enter into force on 1 January 2021.

Athlete Session

As it relates to the dedicated Athlete Session on 19 March, under the leadership of WADA’s Athlete Committee, the Agency will once again welcome participation of athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies. Anti-Doping Organizations are asked to encourage the participation of athlete representatives, which are invited to participate in the Symposium and in the Athlete Session free of charge, in order to maximize athlete attendance and voices. With former elite athletes Witold Banka and Yang Yang assuming their roles as WADA President and Vice-President, respectively, on 1 January 2020, we are confident that athletes will increasingly be engaged to positively influence the global pursuit of Clean Sport.

Registration

Should you wish to register for the Symposium and/or the Athlete Session (which is exclusively dedicated to athletes, athlete representatives and administrators of athlete representative bodies), please do so on the Symposium Website by 26 February 2020. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the preliminary program, how to register and how to book your hotel accommodations.

Please note that in an effort to harmonize the registration process across all WADA events, the Agency has recently updated its registration terms and conditions. We strongly recommend that all stakeholders review them before registering.

WADA looks forward to welcoming you in Lausanne as the Agency partners with all stakeholders to bring the 2021 Code and Standards into action. Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


27/11/19 WADA LAUNCHES ITS NEW ATHLETE CENTRAL WHEREABOUTS APP

Montreal, 27 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that as of today, Athlete Central, the Agency’s new App that facilitates athlete compliance with Whereabouts rules under the global anti-doping program, is available for use and download from the Apple Store and Google Play. Athlete Central, which is powered by WADA’s Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS), replaces WADA’s current App that has been operational for a few years and required modernizing.
 
Whereabouts rules, which are a key component of global sport’s crucial out-of-competition testing programs, are part of the International Standard for Testing and Investigations. The rules require a limited number of top-level athletes within a Registered Testing Pool (RTP) to provide their Anti-Doping Organization (ADO) with details of where they can be found for one hour every day. 
 
WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “We are very pleased that WADA’s launch of Athlete Central will dramatically improve and facilitate the athlete experience in complying with their Whereabouts requirements. The new app will allow WADA and ADOs to better support clean athletes, who want to be able to compete on a level playing field. Since the inception of Whereabouts rules, these rules have been modified and improved to make them more user-friendly and less intrusive while retaining their impact. Today, we can proudly say that we have gone one step further in WADA’s mission to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping free sport.”
 
To better understand the needs of its key beneficiaries – the athletes, Athlete Central was developed taking careful consideration of their feedback. WADA’s project team solicited athletes’ views actively and received 2,500 unique submissions that then shaped the App’s specifications. In addition, in the lead-up to today’s launch, some ADO staff tested the App and a significant number of active athletes have been trialing it to file their Whereabouts. WADA also provided a demo of Athlete Central to interested athletes and other participants of the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, that was held from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland.
 
WADA Deputy Director, Standards & Harmonization and Principal, ADAMS Advancement, Stuart Kemp, said: “This is a significant milestone in the ADAMS ‘Next Gen’ project and athlete feedback was paramount in delivering what we believe is a new, easy and secure way for athletes to provide their Whereabouts. Features such as location-based address recommendations, dashboard, push notifications and Single Sign-On (SSO), will positively impact the way athletes provide Whereabouts information, making it easier to comply anytime, anywhere. We hope Athlete Central meets athletes’ expectations and we look forward to delivering the next modules of ADAMS ‘Next Gen’ to the anti-doping community.
  
For more information, please:

 About ADAMS
 
ADAMS is a secure and free, web-based system that centralizes doping control-related information such as athlete Whereabouts, testing history, laboratory results, the Athlete Biological Passport, Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs) and information on Anti-Doping Rule Violations.
 
In 2017, significant upgrades to ADAMS’ underlying infrastructure laid the foundation for the complete rebuild of ADAMS, which will serve all athletes and anti-doping stakeholders better going forward. Referred to as ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS, the rebuild prioritizes mobility of ADAMS use, enhanced connectivity, reliability and performance, as well as general usability. All of ADAMS’ new features are also designed with privacy, information security, and transparency for end users as a priority.
 
Planning and development of ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS first focused on the development of Athlete Central. Other modules are to follow, which WADA will communicate to stakeholders in due course.


26/11/19 WADA LAUNCHES ITS NEW ATHLETE CENTRAL WHEREABOUTS APP

Montreal, 26 November 2019

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to inform Anti-Doping Organizations that beginning tomorrow, 27 November, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) new Athlete Central Whereabouts app will be available for download and use from the Apple Store and Google Play.

As previously communicated, Athlete Central is WADA’s new App that will facilitate athlete compliance with Whereabouts rules under the global anti-doping program. Athlete Central will replace WADA’s current App that has been operational for a few years and required modernizing.

Athlete Central is the first module of WADA’s Anti-Doping and Administration Management System (ADAMS) ‘Next Gen’ project, which is one of WADA’s strategic priorities. The ‘Next Gen’ project intends to rebuild ADAMS in a way that better serves all athletes and anti-doping stakeholders going forward. It prioritizes mobility of ADAMS use, enhanced connectivity, reliability and performance, as well as general usability. Other modules are to follow, which WADA will communicate to you in due course.

In order to support the deployment of Athlete Central, we have prepared the following communications tools for Anti-Doping Organizations that can be leveraged via your communication channels.

  • Email Signatures – you can choose your preferred one, or alternate them
  • Promotional Poster – PDF version for print
  • Fact Sheet
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Images for your social media channels

You can download these tools by visiting the Athlete Central page of WADA’s website.

Should you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact us at athletecentral@wada-ama.org.

We would also very much welcome your and your athletes’ feedback about Athlete Central.

Thank you for your support and best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


26/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES APPROVED 2021 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Montreal, 26 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards), which were approved by the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) – as relates to the Standards – and Foundation Board (Board) – as relates to the Code – at the conclusion of WADA’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport on 7 November 2019. The 2021 Code and Standards are set to come into force on 1 January 2021.

[As regards the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), the situation is slightly different. The new version approved in May 2019 will now be reviewed in order to reflect and incorporate any relevant changes into the Standard and to ensure consistency with the other documents that were approved during the World Conference. The amended draft will then be circulated for stakeholder consultation from 10 December 2019 to 4 March 2020; following which, it will be tabled at WADA’s September 2020 ExCo meeting for approval. It will subsequently enter into force on 1 January 2021, along with the revised Code and all other Standards.]

The Agency is also pleased to publish the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act (previously known as the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights), which was also approved by WADA’s ExCo on 7 November. The Act, which was developed by WADA’s Athlete Committee in consultation with thousands of athletes and stakeholders worldwide, is based on the 2021 Code and Standards and aims to ensure that athlete rights within anti-doping are clearly set out, accessible, and universally applicable.

The approved versions of the Code, Standards and Act will now be translated into French and branded; following which, the final versions will be published on WADA’s website in early 2020.

2021 Code Review Process

In December 2017, WADA initiated a 2021 Code Review Process, which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code; two for the related Standards and one for the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to further strengthen the global anti-doping program.

Following the review process, stakeholders were invited to intervene publicly on the proposed Code and Standards during the World Conference – an opportunity which was taken up by over 70 stakeholder organizations – before the Code and the full suite of Standards were approved by the Board and ExCo respectively.

WADA is confident that the Review Process – which was reported upon on multiple occasions to the Agency’s ExCo and Board – was extensive and transparent. The Agency is grateful to all stakeholders for their high-quality feedback and to the drafting teams that have delivered on this momentous effort that will result in greater protection for Clean Sport.

WADA’s 2021 Code Implementation Stakeholder Support Program

On 18 October, WADA published a Development and Implementation Guide for Stakeholders, which summarizes matters of importance related to the Review Process; in particular:

  • the significant changes between the current 2015 Code and the 2021 Code;
  • the significant changes between the current Standards and the recently approved Standards; and
  • a summary of the key topics being addressed in the new Standards.

The Guide also touches upon WADA’s Stakeholder Support Program, which WADA will develop and coordinate with partners in 2020. Our aim is to assist Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the Code and the Standards that will enter into force on 1 January 2021. 

More information related to the Support Program, including the resources that will be made available for Signatories, will be shared in 2020. In the meantime, should you have any questions regarding the above-mentioned documents, please feel free to contact: code@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


25/11/19 WADA COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS SERIES OF STRONG CONSEQUENCES FOR RUSADA NON-COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 25 November 2019 – Having considered a report from the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) and independent forensic experts, WADA’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) has recommended to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) that the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) be declared non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), as announced by WADA on 22 November 2019. This recommendation is accompanied by strong proposed consequences and conditions of reinstatement.   
 
The CRC’s recommendation was delivered to the ExCo in accordance with the agreed process under the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS). Because the contents of the document have since appeared in part in the media, WADA is now making the following details of the CRC recommendation public. The ExCo will consider the recommendation at a specially convened meeting in Paris on 9 December 2019.
 
CRC recommendation in relation to non-compliance with data requirement
 
The 26-page CRC recommendation, which is signed by CRC Chair, Jonathan Taylor QC, reminds the ExCo that as part of the 20 September 2018 decision to reinstate RUSADA to the list of Code-compliant Signatories, “WADA’s ExCo deemed the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow Data to be ‘Critical’ because:

  1. it would enable the anti-doping community finally to resolve and draw a line under the allegations of a systematic conspiracy to dope Russian athletes;
  2. it would ensure that any Russian athletes who had tested positive could be punished; and
  3. just as importantly it would ensure that innocent Russian athletes could be cleared of suspicion.”

The WADA I&I report was based in particular on a forensic review of inconsistencies found in some of the data that were obtained by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. Following WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA, this review also included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions raised by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts.

Based on the reports issued by WADA I&I and the experts at the conclusion of their review, the CRC determined that:

  • The Moscow data are neither complete nor fully authentic. In particular, while the 2019 copy of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) database matches in many respects the 2015 copy of the LIMS database provided to WADA by a whistleblower in 2017, hundreds of presumptive adverse analytical findings that appear in the 2015 copy of the LIMS database have been removed from the 2019 copy, and the related underlying raw data and PDF files have been deleted or altered.
  • Some of the presumptive positive findings and related evidence were removed in 2016 or 2017, after the general scheme to cover up the doping of Russian athletes was first revealed by Dr Rodchenkov and then quickly confirmed by Prof. Richard McLaren’s investigation (Part 1 and Part 2). However, further significant deletions and/or alterations were made in December 2018 and January 2019 (i.e., after the WADA ExCo imposed the data requirement). These activities were concealed by back-dating of computer systems and data files in an attempt to make it appear that the Moscow data had been in their current state since 2015. Furthermore, the commands issued to execute the manipulations, deletions and back-dating were also deleted, in an attempt to avoid detection of what had been done.
  • In addition, on or after 25 November 2018 (i.e., again, after the data requirement was imposed), but before 10 January 2019 (i.e., before the Moscow data were made available to the WADA team), someone in the Moscow Laboratory:

    – planted fabricated evidence into the LIMS database (purported messages between laboratory staff members) to support the argument now being advanced by the Russian authorities that it was Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov and two co-conspirators who falsified entries in the Moscow LIMS database as part of a scheme to extort money from athletes; and
    – deleted from the LIMS database important evidence proving that another laboratory staff member was involved in the cover-up of doping by Russian athletes in 2014 and 2015. That staff member is currently an important witness for the Russian side in several cases, in which he denies there was any conspiracy to protect Russian athletes from exposure for doping, and calls Dr. Rodchenkov a liar.

The CRC concluded that this is “an extremely serious case of non-compliance with the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow data, with several aggravating features”.

CRC recommendation in relation to consequences (abridged)

The CRC has therefore recommended that WADA send a formal notice to RUSADA, asserting non-compliance with the requirement to provide an authentic copy of the Moscow data, and proposing the following consequences, to come into effect on the date on which the decision that RUSADA is non-compliant becomes final and to remain in effect until the fourth anniversary of that date (‘the Four Year Period’):

  • Russian Government officials/representatives may not be appointed to sit and may not sit as members of the boards or committees or any other bodies of any Code Signatory (or its members) or association of Signatories.
  • Russian Government officials/representatives may not participate in or attend any of the following events held in the Four Year Period: (a) the Youth Olympic Games (summer and winter); (b) the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (summer and winter); (c) any other event organized by a Major Event Organisation; and (d) any World Championships organized or sanctioned by any Signatory (together, the Major Events).
  • Russia may not host in the Four Year Period, or bid for or be granted in the Four Year Period, the right to host (whether during or after the Four Year Period) any editions of the Major Events.
  • Where the right to host a Major Event in the Four Year Period has already been awarded to Russia, the Signatory must withdraw that right and re-assign the event to another country, unless it is legally or practically impossible to do so. In addition, Russia may not bid for the right to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, irrespective of whether the bidding takes place during or after the Four Year Period.
  • Russia’s flag may not be flown at any Major Event staged in the Four Year Period.
  • Neither the President, the Secretary-General, the CEO, nor any member of the Executive Board/Governing Board of either the Russian Olympic Committee or the Russian Paralympic Committee may participate in or attend any Major Event staged in the Four Year Period.
  • Russian athletes and their support personnel may only participate in Major Events staged in the Four Year Period where they are able to demonstrate that they are not implicated in any way by the non-compliance (i.e., they are not mentioned in incriminating circumstances in the McLaren reports, there are no positive findings reported for them in the database, and no data relating to their samples has been manipulated), in accordance with strict conditions to be defined by WADA (or the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), if it sees fit), pursuant to the mechanism foreseen in ISCCS Article 11.2.6. In this circumstance, they may not represent the Russian Federation.
  • Given the aggravating factors that are present in this case, RUSADA must pay all WADA’s costs on this file incurred since January 2019 and, in addition, a fine to WADA of 10% of its 2019 income or USD 100,000 (whichever is lower). This is the maximum fine available under the rules.

CRC recommendation concerning RUSADA’s operations
 
The CRC recommendation states that “the evidence (including from WADA’s recent audits of RUSADA’s operations) indicates that RUSADA’s work is effective in contributing to the fight against doping in Russian sport, and that it is working productively in cooperation with other Anti-Doping Organizations, including in investigations within Russia. Therefore, the CRC does not recommend any special monitoring or supervision or takeover of RUSADA’s anti-doping activities in the Four Year Period.”
 
However, one of the conditions of reinstatement is that WADA Management remains satisfied throughout the Four Year Period that RUSADA’s independence is being respected and there is no improper outside interference with its operations.
 
Next steps
 
On 9 December 2019, WADA’s ExCo will meet to discuss the CRC’s recommendation. If the ExCo accepts the recommendation, formal notice will be sent to RUSADA, alleging non-compliance and proposing the above consequences, in accordance with the Code. RUSADA will have 21 days to accept the notice. If RUSADA does not accept it, the matter will be referred to CAS. If CAS imposes the proposed consequences, they will be binding and must be recognized and enforced by all Signatories.


22/11/19 WADA’S COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS NON-COMPLIANCE FOR RUSADA

Montreal, 22 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that, today, WADA sent a recommendation of its independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) regarding the ongoing compliance procedure brought against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA). 

The detailed, confidential, document — which will be discussed by the ExCo at its meeting on 9 December in Paris, France — recommends that notice be sent to RUSADA asserting non-compliance with a Critical requirement of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS); proposing serious consequences in line with the principles set out in the ISCCS; and, proposing reinstatement conditions.

The CRC recommendation was based on reports by WADA Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) and independent forensic experts, which were considered by the CRC during their meeting of 17 November, regarding a number of inconsistencies found in some of the data that was retrieved by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. WADA I&I’s subsequent assessment included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions, including follow-up questions, raised by WADA I&I and the forensic experts.

These questions gave RUSADA and the Russian Ministry of Sport an opportunity to explain the inconsistencies, as part of WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA.

WADA continues to pursue this matter robustly and as quickly as practicable, while ensuring that due process is respected, as outlined in the ISCCS.

Meanwhile, as previously outlined, the 40+ cases that were sent by WADA in July to a number of International Federations for action were based on data that were unaffected by these inconsistencies. Accordingly, those cases can proceed without delay, and more such cases will follow in due course.


20/11/19 WADA SUSPENDS ACCREDITATION OF BANGKOK LABORATORY

Montreal, 20 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of the National Doping Control Centre in Bangkok, Thailand (the Laboratory), for a period of up to six months.

This suspension has been imposed on the Laboratory due to non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) as identified during a WADA site visit and subsequent follow-up of its routine activities.

In September 2019, WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) recommended the initiation of disciplinary proceedings against the Laboratory, which were subsequently carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee that was mandated to make a recommendation to the Chair of the WADA Executive Committee regarding the status of the Laboratory’s accreditation. This process is now complete.

The suspension, which took effect on 18 November 2019, prohibits the Laboratory from carrying out any anti-doping activities, including all analyses of urine and blood samples. During the period of suspension, relevant samples must be securely transported to another WADA-accredited laboratory for analysis, in accordance with the guidance provided in the ISL. This is in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis, which also helps preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

Pursuant to Article 13.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the Laboratory may appeal this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days of receipt of notice.

During the period of suspension, the Laboratory shall address all non-conformities identified by WADA in any request for corrective action or otherwise, as well as any additional non-conformities identified during any follow-up WADA site visit during the suspension period. If the Laboratory satisfies WADA in meeting these requirements, it may apply for reinstatement prior to the expiry of the six-month suspension period. Should the Laboratory not address the non-conformities by the end of the six-month suspension period, WADA may extend the suspension of the Laboratory’s accreditation for up to an additional six months.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


18/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES NEW AND REVISED
TECHNICAL LETTERS

Montreal, 18 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces the publication of the following Technical Letters, which were approved by the Agency’s Executive Committee on 4 November 2019 and are required to be implemented with immediate effect by all WADA-accredited laboratories:

TL21: in situ formation of 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione (6-oxo) and metabolites (new)
This new Technical Letter includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of findings for 6-oxo and metabolites, which may result in urine samples from the in-situ transformation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

TL08: Use of Internal Standards (revised)
This revised version of TL08 reintroduces an explanatory sentence at the beginning of Section 3 – Additional Recommendation for Qualitative Confirmation Procedures. However, since the technical content has not changed from TL01/2017 (version 2.0), the effective date remains the same as said version.

TL19: Prednisone and Prednisolone (revised)
This revised version of TL19 rectifies a typographical error in the second paragraph (page 1), and now properly refers to TL10 instead of TL09.

About Technical Letters

WADA publishes Technical Letters on an ad-hoc basis in order to provide instruction and guidance to WADA-accredited laboratories, WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport and other stakeholders on particular issues related to the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures. Technical Letters are modified and/or withdrawn by WADA as deemed appropriate.

The Technical Letters constitute a WADA laboratory standard document which supersedes any previous publication on a similar topic and becomes an integral part of the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL).

A Technical Letter shall be applied to samples which are received by the Laboratory on and after the Technical Letter’s effective date.

Should you have any questions regarding the above Technical Letters, we kindly invite you to contact WADA’s Science Department at science@wada-ama.org. Should you wish to consult previously issued Technical Letters, they are available and indexed on WADA’s website.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


18/11/19 WADA UPDATE REGARDING RUSADA
CODE COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 18 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) confirms that WADA’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) met yesterday, 17 November, to consider a report from the Agency’s Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) and independent forensic experts and, accordingly, to discuss the ongoing compliance procedure brought against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

In line with the process, the CRC will now bring a formal recommendation to the WADA Executive Committee (ExCo), under the chairmanship of WADA President Sir Craig Reedie whose term of office runs until 31 December 2019. The ExCo is scheduled to meet on 9 December to discuss the recommendation.

