RaceRunning

Now an World Para Athletics Event

A CPISRA Developed Sport.

Introduction to RaceRunning

RaceRunning is an international disability sport in which children and adults compete with running bikes on an athletics track. Events range from 40m to 3000m. Competitors are classified based on their disability and race against other competitors in their class.

What is a Running Bike and who can use it?

A Running Bike is a three wheeled bike with no pedals which supports you as you walk or run. Running Bikes are used by people of all ages for recreation and sport at a variety of levels. A Running Bike is a very effective way of improving overall fitness, strength and well-being. Despite considerable physical challenges, most users are able to use the Running Bike to propel themselves considerably faster than they can unassisted. The bike can be used by children from 3-4 years through to adulthood. It is predominantly suitable for those with Cerebral Palsy, although it is also suitable for those with Muscular Dystrophy, Parkinsons Disease and other disabilities that affect mobility and balance. The low centre of gravity and frame design offers good stability and poise whilst running or walking. The saddle unit counter-acts lateral sway and also can be used as a seat when resting. The Running Bike rolls so freely that even children and adults who have been restricted to power wheelchairs have now found a way propelling themselves by their own efforts.

History

Under Development

Benefits

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FAQ

Under Developmenttesting et

World Para Athletics : RACERUNNING

 

World Para Athletics: RACERUNNING announcement

 Photo of the Month

Millie of Scotland’s first race

Latest RaceRunning News

RaceRunning Committee Updates

International Competition Photos

Competition

International RaceRunning Website Results, Rankings & World Records. Provided by Denmark : RaceRunning founder and CPISRA member.

Events

RaceRunning competition is held on an athletics track. Official international events in which Rankings and World Records are administered are; 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m, 1500m and 5000m.

Classification Classes

There are 3 CPISRA International classification classes; RR1, RR2 & RR3. In addition RR4 – is a classification available for those with mobility challenges who do not classify within RR1, RR2 or RR3. RR4 is not a CPISRA international classification, however, national bodies may include RR4 events in their domestic and open competitions.

 

 

A description of each