The WADA I&I report was based on its assessment of a number of inconsistencies found in some of the data that was retrieved by WADA from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. This assessment included consideration of responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions, including follow-up questions, raised by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts.

These questions gave RUSADA and the Russian Ministry of Sport an opportunity to explain the inconsistencies, as part of WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA.

WADA continues to pursue this matter robustly and as quickly as practicable, while ensuring that due process is respected, as outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.

Meanwhile, as previously outlined, the 47 cases that were sent by WADA in July to a number of International Federations for action were based on data that were unaffected by these inconsistencies. Accordingly, those cases can proceed without delay, and more such cases will follow in due course.


13/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES VIDEOS CELEBRATING ITS 20TH ANNIVERSARY

Montreal, 13 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish a video celebrating its 20th anniversary leading a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport, which was premiered during the Agency’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport in Katowice, Poland from 5-7 November. The video features a number of WADA’s external and internal stakeholders speaking of how WADA came about, its leaders, its progress and its challenges.
 
The Agency also wishes to share two other videos, which feature athletes and other stakeholders wishing WADA a happy 20th anniversary:

  1. Athletes
  2. Other stakeholders

Addressing the over 1,500 World Conference participants last week, WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “It is remarkable to think of how far WADA and, by extension, the global anti-doping program has come over these two decades. With the energy of everyone – athletes, governments, sports, laboratories, National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, and all those interested in the integrity of sport – I have no doubt that WADA will continue to be at the forefront of protecting clean sport for the next 20 years and far beyond.”
 
The anti-doping movement, as we know it today, was the result of crises in sport; in particular, the Festina cycling scandal back in 1998. At the time, there was no one answer to tackling doping. Every sport had different rules and countries had different laws so an athlete could, for example, be banned in one country or sport but be able to compete in others. Accordingly, doping started to be seen as the most serious threat to the values of sport.
 
In February 1999, the first World Conference on Doping in Sport brought together all parties involved in Lausanne; and, resulted in the Lausanne Declaration on Doping in Sport. This document provided for the creation of an independent international anti-doping agency to be operational for the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia.
 
Pursuant to the terms of the Lausanne Declaration, WADA was established on 10 November 1999 to promote and coordinate the fight against doping in sport internationally; and, started operating later that year as a unique 50-50 partnership between the Sports Movement and Governments of the world.
 
What followed quickly was the coming into force of the first version of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) in 2004, which is the fundamental and universal document upon which the World Anti-Doping Program is based. It harmonizes anti-doping policies, rules and regulations within sport organizations and among public authorities around the globe. The Code works in conjunction with International Standards that aim to foster consistency among anti-doping organizations in areas such as: testing; laboratories; Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs); the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods; the protection of privacy and personal information; Code Compliance by Signatories; and, effective January 2021, results management; and, education.  
 
In parallel, in 2005, the UNESCO Convention Against Doping in Sport was adopted, which is the practical instrument by which governments formalize their commitment to the fight against doping. It allows governments to align their domestic policies with the Code, thus harmonizing the rules governing anti-doping in sport and public legislation. The Convention is now ratified by 188 countries, covering around 99% of the world’s population.
 
Last week’s World Conference concluded with WADA’s Foundation Board approving the fourth version of the Code and the Agency’s Executive Committee approving the International Standards. All these documents will come into force on 1 January 2021.


13/11/19 WADA PUBLISHES TECHNICAL DOCUMENT FOR LABORATORY DOCUMENTATION PACKAGES

Montreal, 13 November 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces the publication of the Technical Document for Laboratory Documentation Packages (TD2019LDOC), which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee on 4 November 2019; and, is required to be implemented by all WADA-accredited laboratories with immediate effect.

The revised TD2019LDOC replaces the former TD2017LDOC (version 2) and includes clarification on the quality control samples required for Documentation Packages in Appendix E: Blood Athlete Biological Passport (ABP). In addition, some definitions have been updated for consistency with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) version 10.0.

Should you have any questions regarding the above Technical Document, we kindly invite you to contact WADA’s Science Department at science@wada-ama.org. Should you wish to consult previously issued Technical Documents, they are available and indexed on WADA’s website.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


7/11/19 WADA’S WORLD CONFERENCE ‘DECLARATION’ CALLS ON ALL STAKEHOLDERS TO UNITE AGAINST DOPING

Katowice, 7 November 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport concluded today in Katowice, Poland with WADA’s Foundation Board approving the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and the Executive Committee (ExCo) approving the International Standards. All these documents will come into force on 1 January 2021.

Katowice Declaration

Following these approvals, a ‘Katowice Declaration’ called upon “all stakeholders in the fight against doping in sport, including the Sports Movement, Governments, Anti-Doping Organizations and athletes to reinforce their efforts to strengthen their cooperation in every possible way; to present a unified front to strive to eradicate doping in sport; to increase resources dedicated to protecting clean sport; and to bring all perpetrators to account, without limitation.”

In December 2017, WADA initiated a transparent revision process which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code; two for the related International Standards and one for the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act, previously known as the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to further strengthen the global anti-doping program.

The Board congratulated Beckie Scott, the Chair of WADA’s Athlete Committee, and WADA Athlete Committee member Ben Sandford, the document’s lead drafter, along with the other members of the Committee on the approval of the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act by the ExCo the day prior. The Board acknowledged a two-and-a-half-year effort by the Committee, which involved consultation with thousands of athletes and stakeholders around the world. The purpose of the Act, which is based on the 2021 Code and Standards, is to ensure that athlete rights within anti-doping are clearly set out, accessible, and universally applicable.

Election of WADA President and Vice-President

The Board elected former elite runner and Poland’s Minister for Sport and Tourism, Witold Bańka, as the next WADA President and double Olympic gold-medalist in short-track speed skating, Yang Yang, as Vice-President – an election that will place athletes in the top two leadership roles in WADA when they officially take office on 1 January 2020.

After the election, Witold Bańka said: “It is a huge honor for me to become President of WADA. I know how important the Agency is for the future of sport and I will work hard to ensure that it continues to lead a global anti-doping program that holds up the values of clean sport at all times. I pledge my commitment to putting the athletes’ interests first so they can have confidence that WADA will always support them to compete clean. Whatever happens, I will always come back to that. I know we will face many challenges in the years ahead. We have a difficult task before us and we will sometimes have to make difficult decisions. Yet, I am convinced we will be able to make them. Together, we will work tirelessly to make the sports world cleaner and safer and something that continues to inspire millions of people around the world.”

Yang Yang said: “I am very honored to be elected to this important position. As a former athlete, I have a strong passion for sport and I truly believe in the fight against doping and the need to protect the rights of clean athletes. Together with Minister Bańka I am very confident that we can make a real difference and I am looking forward to starting this work, so that there can be a bright future for sport.”

Today was also an opportunity for the anti-doping movement to recognize the contributions of outgoing President Sir Craig Reedie; as well as, a number of other Executive Committee and Foundation Board members and Standing Committee Chairs that will step down at the end of this year. Like most sporting bodies, WADA’s talented and dedicated volunteers are the backbone of the Agency. Without their engagement, the Agency and Clean Sport would simply not advance.

Founding President, Richard Pound, who led WADA from its inception in 1999 until 2007, was one of many colleagues that paid tribute to Sir Craig as he prepares to leave office. Richard Pound said: “Sir Craig is someone who has given up his time and experience voluntarily over many years. He has led WADA for six years and at the end of Craig’s tenure, WADA is a better organization than it was when he took office. We have a stronger regulatory framework, a world-class intelligence and investigations operation, we are funding scientific research and development and we have a significantly increased budget. Craig should take satisfaction that he leaves a stronger WADA than he inherited and I think we should all thank him for that.”

Sir Craig, who will step down as President at the end of 2019, said: “I have been involved with WADA since the start 20 years ago and I have seen it grow into the highly effective organization that it is today. It has been my privilege to lead the Agency for the past six years, through what have been challenging times. In that time, I have seen WADA grow and strengthen considerably. I wish Minister Bańka and Yang Yang every success as they take over the reins. It is a telling sign that both the new President and Vice-President are former elite athletes who no doubt will bring athletes’ voices and perspectives forward.”

The Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act

During the Board, WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, responded to Board members’ questions regarding WADA Management’s position on the Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act, which is currently making its way through the United States Congress. Olivier Niggli clarified that WADA Management broadly welcomed the Act as it did with other Governmental efforts to pass legislation that strengthens anti-doping. He added that more than half the members of the Board, representing both the Sports Movement and Governments, had previously expressed reservations with the extra-territoriality aspect of the Act and had instructed WADA Management to seek clarification on any possible unintended consequences it may bring from the relevant Government officials in Washington D.C. He undertook to continue updating the Board so that members could be kept up to date on developments.

RUSADA Compliance Procedure

As he did at the 4 November ExCo meeting, the Chair of the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC), Jonathan Taylor, updated the meeting on the latest progress being made as regards the compliance procedure taken against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) in relation to inconsistencies WADA detected in the data collected from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. Jonathan Taylor confirmed that a CRC meeting to discuss the experts report was scheduled for 17 November. Should the CRC issue a recommendation, the ExCo will meet as soon thereafter as practicable to consider the recommendation.

WADA Governance

In a significant step forward in the ongoing process of strengthening WADA’s governance structure, the Board adopted the first set of legal documents which will enable implementation of a good portion of the governance reforms agreed by the Board in November 2018. At the May 2020 Board meeting, a small expert group will be proposed to monitor the effective implementation of these reforms and to formulate proposals for future reforms to ensure WADA governance remains fit for purpose.

2020 Budget

The Board approved the WADA budget for 2020, which will be USD 37,444,738, representing an 8% increase compared to 2019.

About the World Conference

The World Conference, which ran from 5-7 November, took stock of the evolution of Clean Sport with stakeholders engaging in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program. It brought together more than 1,500 representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media.


6/11/19 WADA’S WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT FOCUSES ON STRENGTHENED RULES’ BENEFITS TO ATHLETES

Katowice, 6 November 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) World Conference on Doping in Sport – being held from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland – primarily focused on the International Standards of the global anti-doping program, which will be put before WADA’s Executive Committee tomorrow for approval. A Conference session was devoted to each Standard with experts on hand to explain some of the technicalities of each and the positive impact that they will have on clean sport.

The comprehensive suite of Standards – which includes two new ones related to results management and education – covers the topics of testing and investigations, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, the Prohibited List, laboratories, data protection, and Signatory compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code). Once approved, all the Standards will enter into force on 1 January 2021, with the exception of the List that is updated annually.

In December 2017, WADA initiated a very transparent revision process which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code and two for the related International Standards. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to strengthen the global anti-doping rules.

The new International Standard for Results Management seeks to make cases of suspected doping more harmonized, fair, efficient and timely so that athletes are treated the same regardless of their sport or country, while the International Standard for Education will further enable Signatories to consider those in their sporting landscape who would benefit from education, plan how to reach them, provide education opportunities for them to access and then gather feedback for improvements.

WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “In conjunction with the Code, the International Standards underpin the entire global anti-doping program and have proven over time to be highly effective. In order for them to remain robust, they need to evolve and adapt to the changing landscape. Through the comprehensive consultation process that has led up to this point, we received a huge number of comments and contributions from stakeholders, the result of which is stronger regulations that will protect athletes and clean sport further.”

During the afternoon, WADA Athlete Committee Chair Beckie Scott and member Ben Sandford presented the latest draft of the Athletes’ Anti-Doping Rights Act – previously known as the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights. The purpose of this document is to ensure that athlete rights within anti-doping are clearly set out, accessible, and universally applicable. Beckie Scott and Ben Sandford took Conference participants through the Act’s two-year evolution, detailed its contents and addressed questions and comments raised by the Conference participants. The Act will be considered along with the International Standards by WADA’s Executive Committee tomorrow.

Another athlete-focused highlight of the day was a session that featured the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC’s) ‘Take the Podium’ program, which is a medal reallocation program launched in 2018 upon the recommendation of the IOC’s Athlete Commission. Many athletes have had medals taken away from them in the years following an Olympic Games or other major events after re-analysis of stored doping control samples by the IOC and other anti-doping organizations revealed the presence of prohibited substances or methods thanks to new or improved detection methods. The IOC has implemented a program that looks to give those athletes who were cheated out of medals at Olympic Games, their moment of glory and recognition.

Moderated by Danka Bartekova, Vice President of the IOC Athlete Commission and a member of WADA’s Athlete Committee and Executive Committee, the session focused on British javelin thrower Goldie Sayers and Polish hammer thrower Anita Wlodarczyk – both who joined Danka Bartekova on the stage to share their experience with the representatives of the anti-doping community gathered in Katowice.

Sir Craig Reedie said: “Individual cases like Goldie’s and Anita’s inspire us. This Conference is mostly discussing the rules – the Code and the Standards. Those debates can seem a little abstract or even dull at times but it is wonderful when those rules that have extended the statute of limitations to ten years and enabled re-analysis programs, make a meaningful positive difference in the lives of athletes. That is why we are here – to serve them. It sends a clear message that we will not stop seeking justice for those who have been cheated and that we will always stand beside the athletes who choose to compete clean.”

At the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, Goldie Sayers was denied a bronze medal by an athlete who was subsequently shown to have doped. Eleven years later, she received her rightful prize from Sir Craig Reedie, in front of her home crowd at an international athletics event in London.

Sayers said: “Sport has definitely shaped me as a person. It has taught me that you can achieve a lot more than you can imagine. When I was being presented with the medal in London, I stood at the back of the podium and said to myself ‘just take it all in, take it all in’, and then I got really, really emotional. Receiving my medal the way I did was, of course, not how I dreamed it would be but it is important that athletes receive justice, no matter how long that takes.

“It’s a great privilege to give an athlete’s perspective on the medal re-allocation process and what it means to have justice finally served. The retesting program is an important aspect of anti-doping and I want to thank all those dedicated people who work hard for clean sport, people who made it possible for this to happen.”

Speaking directly to the audience, she added: “Sometimes in anti-doping you feel it’s a bit of an uphill battle, that nobody is grateful. But cases like mine show that it is worth it and I know that athletes really do value the anti-doping movement. You are all incredibly important and we need you. Please keep on fighting the fight.”

In London 2012, Anita Wlodarczyk came second behind an athlete who was later disqualified as part of the IOC re-analysis program. Two weeks ago, at a special ceremony at the Grand Theatre in Warsaw, she received her gold medal from IOC President Thomas Bach.

Wlodarczyk said: “At the time, in 2012, when I came second at the London Olympics, I was very happy because my biggest dream was to win an Olympic medal. I remember every detail of the ceremony and I was very proud to win a medal for Poland. But five years later, I received the news that the athlete who came first was caught for doping through re-analysis. The IOC informed me of the official decision and asked me where and when I would like to receive the gold medal.

“It was such a thrill and I was very happy to receive the medal here in Poland during a special gala celebration of the centenary of the Polish Olympic Committee. It meant a lot to me. I am very happy to have two gold Olympic medals now. Ultimately, it is the clean athletes who are cheated when other athletes take performance-enhancing drugs. I heard here at the World Conference about new methods of doping control and I am very happy that WADA is helping to protect athletes and always looking to improve the system.”

The World Conference is taking stock of the evolution of Clean Sport with stakeholders engaging in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program. It has brought together more than 1,500 representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media.


5/11/19 CLEAN SPORT COMMUNITY EXPRESSES SUPPORT FOR 2021 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE ON FIRST DAY OF WADA’S FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Katowice, 5 November 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport opened in Katowice, Poland; which, from 5-7 November, is taking stock of the evolution of Clean Sport and engaging in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program.

Organized with the generous support of the Ministry of Sport and Tourism of Poland, the Conference has brought together over 1,500 representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media.

Coinciding with WADA’s 20th anniversary, the World Conference opened with a speech by WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, which was followed by speeches from the President of Poland, Andrzej Duda; the President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), Thomas Bach; the Minister of Sport and Tourism and incoming WADA President, Witold Bańka; the Chair of WADA’s ‘One Voice’ group of public authorities, Marcos Diaz; the Assistant Director-General for Social and Human Sciences at UNESCO, Nada Al-Nashif; and the Mayor of Katowice, Marcin Krupa.

The day focused on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code), which is set to be approved by WADA’s Foundation Board on 7 November and to enter into force on 1 January 2021. In December 2017, WADA initiated a very transparent revision process which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code and two for the related International Standards. During this time, stakeholders had multiple opportunities to contribute and make recommendations on how to strengthen the global anti-doping rules.

WADA stakeholders had the opportunity to intervene publicly on the current status of anti-doping and on the revised Code during the afternoon sessions. During these sessions, more than 30 Conference delegates from various categories of stakeholders offered their views. Most praised the latest draft version of the revised Code, highlighting its benefits for both athletes and anti-doping organizations worldwide, while also suggesting ways of how the anti-doping system could be further enhanced. There was strong recognition for 20 years of achievement by WADA, of challenges, but also of the need to further strengthen the Agency and the global anti-doping program for the benefit of clean athletes. More stakeholder interventions will follow tomorrow.

During his address, WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “WADA is maintaining the Code as a living document that adapts to the changing anti-doping landscape to ensure it remains fit for purpose. This third Code review in the Agency’s 20-year history has harnessed the practical experience of WADA and its stakeholders in order to strengthen the global harmonized fight against doping in sport.

“On 10 November, WADA will celebrate its 20th anniversary. It has been two decades of progress, improvement and, of course, plenty of complex challenges. It is remarkable to think of how far WADA and, by extension, the global anti-doping program has come. However, this is no time to be resting on our laurels as there will always be those who try to destabilize the anti-doping system. The key for WADA is to continue listening, learning and implementing ever more effective strategies and processes in collaboration with all our partners.”

In his speech, the IOC President commended the Agency and Sir Craig for the strides made in the anti-doping system. He pledged an additional IOC contribution to anti-doping of up to USD 10 million. These funds, he explained, would include: USD 5 million to finance long-term (up to 10-year) storage of the thousands of samples collected by anti-doping organizations during the pre-Olympic Games testing periods for later re-analysis, bringing that process into line with samples collected during the Games themselves; USD 2.5 million towards WADA’s science budget to build on the success of the ongoing research program, provided Governments of the world match that amount; and another USD 2.5 million to a joint program, with Governments, to further strengthen the successful work of WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department.

Having made this announcement, Thomas Bach said: “I invite all of you here today to join hands so that together we can accomplish the mission of WADA and together we can send a strong signal from Katowice to the athletes of the world, and to the general public – a signal of determination, a signal of cooperation, a signal of credibility.”

President Duda told the Conference: “Thanks to WADA’s work, I think more and more young people are staying away from doping. We must do all we can to ensure they are guided by honesty and integrity, reaching their goals with a clear conscience, with their heads held high and so that they never have to be ashamed because of what they did.”

The incoming WADA President, Witold Bańka, who is up for election by the Foundation Board (Board) on 7 November, spoke passionately about WADA and what clean sport means to him. “Sport is a beautiful idea that has the power to unite people no matter what their political views, religion, skin color or age. This idea must be protected. We have to prevent corrupting it. We must do everything we can to save this idea.”

Minister Banka mentioned funding as being a key element of ensuring WADA continues to move forward with the anti-doping program. He said: “I call upon global sports leaders and those who represent Governments, as well as private companies, that if they want sport to be clean, they need to increase their financial support for the fight against doping in sport. WADA needs you and your support, just like you need WADA.”

Picking up on some of the themes highlighted in his opening address, WADA’s President participated in the morning panel session two, which reflected on the 20-year history of the Agency while exploring perspectives on the direction and objectives of the future of anti-doping. The panel also included Munashe Dangare (a field hockey player from Zimbabwe), WADA Vice-President Linda Helleland, past Presidents Richard Pound (1999-2007) and John Fahey (2008-2013), and incoming President and Vice-President, Witold Bańka and Yang Yang.

The third session of the day explored a vision of the anti-doping community for the future and featured Arly Velasquez (Paralympic skier from Mexico), Yaya Yamamoto (Japan Anti-Doping Agency), Franz Schwarzenbacher (Criminal Intelligence Service of Austria), Christine Mugera (Africa Zone V Regional Anti-Doping Organization), Dr Peter Van Eenoo (Laboratory Director at the University of Ghent, Belgium) and Brett Clothier (Athletics Integrity Unit).

As outlined in the Conference program, the Conference will wrap up on 7 November with the Code being presented for approval by WADA’s Board and the International Standards being presented for endorsement by the Agency’s Executive Committee.

On the same day, the Board will elect WADA’s new President and Vice President. Minister Banka, who is also a former elite 400m runner is the candidate for President; and, China’s double Olympic gold-medal winning short-track speed skater, Yang Yang, is the Vice-Presidential candidate. Once elected, they will assume their roles on 1 January 2020.


4/11/19 WADA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TAKES A NUMBER OF DECISIONS AHEAD OF FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Katowice, 4 November 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Executive Committee (ExCo) met in Katowice, Poland. The 12-member ExCo is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and is composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments of the world.
 
The half-day meeting, which took place on the eve of WADA’s fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport (5-7 November), focused on a number of decisions and recommendations to the Foundation Board, which will meet on 7 November, concerning a range of topics. The main decisions are outlined in the summary below.
 
Reflecting on the day’s events, WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, said: “This week is an important one for WADA and the broader anti-doping community, and I am pleased with the discussions that the ExCo had on a number of key matters. As we head into the start of the World Conference tomorrow, it is clear that everyone is focused on ensuring significant outcomes that will strengthen the global anti-doping program in the interest of athletes worldwide.”

RUSADA Code Compliance
 
The ExCo heard an update from the Chair of the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC), Jonathan Taylor, on the compliance procedure currently underway against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA). WADA initiated the procedure following identification by the Agency’s Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) Department and by independent forensic experts of inconsistencies in the data retrieved by WADA I&I from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019.
 
As per WADA’s update of 28 October, the matter is being dealt with robustly and as quickly as practicable. Once the experts conclude their assessment, a report will be sent to the CRC to consider. Should the CRC make a recommendation regarding RUSADA’s compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), it will be sent to the ExCo for decision at a meeting to be held as soon as possible, in line with the process laid out in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.
 
Separately, an initial batch of 47 evidentiary packages, based on data unaffected by the inconsistencies, have been sent to the relevant international federations for them to bring cases forward. Concurrently, WADA I&I continues to build more evidentiary packages.
 
Social Science Research
 
The ExCo approved the recommendation of WADA’s Education Committee to fund eight social science research project grants totaling USD 332,841 under the 2020 Social Science Research Grant Program. The details of the newly approved projects will be made available under the Social Science Research section of WADA’s website in due course.

International Standard for Testing and Investigations
 
The ExCo approved amendments to the International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI), specifically related to the requirement for urine samples to meet a suitable specific gravity for analysis. The minimum volume of urine required for analysis will remain at 90ml but if an athlete can provide 150ml or more of urine, the minimum specific gravity measurement (using a refractometer) will be lowered to 1:003 or above instead of the current 1:005. The minimum 1:005 specific gravity requirement will remain in place for samples with a volume greater than 90ml but less than 150ml.
 
These changes, which were endorsed by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group, recognize significant enhancements in the sensitivity of laboratory analytical methods made over the past 20 years and will reduce the amount of time some athletes will have to spend in doping control stations, making the process more athlete-friendly while also presenting a saving in resources for anti-doping organizations.
 
The revised ISTI will be published shortly and the amendments will take effect on 1 March 2020. This is an exceptional approval, in advance of other changes to the Standard that will come into force on 1 January 2021, meaning these changes can be utilized during the Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo and during most of 2020.
 
Health, Medical and Research
 
The ExCo approved an application for candidate status from the Laboratorio Clinico Genetix located in Panama City, Panama, to become a laboratory approved for Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) analysis. The laboratory’s application for ABP-approved status will now go forward to the WADA Laboratory Expert Group that will evaluate whether its technical and analytical capabilities justify approval.
 
In addition, the ExCo gave approval to the following six WADA-accredited laboratories to manage Athlete Passport Management Units (APMUs):

  1. Beijing, China
  2. Doha, Qatar
  3. London, United Kingdom
  4. Montreal, Canada
  5. Rome, Italy
  6. Salt Lake City, USA

The APMU status, which confirms that these laboratories fulfill a number of quality and independence criteria, will allow the laboratories in question to drive essential anti-doping activities in relation to the ABP program. These six laboratories join the ten approved as APMUs by the ExCo at its 23 September meeting in Tokyo. 
 
World Conference
 
The three-day World Conference begins tomorrow with a packed program, filled with expert speakers from all aspects of the global anti-doping community, including athletes, scientists, investigators, lawyers, administrators, government officials and educators.
 
As outlined in the Conference program, this fifth World Conference will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards) that were subject of a two-year review process; and which, will be presented for discussion by stakeholders during the Conference. The week will wrap up on 7 November with the Code being presented for endorsement by WADA’s Foundation Board (Board) and the Standards being presented for endorsement by the ExCo.
 
On the same day, the Board will elect a new President and Vice-President, who will assume their roles on 1 January 2020. The candidate for President to replace Sir Craig Reedie is Poland’s Minister of Sport and Tourism and former elite 400m runner, Witold Bańka, while China’s double Olympic gold-medal winning short-track speed skater, Yang Yang, is the Vice-Presidential candidate to replace Linda Helleland of Norway.
 
As part of the week’s activities, attendees will be marking the 20th anniversary of WADA’s formation by recalling some of the Agency’s main achievements in its short history; and, identifying some of the main challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.


1/11/19 WADA WELCOMES CLEAN SPORT COMMUNITY IN POLAND FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 1 November 2019 – From 5-7 November, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) will welcome more than 1,500 representatives from the clean sport community to Katowice, Poland, for its fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, which coincides with the 20th anniversary of the Agency’s formation.

Organized with the generous support of the Ministry of Sport and Tourism of the Republic of Poland, the Conference will convene representatives from the sports movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media to take stock of the evolution of clean sport and engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program.

As outlined in the Conference program, this year’s World Conference will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards) that were subject of a two-year review process, and which will be presented for discussion by stakeholders during the Conference. The week will wrap up on 7 November with the Code being presented for endorsement by WADA’s Foundation Board (Board) and the Standards being presented for endorsement by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo).

On the same day, the Board will elect a new President and Vice-President, who will assume their roles on 1 January 2020. The candidate for President to replace Sir Craig Reedie is Poland’s Minister of Sport and Tourism and former elite 400m runner, Witold Bańka, while China’s double Olympic gold-medal winning short-track speed skater, Yang Yang, is the Vice-Presidential candidate to replace Linda Helleland of Norway.

Looking ahead to his final set of meetings as President, Sir Craig Reedie couldn’t help but reflect on 20 years of challenge, adjustment and growth for WADA.  

He said: “WADA was formed as a response to a widespread doping crisis and it has been at the forefront of protecting clean sport for two decades. Since the Agency’s formation, we have made huge strides in tackling the scourge of doping in sport and we continue to move forward positively on a range of fronts.

“It has been two decades of progress in the face of complex challenges. Founded in November 1999, WADA quickly collaborated with stakeholders and delivered the first edition of the Code in 2003 during the Second World Conference on Doping in Sport in Copenhagen. This was the first time in history that anti-doping rules were harmonized across sports and countries. International Standards were added in such key areas as the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, testing and investigations, accredited laboratories, data protection, and compliance.

“In parallel, WADA worked with the United Nations to help develop the UNESCO Convention Against Doping in Sport that provides public authorities with a legal framework through which they can address specific areas of doping that are outside the domain of the sports movement. The Convention was written in record time in 2005 and is now ratified by 188 countries, covering around 99% of the world’s population.

“At the time, WADA committed to ensuring that the Code would be a living document, subject to periodic review. In keeping with that commitment, the Board initiated two other stakeholder review processes that led to the 2009 and 2015 Codes. The purpose of revising the Code and Standards is to leverage WADA’s and stakeholders’ experience garnered through years of practical implementation in order to strengthen the global harmonized fight against doping in sport.

“Next week in Katowice, we gather together as a community to take stock of how far we have come, assess the current landscape and look ahead to shape the future of anti-doping in sport through the approval of the 2021 Code and Standards. Over the past 20 years — as a movement that includes athletes, governments, sports, laboratories, anti-doping organizations and others that are interested in clean sport — we have faced many challenges. This did not prevent us from making significant strides. We have come this far together and there is a lot more to do to ensure athletes can compete in a doping-free environment in all sports and all countries. Clearly, there will be more challenges ahead; and so, now more than ever, it is vitally important that we move the right way together for the benefit of athletes worldwide.”

The World Conference will include an impressive line-up of speakers and presenters, which includes athletes, lawyers, scientists, anti-doping experts, journalists, government officials and others as a range of topics will be discussed as part of the official program.


30/10/19 WADA STRESSES IMPORTANCE OF EDUCATION DURING SEVENTH UNESCO CONFERENCE OF PARTIES

Paris, 30 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) incoming President, Witold Banka, and WADA’s Director General, Olivier Niggli [pictured], were in Paris, France, this week to take part in the seventh UNESCO Conference of Parties (Conference) that is being held from 29-31 October. The Conference, which is a statutory session that takes place on a bi-annual basis, addresses issues regarding the implementation of the International Convention against Doping in Sport (the Convention) and other anti-doping matters.

The Convention, which was adopted in 2005, is the legal instrument through which Governments formalize their commitment to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code). With 188 States that have endorsed it, representing more than 99% of the global population, the Convention is the second most successful in UNESCO history in terms of the extent of ratification post-adoption.

Education, expanding the global legislative framework and strengthening the anti-doping movement’s ties with law enforcement agencies around the world will be key ways in which the battle to protect clean sport will succeed, said Witold Banka in his speech.

“More and more, education is being identified as a priority in the protection of clean sport. The children of today will be the athletes, coaches, parents, teachers, doctors, anti-doping practitioners and Government ministers of tomorrow. We must expose them now to the values that will positively shape sport in the decades ahead. This is the foundation, not only for ethical sporting behavior but also for character development and good citizenship. We have a duty to help our young people learn this through values-based education programs,” he said.

“For me, it’s all about preserving, promoting and protecting. Together we can work to preserve the spirit of sport; to promote the values of clean sport that we are all so passionate about; and ultimately, we will protect the athletes and citizens we serve.”

“WADA is often asked if we support the introduction of legislation to combat doping in sport. For sure, the cooperation between Governments and sports bodies can be improved further and WADA favors governments using their legislative powers to protect clean athletes in the fight against doping. We particularly welcome legislative measures to facilitate the sharing of information between Anti-Doping Organizations and law enforcement agencies in areas of mutual interest and also when it comes to the protection of whistleblowers. We have seen the benefits of this policy recently with a number of successful investigations involving WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations team.”

On day two of the Conference, under the theme ‘The Right Way Together’, Olivier Niggli took delegates through some of WADA’s strategic priorities, in particular the development and implementation of the 2021 Code and associated International Standards, which will be discussed at WADA’s World Conference on Doping in Sport to be held from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland. He also addressed areas such as compliance monitoring, capacity building, education, intelligence and investigations, and ongoing management of the Russian doping issue.

In closing, WADA’s Director General made an appeal to States Parties that they make every effort to comply with the UNESCO Convention. He said: “While Governments are not Signatories to the Code, it is important that they meet the expectations of them set out in the Code or face meaningful consequences – just like athletes and Code Signatories do when they fall short of expectations.”

“Beyond this, Governments can certainly help curb the use of doping substances by strengthening the capacity of Anti-Doping Organizations, building awareness and offering more education and testing. They can also help curb the distribution of doping substances by strengthening legislation to allow for the sharing of information between law enforcement agencies and Anti-Doping Organizations, encouraging and protecting whistleblowers, and monitoring the distribution across borders.”

About the Conference of Parties

The Conference of Parties has overall responsibility for implementation of the Convention. Its objectives include:Monitoring compliance with the Convention;Examining and adopting amendments to the Convention; andDetermining how resources of the Fund for the Elimination of Doping in Sport will be used.In addition to States Parties and other Member States of UNESCO, WADA is invited as an advisory organization to the Conference. The International Olympic Committee, the International Paralympic Committee, the Council of Europe, the Intergovernmental Committee for Physical Education and Sport, and other intergovernmental sports organizations are also invited as observers.


30/10/19 WADA AND PARTNERS LAUNCH “SPORT VALUES IN EVERY CLASSROOM” EDUCATION TOOLKIT

Paris, 30 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce the launch of the “Sport Values in Every Classroom” education toolkit, that took place yesterday during the Seventh UNESCO Conference of Parties (COP), which is being held from 29-31 October in Paris, France.

The toolkit, which is a free, cross-curricular resource targeted at teachers of students aged 8-12 years old, was developed in partnership by the following international organizations: WADA; the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); the Agitos Foundation; the International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE); the International Fair Play Committee (IFPC); and, the Olympic Foundation for Cultural Heritage (OFCH). It was based on commissioned research conducted by a team associated with the International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP).

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA is proud to unveil this new education toolkit and would like to thank all the international partners involved in bringing this project to fruition. The development of this global resource for stakeholders truly demonstrates the value of international cooperation. We are pleased to see so many of our partners investing in values-based education.

“Education is a core component of our organization’s mission; and, is clearly mandated in the World Anti-Doping Code as an area in which our Signatories must deliver. This toolkit presents an opportunity for both Governments and Sports to implement values-based education programs, and we look forward to seeing its implementation worldwide.”

The toolkit is intended to complement the existing international curricula by promoting student engagement while helping teachers and other educators instill some of the core values that are synonymous with sport; such as: respect, equity and inclusion, all underpinned by the value of fairness.

The core of the toolkit is a set of 30 Activity Cards that act as complete lesson plans for teachers. These activities can be delivered in the classroom or in the gym, and support teachers in achieving many different curriculum requirements. The activities are engaging and fun even for a classroom setting and have been successfully delivered to children both younger and older than the target age group. The toolkit also includes a Quick Guide and a Teacher’s Companion, which provide academic support to those who seek extra guidance or ideas.

WADA Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “Research has shown that education is a leading strategy in the prevention of doping in sport. I am pleased to see the acknowledgement of a shared agenda between governments and sports in teaching core sports values to students and future athletes through early education.

“This values-based education toolkit is the result of key stakeholders in the international community coming together to provide a solution for a common agenda. For us, this toolkit supports our efforts to take a more balanced and modern approach to anti-doping, where prevention is a main driver and investing in the next generation is critical. We will work with our partners to promote this new education program as it is clear that good values support good citizens and good citizens can become great athletes.”

The toolkit is currently available in English – with more languages to follow soon – and can be downloaded from any of the participating partners’ websites.

For any questions related to the toolkit, please direct your emails to education@wada-ama.org.


28/10/19 WADA REMOVES MAURITIUS NATIONAL ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATION FROM NON-COMPLIANCE LIST

Montreal, 28 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that, following a circular vote of its Executive Committee (ExCo), the Agency removed on 24 October 2019 the Anti-Doping Unit of the Mauritius Ministry of Youth and Sports – the National Anti-Doping Organization of Mauritius – from the list of Signatories that are non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

The Anti-Doping Unit of the Mauritius Ministry of Youth and Sports was declared non-compliant by WADA’s ExCo at its meeting of 16 November 2017 due to non-compliant anti-doping legislation that was being used to enforce the Code. Since then, it has successfully implemented the corrective measures required to address its non-compliance, namely the adoption of legislation and related anti-doping regulations that are in line with the Code.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


28/10/19 WADA UPDATE REGARDING RUSADA
CODE COMPLIANCE

Montreal, 28 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) can confirm it has received further responses from the Russian authorities to a list of detailed and technical questions, including follow-up questions, raised by WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) and the independent forensic experts concerning the data that WADA I&I retrieved from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019.

These questions gave the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) and the Russian Ministry of Sport an opportunity to explain a number of inconsistencies, as part of WADA’s decision on 17 September 2019 to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA.

The responses are currently being assessed by WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts, who will report to the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) in due course so that the CRC is in a position to decide whether to bring a formal recommendation of non-compliance and proposed consequences to the WADA Executive Committee (ExCo).

Given the highly technical nature of this investigation and the volume of complex material being assessed, no fixed timeline can be set at this stage. However, at the moment, it is anticipated that the CRC will be in a position to consider WADA I&I’s report before the end of November. That being the case, the ExCo – under the chairmanship of WADA President Sir Craig Reedie whose term of office runs until 31 December 2019 – would meet as soon as possible thereafter to discuss any CRC recommendation.

WADA continues to pursue this matter robustly and as quickly as practicable, while ensuring that due process is respected, as outlined in the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.


25/10/19 WADA OUTLINES COMPOSITION OF INAUGURAL NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.

In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.


Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.
 
In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

  • Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
  • In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
  • Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.

Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.
 
In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

  • Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
  • In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
  • Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.

Montreal, 25 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to provide further information regarding the composition and mandate of WADA’s inaugural Nominations Committee (Committee), which has been established to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. Formation of the Committee is one of the wide-ranging governance reforms that was approved by WADA’s Foundation Board in November 2018.
 
In terms of composition, in September 2019, the Agency’s Executive Committee (ExCo) approved the following members of the inaugural Committee. The members were identified, recruited, vetted and recommended to the ExCo by Korn Ferry, an external agency that WADA had engaged for this purpose upon approval by the ExCo in May 2019.

The detailed implementation plan for the governance reforms, which was approved by the ExCo in May 2019, outlines the expedited work required of the Committee. Of particular note, the Committee will:

  • Search for a new Compliance Review Committee Chair, and soon start vetting candidates for WADA’s other Standing Committee Chairs, for recommendation to the ExCo in January 2020;
  • In January 2020, provide a report on their skills mapping exercise of the ten stakeholder seats on the ExCo (to be appointed in November 2019) and recommend profiles for the new incoming independent members of the ExCo; and
  • Thereafter, be on standby to vet the candidates for the two new independent members.

Based on the recommendations of WADA’s Governance Working Group, the inaugural Committee will hold office until the first permanent Committee is appointed by the ExCo in May 2020. The inaugural Committee members are eligible to apply to continue should they so wish.

21/10/19 WADA AND FONDS DE RECHERCHE DU QUÉBEC TO FUND THREE PROJECTS RESEARCHING THE USE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR ANTI-DOPING

Montreal, 21 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), in conjunction with the Fonds de recherche du Québec (FRQ), is pleased to announce funding for three projects that will explore the possible uses of artificial intelligence (AI) to advance the global anti-doping program.

Following a call for applications for targeted research on the application and impact of AI in the area of anti-doping, eight proposals were received and, after a period of careful assessment by WADA and FRQ, the successful projects were selected for funding.

WADA Senior Director, Sciences and International Partnerships, Dr Olivier Rabin, said: “AI is an exciting area to be explored and WADA believes there is enormous untapped potential for its use within anti-doping, particularly when it comes to the analysis of big data. In time, we think it could have a hugely positive impact. These three complementary projects will help shed some light on the extent of AI’s potential in the anti-doping context and we are pleased to be able to support what we hope will be important pieces of research.”

Chief Scientist of Québec, Dr. Rémi Quirion, said: “Montreal has become a world leader in the area of artificial intelligence and it is thrilled that WADA has decided to engage closely with the Québec research community in this field. It is hoped through these three projects that we will raise the understanding of the impacts that AI could have on the fight against doping, both technologically and socially. Multi-disciplinary collaborations such as these are ensuring that Québec researchers are at the center of international efforts in this field as they use their expertise to solve complex global problems.”

The first project, led by ‘Dataperformers’, a company that was founded in Montreal in 2013, will be carried out in collaboration with the WADA-accredited laboratory in Paris, known as the Département des analyses de l’Agence française de lutte contre le dopage. The one-year project will explore possible techniques for the analysis and application of AI to detect the use of prohibited substances or methods to circumvent anti-doping rules. If the results are promising, they will be compared with those obtained using traditional statistical methods, such as the adaptive model currently used for the Athlete Biological Passport.

The second project, led by the Montreal-based company ‘Element AI’, aims to quantify the risk of doping in athletes through the application of AI and, as a result, to develop a sampling and testing strategy based on proprietary algorithms. The project will be funded for a period of two years. 

The third project involves members of the ‘Centre for Genomics and Politics’ at McGill University in Montreal, supervised by Prof. Yann Joly. This study will use a qualitative approach to identify the perceptions of different stakeholders regarding the use of AI and its benefits in the context of anti-doping and to guide dialogue between WADA, other anti-doping organizations, athletes and the general public. The project will also be funded for a two-year period.

In May 2018, WADA and the FRQ signed a memorandum of understanding, which will yield CAD 2 million for anti-doping research. Specifically, the two organizations committed to contribute CAD 200,000 every year for five years (2018-22) in order to fund research projects relating to anti-doping, with the possibility of renewing the agreement beyond its initial five-year mandate.

About FRQ:
Reporting to the Minister of Economy, Science and Innovation, the Fonds de recherche du Québec strives to ensure the strategic and coherent development as well as the financial support of Québec research, establish the necessary partnerships to carry out their mission, and promote and support knowledge mobilization.


21/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES INDEPENDENT OBSERVER TEAM REPORT FROM 2019 EUROPEAN GAMES

Montreal, 21 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published its Independent Observer (IO) Team’s Report regarding the anti-doping program at the 2019 European Games held in Minsk, Belarus from 21-30 June 2019.

As it has done at a number of major events since 2000, WADA sent a team to monitor the anti-doping program that was run by the European Olympic Committees (EOC) with the aim of reinforcing confidence in athletes and the public as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of the Games’ anti-doping program.

In addition to collaboration with the EOC and providing general support prior to the Games, the team provided real-time feedback to the EOC designed to optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of the program in compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards.

Led by Hamish Coffey from UK Anti-Doping (UKAD), the four-person team was composed of international experts in anti-doping who observed and provided feedback on all aspects of doping control. This included the implementation of general anti-doping policies and procedures; test distribution planning; implementation of the out-of-competition and in-competition testing programs; athlete selection and notification; Therapeutic Use Exemptions procedures; sample collection procedures; the transport of samples and their chain of custody; and the results management process, including hearings that were held during the IO Team’s presence.

IO Team Chair, Hamish Coffey said: “The anti-doping program implemented at the 2nd European Games was comprehensive, robust and risk-based, and on behalf of the IO Team I would like to commend the EOC and the Minsk European Games Organizing Committee (MEGOC) for their efforts in protecting the rights of clean athletes and protecting the integrity of the event. In this report, the IO Team have highlighted the strengths of the program, as well as recommendations for the EOC to consider for future editions of the Games, as this event continues to grow and evolve. The IO Team extends our thanks to the EOC and MEGOC for their openness and collaboration before, during and after the Games.”

As is the case following all IO Team missions, the report includes a number of recommendations for the EOC and WADA itself – all designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future Games.


18/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES PROPOSED DRAFTS OF THE 2021 WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE AND
INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Montreal, 18 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the following proposed drafts of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) and International Standards (Standards), which will be presented for discussion by stakeholders during the Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, taking place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland; and, presented for endorsement respectively by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) – as relates to the Standards – and Foundation Board (Board) – as relates to the Code – at the conclusion of the Conference on 7 November 2019.

  1. 2021 World Anti-Doping Code
  2. International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS)
  3. International Standard for Laboratories (ISL)
  4. International Standard for the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information (ISPPPI)
  5. International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI)
  6. International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE)
  7. International Standard for Education (ISE) (New)
  8. International Standard for Results Management (ISRM) (New)

In December 2017, WADA initiated the 2021 Code Review Process, which consisted of three distinct consultation phases for the Code and two for the Standards; during which, stakeholders received successive draft revisions; and, their feedback and recommendations were fed back to the eight distinct drafting teams. All successive drafts were published on WADA’s website.

WADA Management is confident that the Review Process, which was reported upon on multiple occasions to WADA’s ExCo and Board, was extensive and transparent – ensuring that all stakeholders had the opportunity to contribute to the practical improvement of the global anti-doping program. For the Code Review alone, the drafting team held 123 meetings and received over 2,000 comments. The Agency is grateful to all the stakeholders for their high-quality feedback; and to the drafting teams that have delivered on this momentous effort that will result in greater protection for Clean Sport.

Legal Opinion regarding the 2021 Code

WADA is also pleased to publish the French version of a Legal Opinion by Judge Jean-Paul Costa, former President of the European Court of Human Rights. Judge Costa rendered his opinion on the 2021 Code, in his capacity as consultant to WADA. His opinion refers to the compatibility of proposed new measures in the Code with international standards relating to human rights and his comments were incorporated within the proposed draft. [The English version will be posted to WADA’s website next week.]

Development and Implementation Guide for Stakeholders

To assist Signatories in their adjustment to, and implementation of, the Code and the Standards, at a later date, WADA will implement a 2021 Code Stakeholder Support Program; and, will work in collaboration with its partners. The aim of the Support Program is to provide simplified guidance for Signatories on what is required by 1 January 2021 when the 2021 Code comes into effect.

In the meantime, we are pleased to provide a Development and Implementation Guide for Stakeholders which touches upon the Support Program and summarizes other matters of importance related to the Review Process; in particular:

  • the significant changes between the current 2015 Code and the proposed Code;
  • the significant changes between the current Standards and the proposed Standards; and
  • a summary of the key topics being addressed in the new Standards.

Should you have any questions in the lead up to the World Conference, please feel free to contact: code@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


15/10/19 WADA DECLARES THE INTERNATIONAL TAEKWON-DO FEDERATION NON-COMPLIANT WITH
WORLD ANTI-DOPING CODE

Montreal, 15 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF) is now officially non-compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

[Please note that ITF is not the World Taekwondo Federation (World Taekwondo), which is the Olympic Federation for the sport of Taekwondo. ITF is a Signatory to the Code but is not recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) or the Global Association of International Sports Federations (GAISF)*.]

As communicated on 23 September 2019, following its meeting in Tokyo, Japan, WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), agreed to follow the recommendation of the Agency’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) to assert ITF as non-compliant with the Code due to ITF’s failure to report to WADA on compliance by completing and submitting its Code Compliance Questionnaire (CCQ).

Under Article 10.3.1 of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS), ITF had 21 days following the date of receipt of the formal notice of non-compliance (23 September 2019) to dispute WADA’s assertion of non-compliance, as well as the proposed consequences and/or the reinstatement conditions proposed by the Agency.

As ITF did not dispute WADA’s assertion of non-compliance, nor the consequences of non-compliance and/or the reinstatement conditions proposed by WADA within 21 days from the date of the formal notice, the assertion of non-compliance is deemed admitted. Furthermore, the consequences of non-compliance and the reinstatement conditions proposed by WADA in the formal notice are deemed accepted, and the formal notice is now a final decision.

As decided by WADA’s ExCo, the consequences applied to the present case in accordance with Article 11 and Annex B.3.1 of the ISCCS are the following:

(a) ITF will lose its WADA Privileges until Reinstatement (see ISCCS Art B.3.1(a)), i.e.: 

  • In accordance with the relevant provisions of WADA’s Statutes, ITF’s Representatives shall be ineligible to hold any WADA office or any position as a member of any WADA board or committee or other body (including but not limited to membership of WADA’s Foundation Board, the Executive Committee, any Standing Committee, and any other committee).
  • ITF shall be ineligible to host any event hosted or organized or co-hosted or co-organized by WADA.
  • ITF’s Representatives shall be ineligible to participate in any WADA Independent Observer Program or WADA Outreach program or other WADA activities.
  • ITF shall not receive any WADA funding (either directly or indirectly) relating to the development of specific activities or participation in specific programs. 

(b) ITF’s Representatives shall be ineligible to sit as members of the boards or committees or other bodies of any Signatory (or its members) or association of Signatories for a period of one year or until ITF is reinstated (whichever is longer) (see ISCCS Art B.3.1 (c)). 

(c) ITF’s Representatives, as well as the Athletes and Athlete Support Personnel participating in its sport (or in one or more disciplines of that sport) will be excluded from participation in or attendance at (…) any multisport Event for the next edition of that Event (summer or winter, where relevant) or until Reinstatement (whichever is longer) (see ISCCS Art B.3.1 (e)).

WADA continues to provide guidance and support to ITF to solve its non-conformity.

Should you have any questions on this matter, please do not hesitate to contact us at compliance@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency 

*There are currently three Code Signatory International Federations for the sport of Taekwon-Do – the World Taekwondo Federation (World Taekwondo) and two other International Federations called “International Taekwon-do Federation”. The non-compliant International Federation is the ITF based in Austria. The two International Federations called “International Taekwon-do Federation” became Signatories to the Code prior to the adoption by WADA’s Executive Committee of a policy setting the conditions to be fulfilled by new organizations that wish to become Signatories.


15/10/19 FINAL DEADLINE TO REGISTER FOR WADA’S FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 15 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that the final deadline to register participants for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport – taking place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland – is this Friday, 18 October

PARTICIPANT AND ATHLETE REGISTRATION

Under the participation terms of the World Conference, organizations are permitted to register a pre-determined number of delegates for the event. This year, in order to encourage athlete participation, the Agency is inviting organizations to register one athlete as a delegate on top of their allotment listed on the Conference website. With over 1,200 participants already registered, WADA strongly encourages stakeholders to register as soon as possible in order to secure their participation.

For further information on allotments and to register participants and/or athletes by the deadline of 18 October 2019, please consult the Conference website that contains all relevant information, including: the program; the goals and objectivesintervention registration and submissionparticipation terms; and a preliminary list of confirmed speakers.

INTERVENTION SUBMISSION

As it has done at previous World Conferences, WADA will once again offer delegates the opportunity to intervene publicly during the Conference Plenary Sessions related to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

Please note that only delegates can publicly intervene and that priority will be given to those that registered their requests prior to the Conference.

To submit interventions

Delegates who registered their intervention by the 4 October 2019 deadline are strongly encouraged to provide an advance copy of their written document in English and/or French via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 21 October 2019.

Written documents should be a maximum of two A4 (or letter size) pages in length (approximately 400-500 words).

All documents will be posted on the Conference website as soon as possible after the relevant session.

While non-delegate participants are welcome to submit a written contribution, the Agency will not be able to accommodate these submissions with an intervention slot during the Conference Plenary Sessions.

Should you have any questions regarding the Conference, including queries relating to registration, accommodation and transport, please consult the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


11/10/19 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION REGARDING TECHNICAL LETTER ON IN-SITU FORMATION OF 4-ANDROSTENE-3,6,17-TRIONE (6-OXO) AND METABOLITES

Montreal, 11 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites stakeholders to participate in a consultation process regarding the following amended Technical Letter (TL):

  1. TL-21: in-situ formation of 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione (6-oxo) and metabolite

    This TL was updated following a consultation process initiated on 22 August; therefore, it is considered that a second consultation is necessary as it relates to the revised version that resulted.

    The TL includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of 6-oxo and metabolites in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The main updates are related to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) testing and reporting recommendations based on the detected levels of the major 6-oxo metabolite, i.e. 6α-hydroxyandrostenedione.

Stakeholders are invited to review this Technical Letter and provide comments by 20 October 2019, using WADA’s online consultation platform WADAConnect.

Under the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), WADA’s Technical Letters provide specific direction to WADA-accredited laboratories; WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport; and, other stakeholders on particular issues regarding the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures.

For any questions related to the above, we invite you to contact science@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


08/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES THREE NEW TECHNICAL LETTERS

Montreal, 8 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces the publication of the following new Technical Letters (TL) which were approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) at its meeting on 23 September 2019 in Tokyo, Japan:

TL-18: in-situ formation of testolactone

This new TL includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of possible detection of testolactone in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of DHEA.

TL-19: in-situ formation of prednisone and prednisolone

This new TL includes clarification regarding the possible detection of prednisone and/or prednisolone in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of cortisone and cortisol, respectively.

TL-20: in-situ formation of specific substances with a steroid structure

This new TL includes clarification regarding the possible detection of Prohibited Substances with a steroid structure in urine samples, which may result from the in-situ transformation of endogenous steroids.

All WADA-accredited Laboratories are kindly requested to implement these three new Technical Letters with immediate effect.

About Technical Letters

WADA publishes Technical Letters on an ad-hoc basis in order to provide instruction and guidance to the WADA-accredited Laboratories, WADA-approved Laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport and other stakeholders on particular issues related to the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific Laboratory procedures. Technical Letters are modified and/or withdrawn by WADA as deemed appropriate.

The Technical Letters constitute a WADA Laboratory standard document which supersedes any previous publication on a similar topic and becomes an integral part of the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), and therefore the described technical recommendations are mandatory and shall be implemented as soon as possible after approval by WADA’s ExCo and publishing on WADA’s website.

A Technical Letter shall be applied to samples which are received by the Laboratory on and after the Technical Letter’s effective date.

Previously issued Technical Letters are available and indexed on WADA’s website.

Should you have any questions regarding the above Technical Letters, we kindly invite you to contact WADA’s Science Department at science@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


04/10/19 WADA ANNOUNCES PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND NADO/RADO RELATIONS TEAM

Montreal, 4 October 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to update its stakeholders about recent structural and staff changes in its Program Development and National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO)/Regional Anti-Doping Organization (RADO) Relations (PDNRR) team.

In January 2019, a ‘stand-alone’ PDNRR Department was established within WADA. While the activities of this Department have been an integral part of WADA’s strategic priorities for years, they were previously combined with the Agency’s Education activities. After careful review, WADA recognized the increasing importance of these critical activities; and, as a result, decided to separate Education and PDNRR into stand-alone Departments. Since this time, the new Director of PDNRR, Tom May, has been busy staffing the Department; and, in cooperation with WADA’s Regional Offices in Cape Town, Lausanne, Montevideo and Tokyo, revising the overall strategy for the NADO and RADO programs.

With the staffing of the PDNRR Department now complete, we are pleased to announce the team that will further develop and implement this strategy in collaboration with WADA’s partners:

  1. Mr. Tom May – Director
    • Responsible for overall activities of the Department and the development, implementation and monitoring of WADA’s RADO and NADO relations strategies;
    • Facilitates the work of WADA’s NADO Advisory Group.
       
  2. Ms. Ieva Lukosiute-Stanikuniene – Senior Manager
    • Responsible for implementation of the NADO program strategy;
    • Supports activities of the Central Asia RADO, the Eastern Europe RADO and the Gulf States and Yemen RADO.
       
  3. Mr. Francisco Leon Cannock – Senior Manager
    • Responsible for implementation of the RADO program strategy;
    • Supports activities of the Caribbean RADO, the Central America RADO, the South America RADO and the Southeast Asia RADO.
       
  4. Ms. Michèle Mercier – Manager
    • Supports activities of the West Asia RADO, the Africa Zone I RADO, the Africa Zone II & III RADO and the Indian Ocean RADO.
       
  5. Ms. Ying Cui – Manager
    • Supports activities of the Africa Zone V RADO, the Africa Zone VI RADO, the South Asia RADO and the Oceania RADO.
       
  6. Ms. Caroline Hébert – Coordinator
    • Responsible for implementation of the RADO testing and staffing grants.
       
  7. Ms. Pascale Jean-François – Assistant
    • Provides support to all PDNRR Department activities.

Tom May stated: “With over 70 years of collective experience in anti-doping, I am confident that the Program Development and NADO/RADO Relations team, in collaboration with the Regional Offices, will deliver the necessary support that the NADO and RADO communities need. We look forward to ongoing collaboration with our stakeholders to ensure that all NADOs and RADOs are implementing effective anti-doping programs that are compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code and supporting athletes in the protection of clean sport. Reinforcing this area of activity responds to the demand by athletes that WADA ensures effective anti-doping programs in all countries and in all sports.” 

For further information regarding WADA’s Program Development and NADO/RADO Relations, please contact wada.program.development@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


03/10/19 WADA SUSPENDS ACCREDITATION OF
ATHENS LABORATORY

Montreal, 3 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of the Doping Control Laboratory of Athens, Greece for a period of up to six months.

This suspension has been imposed due to non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) as identified during a WADA site visit, including in relation to the lack of institutional support and investment for the laboratory.

In August 2019, disciplinary proceedings were initiated by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) and subsequently carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee, which was mandated to make a recommendation to the Chair of the WADA Executive Committee regarding the status of the laboratory’s accreditation. This process is now complete.

The suspension, which took effect on 1 October 2019, prohibits the laboratory from carrying out any anti-doping activities, including all analyses of urine and blood samples. During the period of suspension, relevant samples must be securely transported to another WADA-accredited laboratory for analysis, in accordance with the guidance provided in the ISL. This is in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis, which also helps preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

Pursuant to Article 13.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the laboratory may appeal this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days of receipt of notice.

During the period of suspension, the laboratory shall address all non-conformities identified by the LabEG or WADA in any request for corrective action or otherwise, as well as any additional non-conformities identified during any follow-up WADA site visit during the suspension period. If the laboratory satisfies the LabEG in meeting these requirements, it may apply for reinstatement prior to the expiry of the six-month suspension period. Should the laboratory not address the non-conformities by the end of the six-month suspension period, WADA may extend the suspension of the laboratory’s accreditation for up to an additional six months.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


03/10/19 WADA LEADS EXCITING COLLABORATION ON DRIED-BLOOD-SPOT TESTING

Montreal, 3 October 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that, over the past weeks, it has signed memoranda of understanding (MoUs) with seven Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) regarding the development and implementation of dried-blood-spot (DBS) testing. The Agency is collaborating with ADOs around the world to further research the development and implementation of this exciting method for drug testing in sport.
 
In March 2019, a meeting of various interested parties, including WADA, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the International Testing Agency (ITA) and a number of National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs) set up a steering committee to oversee the progress of this project with an objective of developing DBS testing for routine implementation in time for the 2022 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, China. An additional objective is to consider what aspects of DBS testing could potentially be implemented for the 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.
 
This steering committee, chaired by Dr. Marcia MacDonald, WADA Deputy Director, Science and Medicine, and including representatives from the IOC, ITA, the China Anti-Doping Agency (CHINADA) and the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), has appointed two working groups, one dealing with collection and transport, and the other focused on analysis and storage.
 
In leading this collaborative work, WADA has already invested USD 100,000 in the project and signed MoUs with the following organizations:

  • Antidoping Switzerland
  • Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority
  • CHINADA
  • IOC
  • ITA
  • Japan Anti-Doping Agency
  • USADA

A further objective of the project is to develop guidelines for the collection, transport, analysis and storage of DBS as well as to carry out research that may be required to achieve harmonization of practice in the anti-doping context.

In addition to the initial investment made by WADA and the above-mentioned parties, the Agency is soliciting contributions from other stakeholders and partners. Apart from financial contributions to this project and related research, NADOs and others have been encouraged to support the project in various other ways, including making additional administrative resources available.

WADA Senior Executive Director, Sciences and International Partnerships, Dr. Olivier Rabin said: “The possible advantages of DBS are clear. It has the potential to add to the current global anti-doping program by complementing existing urine and blood testing to expand upon the program’s testing coverage and capacity to better reveal doping practices. WADA is committed to making available new ways of protecting clean sport that reduce the inconvenience or discomfort for athletes and is easier, more effective and cheaper to carry out. In that way, it could be that DBS will be a major breakthrough in global anti-doping testing capacity.

“There is a real sense among project participants that DBS could be a game-changer for the anti-doping community. It is very encouraging how we are all working together on this project, optimizing time and resources, to validate this new element within the overall anti-doping toolbox. WADA is pleased to be able to lead this collective work and make its resources available to serve the team involved in this project.”

Potential advantages of DBS include:

  • Simplification of sample collection (e.g. a finger prick)
  • Less invasive than current methods of taking urine or blood samples so better for the athlete experience
  • The need for only a very small volume of blood for the test (depending on the type of analysis)
  • Less expensive to collect and transport DBS samples compared with current methods
  • Less space needed to store the samples
  • Potential benefits with regards to sample stability (less degradation)

All these advantages could allow testing authorities to target more athletes and collect more samples, including in some geographically remote areas. 

This project builds on the interest and research in DBS conducted by several ADOs and laboratories around the world. As with all new testing methods, solid validation phases are needed to ensure that routine application would add tangible and real benefits to the existing methods and protocols. Accordingly, WADA is funding a number of research projects in this area, in particular:


02/10/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2020 LIST OF PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES AND METHODS

Montreal, 30 September 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the 2020 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List); the 2020 Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2020 Monitoring Program. The List, which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) on 23 September 2019, comes into force on 1 January 2020.

The List, which is one of six International Standards that are mandatory for all Signatories of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), designates what substances and methods are prohibited both in- and out-of-competition, and which substances are banned in particular sports.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA is pleased to announce the publication of the 2020 Prohibited List. Updated annually, the List undergoes an extensive consultation period with a wide array of anti-doping stakeholders from around the globe. This is a very comprehensive process which aims to ensure that new substances and methods with doping potential – which are either currently on the market or in some cases still in clinical development – are included in the List. This helps us to protect not only the integrity of sport, but the health of athletes worldwide.”

The List is released three months ahead of it taking effect so that athletes and their entourage can acquaint themselves with any modifications. Ultimately, athletes are responsible for prohibited substances found in their body and prohibited methods found to have been used. Athlete entourage are also liable for Anti-Doping Rule Violations if determined to be complicit. Consequently, if there is any doubt as to the status of a substance or method, it is important that they contact their respective Anti-Doping Organization (International Federation or National Anti-Doping Organization) for advice.

The List’s annual revision process is led by WADA, beginning with an initial meeting in January and concluding with the publication of the List by 1 October. This is an extensive consultation process that includes WADA’s List Expert Group – composed of some of the most highly qualified experts in the world –  gathering information, including the latest scientific and medical research, trends, and intelligence gathered from law enforcement and pharmaceutical companies; circulating a draft List among stakeholders; taking their submissions into consideration; and revising the draft, followed by review by the Agency’s Health, Medical and Research (HMR) Committee. The HMR Committee then makes its recommendation to the WADA ExCo, which approves the List during its September meeting.

For a substance or method to be added to the List, it must be determined that it meets at least two of the following three criteria:

  1. It has the potential to enhance or enhances sport performance
  2. It represents an actual or potential health risk to the athletes
  3. It violates the spirit of sport

It should be noted that for athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method that is on the List, they may be accommodated if they meet the criteria outlined in the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE). The TUE process has overwhelming acceptance from athletes, physicians and anti-doping stakeholders worldwide.

Languages and Formats

The 2020 Prohibited List; the 2020 Summary of Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2020 Monitoring Program are available for download on WADA’s website in English and French with Spanish to follow shortly.

Stakeholders wishing to translate the List into other languages are kindly asked to signal their interest at info@wada-ama.org, by 31 October 2019. If interested, WADA would provide the necessary files and, once the translation is finalized, would make the List available on the Agency’s website.

The List’s mobile-friendly digital edition will go live on 1 January 2020.


01/10/19 WADA EDUCATION – HELPING ATHLETES WHO WANT TO COMPETE CLEAN

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to introduce ‘Spotlight’, a new communications tool that aims to inform stakeholders of the daily activities being carried out around the globe by the WADA team and its partners to deliver on Clean Sport. In this issue, we look at the priority area of education and how it fits into the broader anti-doping landscape.

Under the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), education is designed to preserve the spirit of sport from being undermined with the objective of preventing intentional or unintentional use of prohibited substances and methods. In line with this, WADA’s Education Department supports athletes that want to train and compete clean. In short, the Department aims to increase access to education and information programs worldwide for athletes and their support personnel; and, provides support, guidance and tools for athletes and stakeholders to help them create and implement education programs. Clean Sport education:is fundamentally based on the principle that athletes start in sport clean and that most athletes want to remain clean;is underpinned by social science research that helps us understand the complexities of doping behavior and supports our decision making;is a core component of any anti-doping program; andwill be strengthened via the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code review; in particular, through the introduction of a new International Standard for Education. WADA’s Education Team. From left to right: Tony Cunningham, Senior Manager; Amanda Hudson, Director and Kangeun Lee, Manager. 
Stakeholder call for increased research-led education

At WADA’s March 2019 Annual Symposium in Lausanne, Switzerland, stakeholders from the anti-doping community were asked to select which of WADA’s strategic priorities they believed would have the most positive impact on the global anti-doping program. The number-one answer was to ‘increase research-led education’.

This may come as a surprise to some given the higher public profile of other areas of the anti-doping program. The public focus, and indeed the anti-doping community itself, has tended towards catching cheats, which begs the question: what happens when virtually the only narrative around anti-doping is about those who have been caught doping versus those that compete clean?

Is it time to change the lens by which we view anti-doping? Should we focus more on the protection of clean sport and the majority of sports people out there doing their best to navigate the anti-doping system and the rules?

WADA’s new Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “The global anti-doping movement is shifting. It is recognizing that the majority of stakeholders in sport are trying to do the right thing and that as an anti-doping community we must do more to help and promote them. Our efforts to preserve the spirt of sport from the outset must significantly increase. Education plays a fundamental role in this. It gives athletes and those involved in sport the opportunity to learn about clean sport, its importance and the role they play in maintaining and protecting it.”  

“It is likely clear to most people that doping is cheating, steroids are banned and athletes can be tested. However, what is possibly not so clear to all is the complexity of the anti-doping system, i.e.: the ten different types of Anti-Doping Rule Violations (far more than simply failing a urine test); the regulation required to harmonize anti-doping globally — not just the Code but also the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport; and, the simple fact that there are many substances banned in sport, some of which can be found in everyday over-the-counter medications. Equally, and very importantly, helping those bound by anti-doping rules to understand them; as well as, their rights and responsibilities is something WADA and our stakeholders must continue to commit to.”

Balancing deterring/detecting and preserving/protecting

The development of the global anti-doping program is a very positive story. The idea that, within 20 years of WADA’s creation, a global harmonized anti-doping program has been implemented in almost every country and sport in the world is a phenomenal achievement for any industry or health discipline.

The underlining ethos for most of this time has been one of deterrence and detection, an approach that is an essential part of the anti-doping eco-system. However, as our understanding has increased through research, we recognize that simply deterring and detecting is not enough. Like healthcare, we must not simply detect illnesses and try to deal with them without also focusing on: prevention; early development of healthy behaviors; understanding who is more at risk and why; etc. All are essential to protect health. And so, like health, the anti-doping community continues to increase its prevention efforts, addressing the balance between deterring/detecting and preserving/protecting. Education and the promotion of clean sport behaviors are clearly integral to the system.

International Standard for Education will enable a big boost for Clean Sport

Understanding the complexity of doping behavior and what drives athletes’ decision making is key to all parts of the anti-doping system. As such, much of the challenge to improving the understanding of anti-doping by stakeholders lies in improved education, not just of athletes, but of the support networks around them and importantly of those working in the anti-doping system itself. 1 January 2021 will see a significant reinforcement of education in the proposed 2021 Code; and, perhaps most significant of all, introduction of a new International Standard for Education. This Standard will enable stakeholders to consider those in their sporting landscape who would benefit from education; plan how to reach them; provide education opportunities for them to access; and, then engage to gather feedback for improvements.

This new Standard recognizes that each Anti-Doping Organization will need to prioritize and deliver within their means; and, in some cases, rely on other tools such as WADA’s education materials to assist them. WADA, through its Anti-Doping e-Learning platform (ADeL), has education programs designed for core target audiences; such as: athletes, coaches, medical professionals and parents; as well as, additional resources for personnel leading anti-doping programs and university students. This means that as we enter a new phase of the Code, there should be a strong commitment to provide educational opportunities for those who require them and very little reason not to. “WADA invests in its ADeL platform and other tools because we believe that athletes and those around the athlete must have the opportunity to learn about clean sport and the anti-doping regulations,” said Kangeun Lee, Manager, Education. “We are committed to helping our stakeholders meet every athlete’s right to education as part of a balanced anti-doping program.”

What the research is telling us

So, what difference will this make? We know from a Leeds Beckett research project, which was published by WADA in 2016, that research indicated reasonably broad knowledge of what doping was about among parents, coaches, trainers and medical professionals – collectively known as “athlete support personnel”.

The report also highlighted a significant minority that said that they might encourage athletes to dope “if they were convinced that it would help their athletes and have no negative health implications”. This insight shows us that there is still a long way to go before all involved in sport have the relevant, in-depth knowledge required to prevent both intentional and unintentional doping, and that only a planned and focused effort can change this over the long-term.

In terms of addressing this, Tony Cunningham, Senior Manager, Education and WADA’s lead for Social Science research, stated: “A first important step is a simple change in perspective rather than a paradigm shift. Acknowledging that any prevention system must have detection and deterrence; and, a core tenet must move towards supporting those who wish to compete clean. Promisingly, the new 2021 Code promotes this holistic approach to prevention. This could possibly have a profound impact on how anti-doping and clean sport is viewed; and, in turn, facilitate a more supportive environment towards the goals of clean sport. We know from research that the majority of athletes – even the ones who are already doping – want to compete clean. We also see cases of inadvertent doping across the system. These are largely preventable if athletes and athlete support personnel are educated and informed to navigate everyday risks; and, their sporting environment nurtures and reinforces clean sport behavior.”

“We need to focus much more on helping this majority train and compete clean by reinforcing core values early on in athletes’ sporting experience; and then, instilling the behaviors that they need to participate in line with the anti-doping rules – all through education. Athletes start in sport clean. A lack of knowledge should not be the reason their career ends. As an anti-doping community, we need to work together to educate athletes – to help protect them, their health and the integrity of sport.”

Find out more about WADA’s education activities.


26/09/19 AUSTRALIA AND FRANCE TO HOST WADA GLOBAL EDUCATION CONFERENCES
IN 2020 AND 2022

Montreal, 26 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that, following a public bidding process, Australia and France have been selected as the respective host countries for WADA’s 2020 and 2022 Global Education Conferences.

Similar to the successful Education Conferences WADA convened in 2015 (in Ottawa, Canada) and 2018 (in Beijing, China), the 2020 and 2022 Conferences will gather anti-doping researchers and practitioners from around the world to examine emerging trends, contribute to education program development, and examine how Anti-Doping Organizations can enhance their programs while keeping the athlete at the center of their strategies.

WADA Director of Education, Amanda Hudson said: “WADA is delighted that Australia and France will be hosting the next two editions of the Agency’s Global Education Conference. The applications submitted by both countries were of such high quality that we were able to confirm Australia as the host for 2020 and France as the host for 2022. We look forward to working with the Australian Government, with support from the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA), and the French National Anti-Doping Organization [Agence française de lutte contre le dopage (AFLD)] over the next few years to deliver world class Education Conferences that will help to enhance anti-doping education programs around the globe.”

Ahead of the anticipated launch of the International Standard for Education in January 2021– the most significant development in anti-doping education policy since the World Anti-Doping Program’s inception – WADA’s Global Education Conference will cement itself as the headline event for educators in the anti-doping community. With over 250 participants expected to attend the 2020 edition, WADA hopes to continue to raise the bar in order to ensure that athletes and their support personnel have access to quality anti-doping education, which will help protect them and sport from being damaged by intentional or unintentional use of prohibited substances and methods.

Australian Minister for Youth and Sport, Hon. Richard Colbeck, welcomed WADA’s decision to bring the 2020 Global Education Conference to Australia saying: “Hosting this conference is a great opportunity for Australia to champion its work in delivering high quality sports anti-doping education.”

AFLD President, Dominique Laurent, said: “I am delighted that WADA has chosen our bid, which received the support from the Ministry of Sports, the French National Olympic Committee, Paris 2024, the City of Nice and AFLD’s Athlete Committee. AFLD has made a strategic priority of international cooperation and the reinforcement of anti-doping education programs in France. Two years prior to the Paris 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games, I am convinced that hosting the 2022 Global Education Conference in France will mark another important milestone in the protection of clean athletes and the promotion of ethics in sport.”

The 2015 and 2018 editions of the Global Education Conference convened 200 and 178 participants, respectively, from National Anti-Doping Organizations, Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, National and International Federations, National Olympic Committees and Research Institutions.


25/09/19 WADA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2020 STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIR VACANCIES

Montreal, 25 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is seeking nominations for 2020 for the Chairs of four (of its five) Standing Committees, which report into WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board) and act as advisory committees, providing guidance for the Agency’s programs.
 
The current Standing Committee Chair terms end on 31 December 2019. This public call applies to the following four vacancies:

  1. Athlete Committee
  2. Education Committee
  3. Finance and Administration Committee
  4. Health, Medical and Research Committee

The successful candidates will take office on 23 January 2020 [the date that WADA’s ExCo will approve the nominations]; and, their terms will conclude on 31 December 2022; after which, candidates may reapply to continue for two further three-year periods.

The term of the Agency’s Compliance Review Committee Chair also concludes on 31 December 2019; however, this role will be filled via a different process due to a stricter requirement for independence. The newly formed Nominations Committee will be responsible for recruiting, reviewing and vetting the candidates for this specific position, and for setting the related processes.

Standing Committee Chair Role

Below, WADA is pleased to provide links to the revised Role Description/Position Profiles and Terms of Reference for each of the Committee Chair positions, which outline the scope of work and detail the functioning of the respective Committees.

How to apply

To be considered, all applications must be forwarded by Friday, 1 November 2019 to Mr Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General, (c/o e-mail: marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org or fax: +1 514 904 8743).

In the case of the Athlete Committee Chair, the closing date to submit applications is Thursday, 24 October 2019. This special timeline is required as the WADA Athlete Committee will be reviewing the applications, which is not the case for the other positions.

All nominations must include the following:

  • a maximum one-page cover (motivational) letter;
  • an updated curriculum vitae, which fully captures the candidate’s experience and expertise;
  • letters of endorsement from at least two members of WADA’s Board (one representing the Olympic Movement and one representing the Public Authorities); and
  • a signed declaration of independence form.

Any questions can also be directed to Mr Niggli, c/o Ms Chinnarassen.
 
Governance Reforms and Independence
 
As it relates to independence, in 2017 and 2018, WADA carried out a governance review, which resulted in a series of reforms that were endorsed by WADA’s Board in November 2018; including, that certain independence criteria be applied to some governance roles.
 
Accordingly, the Chair of each of these four Committees will need to meet the following requirements of WADA’s General Standard of Independence as stipulated below:
 
“An individual is considered independent when he/she remains free of undue influence, is independent in character and judgment and there are no relationships or circumstances which to an informed third party could affect, or could appear to affect, the individual’s judgment.”
 
About WADA
 
Formed in 1999, WADA is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the Sports Movement and Governments of the world. As the global regulatory body, WADA’s primary role is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Its key activities include: ensuring and monitoring effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code and its related International Standards; scientific and social science research; education; intelligence and investigations; and building anti-doping capacity with anti-doping organizations worldwide.
 
WADA’s vision is a world where all athletes can compete in a doping-free sporting environment; and, the Agency’s mission is to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport.
 
WADA is composed of a 38-member Board, which is WADA’s supreme decision-making body; a 12-member ExCo, which is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and several Committees. The Board and ExCo are composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments. The Board delegates the actual management and running of the Agency, including the performance of activities and the administration of assets, to the ExCo.


25/09/19 WADA SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2020 STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER VACANCIES

Montreal, 25 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is seeking nominations for 2020 for a number of vacant member positions on its five Standing Committees, which report into WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board). The successful candidates will take office on or before 1 March 2020, which is the date that the nominations will be approved by WADA’s ExCo.
 
There will be various vacant positions on WADA’s five Committees in 2020. The number of vacancies on each Committee varies subject to the current composition and rotation that is in place. The five Committees are:

  1. Athlete Committee   
  2. Compliance Review Committee
  3. Education Committee
  4. Finance and Administration Committee     
  5. Health, Medical and Research Committee 

[Note that there is one vacant position on the Compliance Review Committee and it is specifically to represent the Public Authorities.]
 
In accordance with WADA’s governing rules concerning Standing Committee composition and rotation, on an annual basis, the Agency seeks nominations from its stakeholders for candidates to fill upcoming vacancies. Accordingly, WADA invites its stakeholders to consider their respective regions and organizations; and, to nominate suitable candidates.
 
It must be noted that, in 2017 and 2018, WADA carried out a governance review, which resulted in a series of reforms that were endorsed by WADA’s Board in November 2018; including that, WADA’s Standing Committees are to be composed of a maximum of 12 members. In the past, some of the Committees have exceeded this number; and therefore, in order to adhere to this number and achieve an equal rotation, a maximum of four members only change each year based on terms of three years. However, in 2020, given that the positions of Chair are also vacant, there is a maximum of three member vacancies per Committee.
 
Also, exceptionally for 2020, Member terms will commence on 1 March vs. 1 January. This is due to the timing of certain governance reforms, which must be completed before the Standing Committees can be presented for approval by WADA’s ExCo.
 
Another recommendation resulting from the governance review was that the Education, Finance and Administration, and Health, Medical and Research Standing Committees must include an Athlete and a National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO) representative. Some Committees already have such members; whereas, others need to be appointed for 2020. We encourage Athletes and NADOs to consider these opportunities.
 
Standing Committee Member Role
 
Below, WADA is pleased to provide links to the revised Terms of Reference for each WADA Standing Committee, which outlines the scope of work and details the functioning of the respective Committees.

How to apply

To be considered, all nominations must include the following and be forwarded by Friday, 20 December 2019, to Mr Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General (c/o e-mail: 
marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org
 or fax: +1 514 904 8743):

  • an updated curriculum vitae, which fully outlines the candidate’s experience and expertise; and
  • a letter of endorsement from one of WADA’s current Board members or a recognized WADA stakeholder group.

 Any questions can also be directed to Mr Niggli, c/o Ms Chinnarassen.
 
 About WADA

Formed in 1999, WADA is an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the Sports Movement and Governments of the world. As the global regulatory body, WADA’s primary role is to develop, harmonize and coordinate anti-doping rules and policies across all sports and countries. Its key activities include: ensuring and monitoring effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code and its related International Standards; scientific and social science research; education; intelligence and investigations; and building anti-doping capacity with anti-doping organizations worldwide.
 
WADA’s vision is a world where all athletes can compete in a doping-free sporting environment; and, the Agency’s mission is to lead a collaborative worldwide movement for doping-free sport.
 
WADA is composed of a 38-member Board,  which is WADA’s supreme decision-making body; a 12-member ExCo, which is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and  several Committees. The Board and ExCo are composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments. The Board delegates the actual management and running of the Agency, including the performance of activities and the administration of assets, to the ExCo.


24/09/19 WADA AND JAPAN SIGN AGREEMENT TO CONTINUE REGIONAL ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATION FUNDING

Tokyo, 24 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the Government of Japan signed an agreement on Tuesday that continues Japan’s long-running support for Regional Anti-Doping Organizations (RADOs) in Asia.

The agreement was signed by WADA President Sir Craig Reedie and Commissioner of the Japan Sports Agency (JSA) Daichi Suzuki during a two-day international anti-doping seminar for Asia and Oceania in Tokyo, hosted by the Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA). The partnership means that the JSA will strengthen its commitment to further develop RADOs in the Asia region beyond 2019.

The funding will continue to assist RADOs with the development of anti-doping programs and provide funds for WADA to help with the training of anti-doping officials in the region.

Sir Craig said: “Japan has been making a significant contribution to the Asian RADOs since 2008 and we are grateful to the Japanese Government for extending it by another 12 months at least. This close cooperation between Japan, WADA and the RADOs has borne fruit over the years, particularly as it relates to building anti-doping capacity. This has led to the RADOs establishing positive reputations and strengthening the overall program throughout the region.”

Mr Suzuki said: “Japan has supported WADA’s international activities ever since its establishment in 1999 and we are committed to seeing that partnership continue into the future. In particular, we have always encouraged the Asian countries for the development of anti-doping activities in the region. In addition, since 2008, Japan has provided assistance to Asian RADOs in cooperation with WADA. It is very significant that we sign today the partnership agreement for the assistance to RADOs to strengthen our cooperation.

“Now we are accelerating promotion of training of Doping Control Officers, enhancement of laboratory and investigation and intelligence programs in cooperation with the Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee, the Japan Sport Council and JADA for doping-free Games in Tokyo 2020. As a legacy project, we also started the ‘I Play True Relay’ to invite play true messages from all over the world to deliver the value of sport for the future.”

There are five RADOs in Asia working across 36 countries, with particular emphasis on compliance to the World Anti-Doping Code. The RADO program helps develop Code-compliant systems that encompass testing, education and general awareness of anti-doping issues in smaller countries while ensuring that resources can be pooled and used more effectively.

It means that the long-term sustainability and level of testing and anti-doping education worldwide can be enhanced and ensure that athletes, regardless of their location or sport, are subject to robust anti-doping protocols and processes. Globally, the program includes 15 RADOs involving 130 participating nations.

Meanwhile, WADA is taking an active role in the two-day international anti-doping seminar for Asia and Oceania in Tokyo this week with Sir Craig addressing the meeting and Director General Olivier Niggli making a detailed presentation on WADA’s priorities and the continued development of the global anti-doping program.

The event, which is open to media on the morning of the first day, also sees the next WADA President, Witold Banka, and the next WADA Vice-President, Yang Yang, form part of an athlete panel that includes former Olympian Daichi Suzuki as well as member of the IOC Athlete Commission, WADA Athlete Committee and WADA Executive Committee (ExCo), Danka Bartekova and JADA Athlete Committee member Masaki Fujita. The panel will explore the opportunities for athletes to leave a meaningful anti-doping legacy, particularly in the context of next year’s Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo.

Several WADA Directors and other staff members are playing active roles in the seminar, all of whom are in Tokyo for other meetings, in particular the WADA ExCo on 23 September. A topic that is dominating proceedings is the effective implementation of the Code and associated International Standards in light of their ongoing review, which will culminate with their adoption at the World Conference on Doping in Sport in Katowice, Poland in November. Following what has been an extensive and fully collaborative process, the revised documents will come into force on 1 January 2021.


24/09/19 WADA AND KYOWA KIRIN CO. SIGN AGREEMENT FORMALIZING COLLABORATION TO PROTECT CLEAN SPORT

Tokyo, 24 September 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) on Monday, 23 September, signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with major Japanese pharmaceutical company Kyowa Kirin Co., which will ensure that the Agency is notified immediately of any new Kyowa Kirin compounds or substances in development that have the potential for sports-related abuse.

The MOU, which was signed in Tokyo by WADA President Sir Craig Reedie and Kyowa Kirin President and CEO, Dr. Masashi Miyamoto, is a commitment on the part of Kyowa Kirin to support WADA in its protection of clean sport. Consequently, Kyowa Kirin has already established an internal process to identify compounds in development that could be used to gain an unfair advantage in the sporting arena.

Following the signing, Sir Craig said: “It is important for WADA to continue to partner with leading pharmaceutical and healthcare research organizations around the world such as Kyowa Kirin for the benefit of both communities. We have a long tradition of collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry and this partnership will help WADA develop new strategies to identify substances that could be subject to misuse and abuse.

“Doping in sport relies heavily on the misuse of commercially available substances developed for proper therapeutic use as well as newly discovered compounds. Learning about those new compounds while they are still in development gives us a head-start as we devise our own strategies, whether that is in the area of education, detection or investigation. I would like to thank Dr. Miyamoto and his team at Kyowa Kirin for their commitment to supporting WADA as we target those who would attempt to abuse legitimate medicines for doping purposes. The Agency looks forward to a long and fruitful collaboration.”

Dr. Satoshi Nakanishi, Executive Officer, Director of the Corporate Social Responsibility Management Department, Kyowa Kirin, said: “Misuse and abuse of medicine for doping in sport not only endangers athletes’ health and the fairness of competition but also damages the sustainability of medical development in the pharmaceutical industry. This collaboration with WADA is one of our actions to solve social health-related issues and enhance quality of life to contribute to the health and well-being of people around the world. This is also one of our missions as a pharmaceutical company.”

It is anticipated that WADA and Kyowa Kirin will explore the potential for a more extensive collaboration in the future. Since 2011, WADA has been forging alliances with a number of companies within the pharmaceutical sector in order to keep up to date with the ever-shifting drug research and development landscape. These agreements have included some of the biggest and most influential drug firms in the world, such as GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer and Roche, as well as the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. In that time, WADA and the global anti-doping program have benefitted from advance notice of potentially performance-enhancing substances before they are released to the market, allowing the Agency to develop detection methods at a much faster rate.


23/09/19 WADA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE DISCUSSES RUSADA CODE COMPLIANCE

Tokyo, 23 September 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) held an Executive Committee (ExCo) meeting in Tokyo, Japan, which was graciously hosted by the country’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The 12-member ExCo is WADA’s ultimate policy-making body and is composed equally of representatives from the Sports Movement and Governments.

While the ExCo approved the 2020 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List), which will be published before 1 October 2019 and come into effect on 1 January 2020, the full-day meeting primarily focused on other matters and decisions related to World Anti-Doping Code (Code) compliance, the 2021 Code Review process, WADA governance reforms and other topics related to science and medicine – the main ones that are outlined in the summary below.

Reflecting on the day’s events, WADA President, Sir Craig Reedie, said: “I am pleased with the discussions that the Executive Committee had on a number of key matters for the future of WADA and Clean Sport on the whole. The quality of the debate and the involvement of all stakeholders bode well as we head towards the World Conference on Doping in Sport in November; during which, decisions will be taken that will strengthen the global anti-doping program.”

Code Compliance: RUSADA

The ExCo received an update from the Chair of the independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) concerning compliance of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) with the Code.

The ExCo was informed that good progress was being made by WADA’s Intelligence and Investigations Department (I&I) in analyzing the data retrieved from the Moscow Laboratory in January 2019. To date, 47 cases have already been identified and evidentiary packages sent to the relevant International Federations (IFs) as per the process outlined by WADA in July, and several disciplinary proceedings have been commenced by the IFs based on that evidence.

The ExCo was also informed that further investigation, by WADA I&I and independent experts in digital forensics, of the inconsistencies in the Moscow Laboratory data outlined in WADA’s press release dated 2 July 2019 had led WADA to open a formal compliance procedure against RUSADA on 17 September 2019. Ensuring the authenticity of the Moscow Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) and underlying raw data was one of the critical conditions imposed by the ExCo for RUSADA to maintain its compliance with the Code when the ExCo decided to reinstate RUSADA as Code-compliant in September 2018.

The ExCo was advised that WADA had decided to pursue the compliance procedure against RUSADA on a fast-track basis, in accordance with Article 9.5 of the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS). RUSADA and the Russian Ministry of Sport have been provided with copies of the reports of WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts that detail the inconsistencies in question and have been given three weeks to provide their comments, together with answers to a list of specific questions.

Once that response has been received and analyzed, WADA I&I and the independent forensic experts will report back to the CRC, so that the CRC is in a position to decide whether to bring a formal recommendation to the ExCo. No fixed timeline can be set for this, as due process must be respected, but the ExCo was assured that WADA is pursuing the matter robustly and as quickly as practicable.

In the meantime, the process of using the remaining data from the Moscow Laboratory and other forms of evidence to bring more cheats to justice continues. The aforementioned 47 cases are unaffected and contained no inconsistencies in the data.

Code Compliance: International Taekwon-Do Federation

The ExCo approved the CRC’s recommendation asserting that the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF Austria) is non-compliant with the Code and proposing appropriate consequences. This Code Signatory organization did not complete WADA’s Code Compliance Questionnaire, which is a critical requirement under the ISCCS, despite multiple WADA reminders and offers of assistance. It will now be formally notified about its non-compliance and will have 21 days to dispute WADA’s assertion of non-compliance.

It should be noted that ITF Austria is not the IF that regulates the sport of Taekwon-Do globally. It was accepted as a Code Signatory before WADA implemented a policy in 2009 to ensure that no organization could become a Signatory if it had a conflict with an existing Signatory. The World Taekwon-Do Federation (WTF) is the Olympic IF for the sport and is not affected by this assertion of non-compliance.

Governance Reforms

The ExCo received a detailed progress report on the implementation and timing of WADA’s  wide-ranging governance reforms, which were approved by the Foundation Board (Board) in November 2018 and, regarding which, an implementation plan was laid out in May 2019

As regards the composition of the inaugural five-person Nominations Committee, which is set to play a key role over the coming months in shaping WADA’s governance, individuals were proposed by an independent consultancy firm and approved by the ExCo. The names of those individuals will be publicly announced shortly once they have been officially informed.

The role of the Nominations Committee will be to ensure that the right people, in terms of skills and independence, serve in senior governance roles within WADA. In particular, the Committee will recommend appropriate individuals to chair WADA’s Standing Committees as well as two new independent members of the ExCo next year. The ExCo also approved the terms of reference for the Agency’s five Standing Committees as well as the corresponding Chair profiles, which will be published this week as part of a public call for interest for the Standing Committee Chair vacancies for 2020.

2021 Code and International Standards

The ExCo received a detailed progress report regarding the latest drafts of the 2021 Code and related International Standards, which have been subject of a two-year, three-phase, stakeholder consultation.

The ExCo provided comments on the latest drafts and was advised that some minor amendments will be made before publishing the final drafts of the revised Code and Standards – as well as the two new proposed Standards (covering education and results management) –
mid-October in preparation for these documents being adopted at the World Conference on Doping in Sport, which will take place in Katowice, Poland, from 5-7 November. The revised Code and Standards and the two new Standards will enter into force on 1 January 2021.

Athlete Committee Chair Report

The ExCo received an update from the Chair of WADA’s Athlete Committee concerning a number of projects that they are leading. These include the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights that they initiated in 2017; the establishment of an ombudsperson resource for anti-doping within WADA; and the matter of enhanced athlete representation within WADA’s governance structure.

The ExCo made a number of suggestions related to the three projects, which the Athlete Committee will address in the course of its work over the coming weeks.  

Science and Medicine

Beyond approval of the 2020 List, which contains minor changes from the current 2019 List, the ExCo approved funding recommendations for research proposals for WADA’s 2019 call for scientific research grants. A total of 19 projects were selected for funding amounting to USD 1,946,283, with more than half (USD 1,087,693) coming from WADA’s Special Research Fund and the remainder from the 2019 WADA Research Project.

In addition, the ExCo approved funding of USD 250,000 for one research proposal on artificial intelligence (AI), with the funding coming from the Agency’s Special Research Fund. This project – which is the third being funded by WADA in relation to AI – is covered by the agreement signed between the Agency and the Fonds de Recherche du Québec in May 2018 specifically to fund research in a number of areas including AI.

Further to the adoption in September 2018 of a new Technical Document for Athlete Passport Management Units (APMUs) that came into effect on 1 March 2019, the ExCo granted approval to ten WADA-accredited laboratories to manage APMUs. This APMU status, which confirms that these laboratories fulfill a number of quality and independence criteria, will allow the laboratories in question to drive essential anti-doping activities in relation to the Athlete Biological Passport program. The relevant laboratories are: Barcelona, Spain; Cologne, Germany; Ghent, Belgium; Lausanne, Switzerland; Oslo, Norway; Paris, France; Seibersdorf, Austria; Sydney, Australia; Tokyo, Japan; and Warsaw, Poland.

Revised Technical Document for Sport Specific Analysis (TDSSA)

A revised TDSSA was approved by the ExCo following a comprehensive consultation process with stakeholders. The document, which will come into effect 1 January 2020, will provide Anti-Doping Organizations with more flexibility in its implementation while continuing to ensure that minimum levels of analysis for specific prohibited substances within the scope of the TDSSA are harmonized globally across sports and disciplines. The revised TDSSA will be published on 1 October.


17/09/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2018 ANNUAL REPORT THEMED ‘THE RIGHT WAY TOGETHER’

Montreal, 17 September 2019 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published its 2018 Annual Report. This Report outlines the Agency’s various activities last year that, alongside its partners, have led to a strengthened global anti-doping system. Under the title ‘The Right Way Together’, the Annual Report is an important element of WADA’s commitment to accountability and transparency.

With WADA’s vision and 11 key strategic priorities guiding the way, the Annual Report demonstrates how WADA is performing against these and how progress continues to be made. WADA’s extensive activities related to World Anti-Doping Code (Code) compliance monitoring, investigations, science, education, data protection, capacity-building and others, continue to form the framework of the Agency’s day-to-day efforts.

WADA President Sir Craig Reedie said: “While 2018 was another challenging year for WADA, we are proud to say that it saw a number of important and far-reaching decisions being made that better equipped the Agency to pursue our evolving mission as the global regulator of clean sport.

“In September 2018, the Executive Committee (ExCo) decided to reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency as compliant with the Code, breaking a long-running impasse and, in the process, enabling WADA to gain access to the all-important Moscow Laboratory data and samples that are now being used to bring more cheats to justice. And in November, the approval by the Foundation Board (Board) of a raft of wide-ranging governance reforms will make WADA more independent and more representative of our stakeholders, for the good of clean sport around the world. 

“Helping fund WADA’s increased activities, in November 2017 and May 2018 the Board approved increases to the Agency’s 2017 budget by 8% each year between 2018 and 2022. This commitment demonstrates the importance of WADA’s mission and the faith that the Board maintains in its management.

“Working with and listening to all our stakeholders in every aspect of the Agency’s mandate remains the defining constant that leads to our progress. This Report is a snapshot of WADA’s collaborative achievements alongside its partners to strengthen clean sport around the world.”

Regarding WADA’s partners, in their joint message in the Report, Sir Craig and Director General Olivier Niggli “acknowledge and thank the 158 volunteers, which make up WADA’s Board, ExCo, Standing Committees, Ethics Panel, and Expert and Advisory Groups. Like most sporting bodies, our talented and dedicated volunteers are the backbone of the Agency. Without their engagement, time and expertise, the Agency and clean sport would simply not advance.”

With an actual 2018 budget of USD 35.4 million, WADA closed out the year with a workforce of 117 people employed at its headquarters in Montreal, Canada, and its offices in Cape Town, Tokyo, Lausanne, and Montevideo. Together, the WADA team collaborates day-in and day-out with its partners to preserve the integrity of sport and uphold the values of fair play for athletes worldwide.

In keeping with our sustainability efforts, the Annual Report is being published online.


13/09/19 FINAL DEADLINES TO REGISTER PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS FOR WADA’S FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

DEADLINE TO REGISTER INTERVENTIONS IS 4 OCTOBER AND PARTICIPANTS IS 18 OCTOBER

WADA ENCOURAGES ORGANIZATIONS TO REGISTER ATHLETE DELEGATES

Montreal, 13 September 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce that it has extended the deadline to register participants for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport – taking place in Katowice, Poland from 5-7 November – to 18 October. The Agency also takes this opportunity to remind delegates that should they wish to make a public intervention during the Conference, the deadline to register is 4 October.

PARTICIPANT AND ATHLETE REGISTRATION

Under the participation terms of the World Conference, organizations are permitted to register a pre-determined number of delegates for the event. This year, in order to encourage athlete participation, the Agency is inviting organizations to register one athlete as a delegate on top of their allotment listed on the Conference website. With over 1,100 participants already registered, WADA strongly encourages stakeholders to register as soon as possible in order to secure participation.

For further information on allotments and to register participants and/or athletes by the deadline of 18 October, please consult the Conference website that contains all relevant information, including: the program; the goals and objectivesintervention registration and submissionparticipation terms; and a preliminary list of confirmed speakers.

INTERVENTION REGISTRATION AND SUBMISSION

As it has done at previous World Conferences, WADA will once again offer delegates the opportunity to intervene publicly during the Conference Plenary Sessions related to the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

Please note that only delegates can publicly intervene and that priority will be given to those that register their request to intervene prior to the Conference. Due to the high number of interventions expected, they will be limited to three minutes each. In the event that more intervention requests are received than available slots, WADA will be required to prioritize the interventions and/or possibly shorten the time offered.

The process for registering and submitting interventions is outlined in full on the Conference website and the key highlights are summarized below:To register interventions Delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Plenary Sessions (related to the Code) should register their interest via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 4 October 2019.

The same process applies to delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Side Sessions of the Conference where the focus will be on the various International Standards and the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights.To submit interventionsDelegates who wish to make an intervention in Katowice are strongly encouraged to provide an advance copy of their written document in English and/or French via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 21 October 2019.

Written documents should be a maximum of two A4 (or letter size) pages in length (approximately 400-500 words).

All documents will be posted on the Conference website as soon as possible after the relevant session.

While non-delegate participants are welcome to submit a written contribution, the Agency will not be able to accommodate these submissions with an intervention slot during the Conference Plenary Sessions.

Should you have any questions regarding the Conference, including queries relating to registration, accommodation and transport, please consult the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


11/09/19 2017 ADRVs REPORT ‘PRE-RELEASE’ CONSULTATION

Montreal, 11 September 2019

Dear Colleagues,

In accordance with Articles 14.4 and 14.5 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), WADA, acting as a central clearinghouse for Doping Control testing results, annually publishes statistical reports summarizing the information that it receives from Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs).

Today, we are pleased to provide ADOs with a ‘pre-release’ of the 2017 Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) Report, which is presented in the following four sections, and includes analytical ADRVs as a result of Adverse Analytical Findings (AAFs) reported by the WADA-accredited laboratories and non-analytical ADRVs reported to WADA by ADOs:

  • Section 1: Outcomes of 2017 AAFs by Sport Category
  • Section 2: Outcomes of 2017 AAFs by Testing Authority
  • Section 3: Report of 2017 Non-Analytical ADRVs
  • Section 4: Report of 2017 Total Analytical and Non-Analytical ADRVs

WADA provides the Report to you in advance of public distribution so that you can review and/or comment on the data of your respective ADO before it is published. Accordingly, should you wish to comment, kindly do so no later than 25 September 2019 via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online consultation platform. Easy to use, WADAConnect will prompt you to create a user account and input your comments. For further information related to WADAConnect, please refer to the simple user guide.

Should you have any other questions or comments concerning the 2017 ADRVs Report, we invite you to contact statistics@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


23/08/19 WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION REGARDING TECHNICAL LETTERS ON IN SITU FORMATION OF SPECIFIC SUBSTANCES

Montreal, 22 August 2019 

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites stakeholders to participate in a consultation process regarding four new Technical Letters:

  1. TL-18: in situ formation of 4-androstene-3,6,17-trione (6-oxo) and metabolites;

This Technical Letter includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of 6-oxo and Metabolites in urine samples, which may result from the in situ transformation of DHEA.

  1. TL-19: in situ formation of testolactone;

This Technical Letter includes guidance regarding the interpretation and reporting of testolactone in urine samples, which may result from the in situ transformation of DHEA.

  1. TL-20: in situ formation of prednisone and prednisolone; and 

This Technical Letter includes clarification regarding the possible detection of prednisone and/or prednisolone in urine samples, which may result from the in situ transformation of cortisone and cortisol, respectively.

  1. TL-21: in situ formation of specific substances with a steroid structure.

This Technical Letter includes clarification regarding the possible detection of Prohibited Substances with a steroid structure in urine samples, which may result from the in situtransformation of endogenous steroids.

Stakeholders are invited to review these Technical Letters and provide comments by 1 September 2019, using WADA’s online consultation platform, WADAConnect.

Under the International Standard for Laboratories, WADA’s Technical Letters provide specific direction to the WADA-accredited laboratories; WADA-approved laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport; and, other stakeholders on particular issues regarding the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or on the application of specific laboratory procedures.

For any questions related to the above, we invite you to contact science@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


22/08/19 WADA SUSPENDS ACCREDITATION OF NEW DELHI LABORATORY

Montreal, 22 August 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has suspended the accreditation of the National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL) in New Delhi, India, for a period of up to six months.

This suspension has been imposed due to non-conformities with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL) as identified during a WADA site visit, including in relation to the laboratory’s isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) analytical method, as regulated by the relevant technical document (TD2016IRMS).

In May 2019, disciplinary proceedings were initiated by WADA’s Laboratory Expert Group (LabEG) and subsequently carried out by an independent Disciplinary Committee, which was mandated to make a recommendation to the Chair of the WADA Executive Committee regarding the status of the laboratory’s accreditation. This process is now complete.

The suspension, which took effect on 20 August 2019, prohibits the NDTL from carrying out any anti-doping activities, including all analyses of urine and blood samples. During the period of suspension, samples that have not yet been analyzed by the NDTL; samples currently undergoing a confirmation procedure; and any samples for which an Adverse Analytical Finding has been reported, must be securely transported to another WADA-accredited laboratory. This is in order to ensure continued high-quality sample analysis, which also helps preserve athletes’ confidence in this process and the wider anti-doping system.

Pursuant to Article 13.7 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the laboratory may appeal this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days of receipt of notice.

During the period of suspension, the laboratory shall address all non-conformities identified by the LabEG or WADA in any request for corrective action or otherwise, as well as any additional non-conformities identified during any follow up WADA site visit during the suspension period. If the laboratory satisfies the LabEG in meeting these requirements, it may apply for reinstatement prior to the expiry of the six-month suspension period. Should the laboratory not address the non-conformities by the end of the six-month suspension period, WADA may extend the suspension of the laboratory’s accreditation for up to an additional six months.

In accordance with the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).


16/08/19 WADA TO DELIVER INDEPENDENT OBSERVER AND ATHLETE OUTREACH PROGRAMS AT THE 2019 AFRICAN GAMES

Montreal, 15 August 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to outline its planned Independent Observer (IO) and Athlete Outreach (AO) programs for the 12th African Games, taking place from 19 to 31 August 2019 in Rabat, Morocco. The Games will involve almost 7,000 athletes from 54 African countries competing in 26 sports.

The IO and AO teams (listed below) will be active during the African Games and, respectively, will provide real-time expert advice to organizers on all matters relating to the doping control program in place, and will give athletes and their supporting teams the opportunity to learn more about anti-doping and how the anti-doping community works to protect clean sport.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The African Games are another important event on this year’s sporting calendar as we inch closer to the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020. WADA is pleased that an Independent Observer team will be present in Rabat, working alongside the African Games’ doping control team and organizers, to assess every aspect of the anti-doping program in place for the benefit of clean athletes.

“We also welcome the opportunity for a dynamic WADA outreach team to be on hand to engage and educate participating athletes and their support personnel about anti-doping and the importance of instilling clean sport values within the larger sporting community. These are key priorities for WADA and I wish to thank the Association of National Olympic Committees of Africa (ANOCA) and the African Games’ organizing committee for their ongoing support in helping us to execute these programs on the ground.”

WADA’s IO team, which is composed of international experts in anti-doping, is intended to instill confidence in athletes and other stakeholders as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of anti-doping programs being carried out at major events around the world.

The IO team will observe all aspects of the African Games’ anti-doping program, including:

  • Test distribution planning
  • Selection of competitors for testing
  • Notification of doping control
  • Sample collection procedures
  • Therapeutic Use Exemption procedures
  • Results management

The team will provide daily feedback to ANOCA and the African Games Organization Committee of Rabat 2019 (RAGOC). The team will then issue a post-event report that will include a series of observations and recommendations designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future African Games.

A WADA AO team will also be present to provide an opportunity for all competitors to engage with anti-doping in an informal and fun environment. The AO team, which will be staffed by anti-doping experts from across the African continent, will be active in the athletes’ village during the first week of the Games. The aim of the team is to raise awareness among athletes, support personnel and others as to the dangers and consequences of doping and as it relates to athletes’ rights and responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code.

Visitors to the AO booth will be encouraged to complete the Play True Quiz, which is now available in 43 languages, to sign a pledge explaining why they Play True, and to share their experience on social media using the hashtag #PlayTrue.

THE IO AND AO TEAM MEMBERS

The IO Team

  • Sophie Berwick (IO Chair), Anti-Doping Consultant
  • Sameh Elray (Team Manager), WADA
  • Dr. Elske Schabort, South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS)
  • Issoufou Aliou, African Regional Anti-Doping Organization (RADO) Zone II and III

The AO Team

  • Anica Manuel Joao Neto Troso, RADO Zone VI
  • Jason Hilton Snyders, RADO Zone VI
  • Mohamed Habib Zaoui, RADO Zone I
  • Nathalie Bashala, WADA
  • Prince Addo Osei, RADO Zone VI
  • Stacy Spletzer-Jegen, WADA

15/08/19 REMINDER: WADA DEADLINE TO REGISTER FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT IS 30 AUGUST

Montreal, 15 August 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind you that 30 August 2019 is the deadline to register for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, whichwill take place from 5-7 November in Katowice, Poland. Stakeholders are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the deadline, as delegate status cannot be guaranteed once it has passed.

The Agency also wishes to remind you that 1 September is the deadline to book accommodation at the preferential rate negotiated for Conference participants. As the number of hotel rooms in Katowice is limited, we strongly encourage you to book your accommodation as soon as possible.

The Conference, which is being organized with the generous support of the Polish Ministry of Sport and Tourism, will convene global anti-doping stakeholders to take stock of the evolution of clean sport and engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program. The Conference will culminate with endorsement of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards, which will take effect on 1 January 2021; as well as, the election of the new WADA President and Vice-President – who will assume their roles on 1 January 2020.

For further information regarding the Conference, and to register by the deadline of 30 August, please consult the Conference website that contains all relevant information, including: theprogram; the goals and objectivesintervention registration and submissionparticipation terms; and a preliminary list of confirmed speakers, which includes the following individuals, among others:

  • Andrzej Duda, President of the Republic of Poland
  • Thomas Bach, President, International Olympic Committee
  • Witold Bańka, Incoming WADA President
  • Jean-Paul Costa, President, International Institute of Human Rights
  • Ulrich Haas, Professor of Procedural and Private Law, University of Zurich
  • Yang Yang, Incoming WADA Vice-President
  • Richard Young, Attorney and main drafter of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code

Should you have any questions regarding the Conference, including queries relating to registration, accommodation and transport, please consult the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


05/08/19 WADA LIFTS PARTIAL SUSPENSION OF STOCKHOLM LABORATORY’S ACCREDITATION FOR A SPECIFIC ANALYTICAL METHOD

Montreal, 5 August 2019 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that, in accordance with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), Sir Craig Reedie, Chairman of WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), has approved lifting the partial suspension of the accreditation of the Doping Control Laboratory at the Karolinska University Hospital (Stockholm Laboratory) as it relates to the gas chromatography / combustion / isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) method.

The Stockholm Laboratory, which had its accreditation partially suspended for the GC/C/IRMS method on 1 August 2018, has resolved the issue that led to the partial suspension. As such, on 29 July 2019, the WADA Laboratory Expert Group recommended to the Agency’s ExCo Chairman that the partial suspension be lifted. Therefore, effective 1 August 2019, the Stockholm Laboratory, which had continued to carry out all of its other regular anti-doping activities, is no longer required to securely transport samples that require GC/C/IRMS analysis to another WADA-accredited laboratory.

“WADA is pleased to confirm that the Stockholm Laboratory’s accreditation has been reinstated twelve months after the Laboratory was partially suspended,” said WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli. “We commend the Stockholm Laboratory for their comprehensive response in addressing the issue that led to the partial suspension; and, assure athletes that they can be confident that the Laboratory is operating at the high standards required by WADA and the global anti-doping program.”

WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. When a laboratory does not meet ISL requirements, WADA may decide to suspend or revoke the laboratory’s accreditation. This monitoring role is conducted in conjunction with ISO/IEC 17025 assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC).

The full list of accredited laboratories can be found on WADA’s website.


01/08/19 WADA PUBLISHES FIRST LIST OF CONFIRMED SPEAKERS FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 1 August 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish a first list of confirmed speakers for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport to be held from 5-7 November 2019in Katowice, Polandwhich includes the following individuals:

  • Andrzej Duda, President of the Republic of Poland
  • Thomas Bach, President, International Olympic Committee
  • Witold Bańka, President-Elect, WADA
  • Jean-Paul Costa, President, International Institute of Human Rights
  • Ulrich Haas, Professor of Procedural and Private Law, University of Zurich
  • Yang Yang, Vice-President-Elect, WADA
  • Richard Young, Attorney and main drafter of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code

The Conference will convene global anti-doping stakeholders to take stock of the evolution of Clean Sport; engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program; and, wrap up with endorsement of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards that will take effect on 1 January 2021; as well as the election of a new WADA President and Vice President that will assume their roles on 1 January 2020.

The final list of speakers will include representatives and experts from the global anti-doping community including athletes, Anti-Doping Organizations, legal professionals, scientists, law enforcement officials, former WADA Presidents, and others.

For the evolving list of speakers, along with their biographies and scheduled presentations, please consult the Speakers/Presenters section of the Conference website. 

If you are not already registered for the Conference and wish to attend, please register on the Conference website no later than 30 August 2019. The website contains all relevant information regarding the Conference, including the program, goals and objectives, intervention registration and submission, as well as participation terms.

For any other questions regarding the Conference, please refer to the list of key contacts on the website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


30/07/19 WADA INDEPENDENT OBSERVER AND ATHLETE OUTREACH PROGRAMS IN ACTION AT LIMA 2019 GAMES

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to outline its Independent Observer (IO) and Athlete Outreach (AO) programs at the Lima 2019 Pan American (Pan Am) Games, which run from 26 July to 11 August; and, the Parapan American (Parapan Am) Games, to be held from 23 August to 1 September 2019.

The IO and AO teams (listed below) will be active throughout the Pan Am Games and, respectively, are providing real-time expert advice to organizers on all matters relating to the doping control program in place, and giving athletes and their supporting teams the opportunity to learn more about anti-doping and how the anti-doping community works to protect clean sport. The AO Team will also be staying on throughout the Parapan Am Games in order to conduct their activities with para-athletes and their support teams as well.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The Pan American Games are an important event on the sporting calendar with almost 7,000 athletes from 41 American countries competing in 39 sports. In the lead-up to the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games, it is especially important for our experienced team of observers to be present as many of the Pan Am events are qualifiers for the Olympic Games.

“In addition to our IO team, a dynamic WADA Athlete Outreach team is also on hand to provide an opportunity for all competitors to engage with anti-doping in an informal and fun environment. Raising anti-doping awareness with the world’s competing athletes and their support personnel, reminding them of clean sport values and asking them to reflect on all the reasons why they choose to play true is a critical task for the anti-doping community, and I wish to thank Pan Am Sports and the Games’ organizing committee for partnering with WADA on such an important occasion.”

WADA’s IO team, which is composed of international experts in anti-doping, is intended to instill confidence in athletes and other stakeholders as to the quality, effectiveness and reliability of anti-doping programs being carried out at major events around the world.

The IO team is observing all aspects of the Pan Am Games’ anti-doping program, including:

  • Test distribution planning
  • Selection of competitors for testing
  • Notification of doping control
  • Sample collection procedures
  • Therapeutic Use Exemption procedures
  • Results management

The team is providing daily feedback to Pan Am Sports as well as the Lima 2019 Organizing Committee. The team will then issue a post-event report that will include a series of observations and recommendations designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future Pan Am Games.

WADA’s AO team, which is staffed by anti-doping experts from across the Americas, is active in the athletes’ village during the Pan Am Games and will be active during the Parapan Am Games as well. The aim of the team is to build awareness among athletes, support personnel and others as to the dangers and consequences of doping and as it relates to athletes’ rights and responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code.

Visitors to the AO booth are encouraged to complete the Play True Quiz, which is now available in 43 languages, to sign a pledge explaining why they Play True, and to share their experience on social media using the hashtag #PlayTrue.

Beyond WADA’s IO and AO activities during the Lima 2019 Games, in connection with the mandate of WADA’s Prevalence Working Group, WADA and Pan Am Sports have an agreement to carry out a pilot study during the Games. Specifically, the study seeks to validate a survey method among athletes during the Games with the objective of developing a tool or set of tools to estimate the prevalence of doping in sports and countries; and, to enable measurement of the impact of anti-doping policies and actions on the prevalence of doping over time.

THE IO AND AO TEAM MEMBERS

The IO Team – Pan Am Games

  • Ilaria Baudo (Chair), WADA
  • Juan Manuel Lauria (Team Manager), WADA
  • Saul Salcedo, National Anti-Doping Organization of Panama
  • Andrés Gonzalez, National Anti-Doping Organization of Chile

The AO Team – Pan Am Games

  • Stacy Spletzer-Jegen (Team Manager), WADA
  • Edna Serra, WADA

Phase 1:

  • Patricia Esposito, National Anti-Doping Organization of Guatemala
  • Patrick Werleman, National Olympic Committee of Aruba
  • Carolina Joly, IOC Youth Change Maker, National Olympic Committee of Panama

Phase 2:

  • Jorge Laurence, National Anti-Doping Organization of Argentina
  • Paulina de la Loza, National Anti-Doping Organization of Mexico
  • Christopher Thompson, Bahamas Anti-Doping Commission

The AO Team – Parapan Am Games

  • Edna Serra (Team Manager), WADA
  • Elizabeth Gimenez, National Anti-Doping Organization of Paraguay
  • Cathlyn Pistolas, United States Anti-Doping Agency
  • Adriana Taboza, National Anti-Doping Organization of Brazil

15/07/19 WADA PUBLISHES LATEST DRAFT VERSIONS OF THE 2021 CODE AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Dear Colleagues, 

On 12 December 20174 June 2018 and 10 December 2018 respectively, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) launched the three phases of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code Review Process(2021 Code Review Process), which also involves review of the International Standards (Standards).

Today, the Agency is pleased to publish:

I. The third draft of the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) 
II. The second drafts of the International Standards (where applicable)
III. The revised Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights (Charter)

These updated versions of the Code, Standards and Charter follow careful consideration of all recommendations and feedback received during the three phases of the 2021 Code Review Process, which came to an end on 4 March 2019. They were submitted to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) and Foundation Board (Board) at their respective meetings on 15 and 16 May 2019.

The whole review process will culminate with approval of the final drafts at WADA’s next World Conference on Doping in Sport, which is to be held in Katowice, Poland in November 2019; after which, the revised 2021 Code and Standards will take effect on 1 January 2021.

I. CODE

Following the third phase of stakeholder consultation on the 2021 Code, the Agency is pleased to publish:The third draft of the Code following the third review phaseTwo Redline versions of the Code (third draft v second draft and third draft v current Code)The Summary of major proposed changes following the third consultation phaseThe Comments received from stakeholders during the third consultation phaseThe Comments received on the Code, Standards and Charter from the Olympic Movementduring the third consultation phaseII. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

Following the second phase of stakeholder consultation on the Standards, the Agency is pleased to publish:

1.  The International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase2.  The International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories (ISCCS)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase3.  The International Standard for Education (ISE)Clean version of the third draftRedline version (third draft v second draft)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase4.  The International Standard for Results Management (ISRM). This Standard is currently undergoing a second consultation phase following the presentation of the second draft at the May 2019 ExCo meeting. The most recent documents are listed below:Clean version of the second draftRedline version (second draft v first draft)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the first consultation phase5. The International Standard for the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information (ISPPPI)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase6.  The International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI)Clean version of the second draftRedline versions (second draft v first draft and second draft v current Standard)Summary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders during the second consultation phase7.  The International Standard for Laboratories (ISL). This version (10.0) of the Standard was approved at WADA’s May 2019 Board meeting, following a third phase of consultation requested by the WADA ExCo in November 2018. The consultation phase ran from 10 December 2018 to 4 March 2019 along with the other Standards. Version 10.0 will come into force on 1 November 2019 but will undergo further revision in 2020 to bring it in line with the 2021 Code. As such, a consultation phase will take place from December 2019 to March 2020. The most recent documents are listed below:  Clean version (10.0)Redline version (current version 10.0 v November 2018 version 10.0)Summary of major changesComments received from stakeholders during the third consultation phase8.  The International Standard for the Prohibited List is not part of the review process as it is reviewed annually via a separate stakeholder consultation.

[Note: At this point, the Code and Standard documents are available in English only.]

III.  ANTI-DOPING CHARTER OF ATHLETE RIGHTS

Following the first and only round of stakeholder consultation of the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights, which is being developed by WADA’s Athlete Committee, the Agency is pleased to publish: Clean version of the second draft Redline versionSummary of major proposed changesComments received from stakeholders [Note: The second draft of the Charter is also available in French and Spanish.]

WADA would like to thank all stakeholders for their feedback during the 2021 Code Review Process. The high quality of stakeholder feedback that was collected during the Review was instrumental to ensuring that the Code and Standards be further strengthened in protection of clean sport.

The Agency also wishes to advise stakeholders that while the official consultation phases are now over – with the exception of the ISRM (which is currently undergoing a second consultation phase) and the ISL (which will undergo further revision and stakeholder consultation as explained above) – the drafting teams will continue to accept comments and/or feedback from stakeholders to ensure that the 2021 Code and Standards, which will be further discussed by WADA’s ExCo at its last meeting before the World Conference (on 23 September in Tokyo) are as robust and comprehensive as possible.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


12/07/19 WADA’S 2018 TESTING FIGURES REPORT: FOR ADO REVIEW

Dear Colleagues,

Article 14.5 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) stipulates that the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) shall act as a central clearinghouse for Doping Control Testing data and results. Accordingly, on an annual basis, the Agency publishes reports which consolidate data that have been reported by WADA-accredited laboratories via the Agency’s Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS).

Today, we are pleased to provide WADA’s 2018 Testing Figures Report, which is broken down into the following four sub-reports. They represent analyses conducted by the WADA-accredited laboratories in 2018, in- and out-of-competition, for urine, blood and the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP).

The sub-reports are:Laboratory reportSport reportTesting Authority reportABP (blood analysis)WADA is providing you, Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs), with these reports in advance of their public distribution, inviting you to review your respective testing data and verify the data via ADAMS. We would ask you to provide comments no later than 26 July 2019 via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online consultation platform. Easy to use, WADAConnect will prompt you to create a user account and input your comments.

[For further information related to WADAConnect, please refer to the simple user guide.]

Furthermore, and in order to facilitate this process, the Agency would encourage you to refer to the Reporting Guide to Monitor Testing, which will guide you in compiling and verifying your respective results in ADAMS, including the Adverse Analytical Findings (AAFs) and Atypical Findings (ATFs) related to samples from your testing programs.

Should you have any questions regarding the Testing Figures Report, please contact statistics@wada-ama.org.

We thank you in advance for your cooperation and remain available to respond to any questions that you may have in this regard.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


10/07/19 WADA PUBLISHES 2018 MONITORING PROGRAM FIGURES

Dear Colleagues,

Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the 2018 Monitoring Program Figures, which provides data for substances by sport which were not on the 2018 Prohibited List but that were monitored during 2018 in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport; and, potential inclusion on the Prohibited List.

Article 4.5 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) states that “WADA, in consultation with signatories [of the Code] and governments, shall establish a monitoring program regarding substances which are not on the Prohibited List, but which WADA wishes to monitor in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport. […] WADA shall make available to International Federations and National Anti-Doping Organizations, on at least an annual basis, aggregate statistical information by sport regarding the additional substances.”

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


09/07/19 WADA HIGHLIGHTS PROCESS FOR REGISTERING AND SUBMITTING INTERVENTIONS FOR THE WORLD CONFERENCE

Dear Colleagues,

On 21 March, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) opened registration for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport, which will take place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland. Today, WADA is pleased to highlight the process for registering and submitting interventions for the World Conference.

Just as the entire 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Review Process has been open and collaborative, it is important that WADA affords delegates the opportunity to intervene publicly during the Conference Plenary Sessions related to the Code.

Please note that only delegates can publicly intervene; and that, priority will be given to those that register to intervene prior to the Conference. Due to the high number of interventions expected, they will be limited to three minutes each. In the event that more intervention requests are received than available slots, WADA will be required to prioritize the interventions and/or possibly shorten the time offered.

For delegates:

  1. To register interventions

Delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Plenary Sessions (related to the Code) should register their interest via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 4 October 2019.

The same process applies to delegates who wish to make an intervention during the Side Sessions of the Conference where the focus will be on the various International Standards and the Anti-Doping Charter of Athlete Rights.

  1. To submit interventions

Delegates who wish to make an intervention in Katowice are strongly encouraged to provide an advance copy of their written document in English and/or French via e-mail to: worldconference2019@wada-ama.orgby 21 October 2019.

Written documents should be a maximum of two A4 (or letter size) pages in length (approximately 400-500 words).

All documents will be posted on the Conference website as soon as possible after the relevant session.

For non-delegate participants:

While non-delegate participants are welcome to submit a written contribution (via e-mail to worldconference2019@wada-ama.org), the Agency will not be able to accommodate these submissions with an intervention slot during the Conference Plenary Sessions.

Subject to available time, non-delegate participants may be able to deliver an intervention during the Conference Side Sessions. It is intended that non-delegate submissions will also be posted on the Conference website after the relevant session, regardless whether an intervention slot was afforded or not.

Please note that the full intervention registration and submission process can be found on the World Conference website.

Should you have any questions regarding the intervention process, or general inquiries regarding the event, please refer to the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


05/06/19 WADA PUBLISHES OFFICIAL PROGRAM FOR FIFTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON DOPING IN SPORT

Dear Colleagues,

Further to our communication of 21 March, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to publish the official Conference Program including session descriptions, for the Agency’s Fifth World Conference on Doping in Sport that will take place from 5-7 November 2019 in Katowice, Poland. Registration for the event is already open.

Organized with the generous support of the Ministry of Sport and Tourism of the Republic of Poland, the Conference is set to convene representatives from the sport movement, public authorities and anti-doping organizations, along with athletes, other anti-doping experts and members of the media to take stock of the evolution of Clean Sport and engage in high-level discussion and debate about the global anti-doping program.

This year’s World Conference will focus on the 2021 World Anti-Doping Code (Code) review and will culminate with presentation and endorsement of the proposed Code and International Standards. The Conference will conclude with the election by WADA’s Foundation Board of the new WADA President and Vice President that will assume their new roles on 1 January 2020.

Should you wish to register for the World Conference, please do so on the Conference website no later than 30 August 2019. The website contains all relevant information regarding the event, including the Conference’s program; goals and objectives; intervention registration and submission; as well as, participation terms.

Should you have any questions regarding the event, please refer to the list of key contacts on the Conference website.

We look forward to welcoming you all in Katowice.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


29/05/19 WADA LAUNCHES ALPHA 2.0 ANTI-DOPING eLEARNING COURSE FOR ATHLETES

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to launch an updated version of the Athlete Learning Program about Health and Anti-Doping (ALPHA) course on its Anti-Doping e-Learning Platform (ADeL).

Initially launched in 2014 – and developed with the help of athletes, leading psychologists, behavioral scientists, education technologists, e-learning specialists and prevention specialists – ALPHA represents a holistic, values-based approach and offers a pragmatic and positive alternative to the traditional approach to the prevention of doping. The course has already been successfully completed by over 22,500 of ADeL’s 35,000 subscribers.

The new ALPHA 2.0 preserves the course’s original content but adopts a fresh new look and feel, along with improved interactive activities. The updated course also includes athlete testimonial videos, which provide a point of reference and are proven to be an effective means of peer learning. The course is initially being launched in English with the other 5 ALPHA languages (French, Croatian, Japanese, Spanish and Slovenian) to follow this year. ALPHA 1.0 remains available for everyone in all languages.

The updated ALPHA 2.0 has been broken down into eight digestible lessons, taking approximately 10 minutes to complete each one. The course aims to improve retention and meet the needs of the modern learner for bite-size courses. ALPHA 2.0 is also mobile-friendly so athletes will be able to easily access the course through their smart phones or tablets.

The course’s first six lessons address the World Anti-Doping Code’s requirement for athletes to be educated on the following:

Doping control
Whereabouts
Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs)
Results management processes
Medical reasons not to dope, and
Ethical reasons not to dope

Lessons seven and eight offer practical help on how to stay clean and how to resist the pressure to dope, which encourages athletes to develop positive and proactive plans to avoid doping in a way that is particularly meaningful for them.

The end of the course features The Play True Pledge, which allows athletes to demonstrate publicly their commitment to clean sport by sharing The Pledge on their social media accounts. There is also a post-course test to assess the knowledge of the athletes – a score of 80% or higher is required for certification.

To access the ALPHA 2.0 course, simply register on ADeL or log in to your existing account. If you register as an athlete, ALPHA 2.0 will be featured automatically on your home page. For other roles, you can find the course in the Library section. In order to help users navigate through the platform, WADA has also created an ADeL User Guide, which should help users fully benefit from the ADeL platform.

For any questions or to provide feedback on ALPHA 2.0 or other ADeL resources, please direct your emails to adel@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


06/05/19 2020 WADA PROHIBITED LIST: STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION

Montreal, 1 May 2019

Dear Colleagues,

Annually, there is an agreed process for reviewing content and structural changes to the List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (Prohibited List), which is an International Standard under Article 4.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

As part of this process, stakeholder feedback is collected throughout the year; and then, in April of every year, WADA’s List Expert Group meets to discuss the feedback, evidence and proposed content and/or structural changes, and to formulate the draft Prohibited List.

On 11 and 12 April, the List Expert Group held a meeting that resulted in the following documents, which we are confidentially giving you access to today for Stakeholder Consultation, via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online stakeholder consultation platform:

Draft 2020 Prohibited List
Summary of Modifications, which is intended to facilitate your review
2020 Monitoring Program

As is customary, WADA kindly asks that someone within your organization, with the relevant professional experience and expertise in anti-doping, be given the opportunity to carefully review the draft 2020 Prohibited List and provide comments concerning the proposed content (additions, subtractions or other modifications) and/or structural changes. We would ask that, whenever possible, your comments be supported by relevant reference(s) to medical or scientific evidence; pharmacological effect; and/or, personal experience concerning the substances or methods in question.

Also, as was done last year, the WADAConnect platform will encourage you, separately, to propose further additions, subtractions or other modifications under ‘Comments for future consideration’; which will be evaluated and considered carefully over the course of the year but will not likely be incorporated within the 2020 Prohibited List.

To provide comments

Simply connect to WADAConnect. If you do not currently have access, please consult the short guide on how to create a user account that is available on the platform.
Once you have a user account, please inform violet.maziar@wada-ama.org and ask to be added to the private List Consultation Group. This is necessary in order to provide comments.
Please input your comments by 12 July 2019.

We believe that conducting this Stakeholder Consultation helps ensure that the Prohibited List evolves in step with the highest possible scientific standards; and, reflects the needs of the anti-doping community.

In keeping with the annual process, the 2020 Prohibited List will not be made public until 1 October 2019. Therefore, we would ask you to ensure that the draft is kept confidential in order to preserve the integrity of the Stakeholder Consultation process. As we know, earlier publication would compromise the process and lead to confusion in the minds of athletes and other stakeholders worldwide.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact violet.maziar@wada-ama.org.

Thank you in advance for your organization’s feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


06/05/19 WADA APPOINTS AMANDA HUDSON AS DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Amanda Hudson as WADA’s new Director of Education, effective 5 August 2019.

Ms. Hudson, who is currently Head of Education for UK Anti-Doping in London, will lead the development and implementation of WADA’s education strategy, programs and activities, including managing WADA’s Social Science Research Grant Program and the Agency’s Education Committee.

In October 2018, Director of Communications, Catherine MacLean, assumed leadership of the education portfolio and set out to recruit a Deputy Director of Education to help develop and drive WADA’s education strategy. Due to the quality of the applications received during the recruitment phase, management decided to upgrade the role to Director, carving education out as a stand-alone department with a seat at the management table. This optimized structure reflects the increasing importance with which WADA and its stakeholders view the areas of both education and communications to the Agency and the global anti-doping program.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “I am delighted that Amanda will be joining WADA to take on this important mandate as the Director of Education. With almost 15 years connected to sport, nine of which with UKAD, Amanda brings with her a wealth of experience in developing and delivering excellent anti-doping education programs. Her strategic approach and leadership are exactly what we need to bring this core business activity to the next level.

“WADA’s success depends on its 100+ team of committed and skilled individuals. This appointment will reinforce WADA’s Management Team and will help the Agency deliver on its mission for athletes and other stakeholders in 2019 and beyond.”

Amanda Hudson will be located at WADA’s head office in Montreal, Canada. Until Ms. Hudson’s arrival in August, Ms. MacLean will maintain leadership of Education in addition to Communications.


01/05/19 WADA SUCCESSFULLY RETRIEVES SAMPLES FROM MOSCOW LABORATORY

Montreal, 30 April 2019 – Since January’s retrieval by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) of the analytical data generated by the former Moscow Laboratory in Russia, WADA Intelligence and Investigations (I&I) has been working on a mission to extract all relevant samples still contained within the laboratory.

WADA can confirm that a five-person team has successfully retrieved 2,262 samples from the laboratory, which had been split into A and B samples and contained within 4,524 collection bottles. The samples have now been taken out of Moscow and are on their way to a WADA-accredited laboratory outside of Russia. Importantly, all samples targeted by I&I in advance of the mission were successfully located and extracted.

WADA Director of I&I Gunter Younger, who is leading the process, said: “WADA Intelligence and Investigations is pleased to be continuing to make progress in this complex and difficult case. Extracting the required samples from the laboratory is another step forward. These samples will be used to strengthen cases against those who may have cheated and may exonerate athletes who have not committed an anti-doping rule violation.”

“In removing the bottles, as a precaution we decided to take any and all samples that corresponded to data in the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) database that was even remotely anomalous, even where an anti-doping rule violation (ADRV) was not suspected. We can therefore proceed to the next phase and support the various International Federations (IFs) and other Anti-Doping Organizations to bring cases forward.”

In parallel, the authentication process of the Moscow data is close to completion. In early May, a progress report from that process will be sent to the independent Compliance Review Committee – which has received updates from WADA I&I every two weeks since the data was extracted in January – and an update will be presented at the next meetings of WADA’s Executive Committee and Foundation Board on 15 and 16 May, respectively.

Meanwhile, the process continues as I&I investigators identify all available evidence for each case, including ordering further sample analysis, where appropriate. In due course, the relevant IFs will be presented with evidentiary packages, which they will assess with the view to taking the cases forward as ADRVs. In cases where IFs choose not to take action, WADA will review the facts, discuss with the relevant IF and reserves the right to bring them forward to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Last week, WADA held a conference call with a number of IFs outlining the next steps and answering any questions they might have. Similar conference calls have also been held with athletes and with National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs).

Background: The successful data and sample retrieval came about as a result of the 20 September 2018 decision of WADA’s Executive Committee to reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA), under strict conditions, to the list of World Anti-Doping Code-compliant Signatories. Under the terms of that decision, the Russian authorities were required to provide the data while also agreeing that any samples required by WADA for re-analysis would be made available by 30 June 2019. The samples had been stored and sealed off as part of a federal investigation being carried out by Russian authorities.

Further information: WADA has produced a flowchart that summarizes the three phases of the RUSADA Compliance Process and has compiled a document that summarizes the ‘Progress of the Anti-Doping System in Light of the Russian Doping Crisis’.


30/04/19 WADA LAUNCHES THERAPEUTIC USE EXEMPTION CHECKLISTS

Montreal, 29 April 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to launch a series of Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) Checklists to provide guidance and support to athletes, their physicians and Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) during the TUE application process.

These new Checklists are based on the TUE Committee Guidelines (TUEC Guidelines) (Medical Information to Support the Decisions of TUECs documents); which were developed by WADA and external medical specialists primarily for TUECs. The Checklists – which cover the most commonly seen conditions – list the requirements for completing the TUE Application Form, including the medical evidence that must be submitted along with it.

Following a successful pilot project with a number of National Anti-Doping Organizations and International Federations over the last few months, we now invite all ADOs to use the Checklists in their interactions with athletes and applying physicians. We also invite stakeholders to adapt the official English versions by translating and customizing them as necessary – while ensuring that the key elements remain.

ADOs interested in making their translations available on WADA’s website are strongly encouraged to do so and to send their translations to medical@wada-ama.org by 17 May 2019. We will be posting all TUE checklists on the WADA website after this date.

We thank you in advance for your efforts and collaboration in adopting these Checklists. Should you have any questions or wish to provide feedback, please contact medical@wada-ama.org.


25/04/19 WADA WELCOMES SIGNIFICANT DECISION BY COURT OF ARBITRATION FOR SPORT

Montreal, 24 April 2019 – A newly developed method for detecting the use of prohibited substances in athletes has led to a significant and unprecedented 29 March 2019 decision by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in favour of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

CAS issued a final award confirming Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs) in the cases of the Ukrainian track and field athletes, Olesia Povh and Olha Zemliak. Both athletes were convicted of using a prohibited substance based on the detection of non-physiological levels of testosterone in their blood serum samples following analysis in the WADA-accredited laboratories in Lausanne, Switzerland, and Seibersdorf, Austria.

The testing was initiated by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). This led to the subsequent investigation, which resulted in these important convictions. The measurement of testosterone levels in blood serum constitutes a further tool for Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) to detect and prosecute doping, even where urine samples might be reported as negative.

WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA welcomes this decision by CAS, which could have a long-term positive impact on clean sport. I would also like to commend the AIU for their excellent work which led to this outcome. The decision sets an important precedent and this new method of detecting doping represents another way for ADOs to secure Anti-Doping Rule Violations against those who choose to cheat. It is a significant victory for clean sport and for athletes around the world.”

Significantly, CAS ruled that there could be no doubt on the evidence that the method used in measuring testosterone in blood serum was scientifically valid, paving the way for further examples of this method being used in the future.

Olesia Povh was sanctioned with a four-year period of ineligibility for intentional doping while Olha Zemliak received an eight-year period of ineligibility as it was her second violation.


07/04/19 WADA HAILS 30th ANNIVERSARY OF COUNCIL OF EUROPE ANTI-DOPING CONVENTION

Athens, 5 April 2019 – Yesterday, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) Director General, Olivier Niggli, addressed a two-day conference in Athens, Greece, being held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Council of Europe’s Anti-Doping Convention (Convention).

This year marks three decades since the Convention was open for signature – a treaty that has now been ratified by all 47 Council of Europe member countries and several other states. Arriving 10 years before WADA was formed, the Convention helped to prepare the way for the Agency’s work by standardizing and harmonizing measures to tackle doping across all boundaries.

Olivier Niggli told the conference that while the success of the Convention and many other measures in protecting clean sport were clear, now was not the time for complacency.

“Without a doubt there is much more work to be done and improvements to be made,” he said. “The fight against doping is not static. It evolves every day and none of us should rest on our laurels. Together, the Council of Europe, Member States, WADA, UNESCO, the Sport Movement and all other players within the anti-doping community must go further by improving our methods, our rules, our science, our monitoring, our education programs, our investigative capabilities and much more.

“The input of governments, such as those represented at this important conference, is paramount to going further and making a difference. We need them as a crucial part of the team. The athletes make all of us proud every day through their hard efforts, their excellence and their dedication. They act as role models for the youth and make their nations’ flags fly on the world stage. We owe them our full commitment – to protect them and the sports they love.

“Over the years, WADA has been working very closely with the Council of Europe on a range of issues, including matters related to monitoring the compliance of anti-doping programs. This partnership has allowed for a crossover of important expertise, which benefits both organizations in increasing their respective efficiency while avoiding duplication of resources.

“On behalf of WADA, I wish to thank Europe for their commitment, their investment and their relentless efforts in protecting clean sport and society.”


03/04/19 WADA INVITES STAKEHOLDERS TO CELEBRATE “PLAY TRUE DAY” ON 10 APRIL

Montreal, 2 April 2019

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites all of its stakeholders to join WADA in celebrating ‘Play True Day’ on 10 April along with fellow athletes, National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, Sports Federations, Major Event Organizers and other anti-doping stakeholders from around the world.

‘Play True Day’ is dedicated to clean sport and is intended to raise awareness among athletes, the sporting public and others about the global fight against doping. The inspiration for this initiative stems from a WADA-hosted Education Conference in 2013, which was attended by 17 South American countries that were the driving force behind 10 April being declared ‘Play True Day’. While it started as a small South American initiative, over the years, this grassroots movement has gained momentum with numerous organizations and countries from across the globe taking part.

In a spirit of solidarity among the anti-doping community, we invite you to join WADA and others by celebrating ‘Play True Day’ on your digital and social media platforms using one of the branded frames WADA has created especially for the day. Alternatively, you may wish to innovate and create your own Play True Day frame with a unique twist based on your specific sport or country. We also invite you all to use the hashtag #PlayTrueDay both in the leadup to and on the day in order to maximize the impact of the event on social media.

Also, should you have any queries or events/videos etc. that you would like to promote, please visit the Play True Day Website, or feel free to contact Nina Makuc from the Slovenian NADO at nina.makuc@sloado.si, who has been a true champion of the cause.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency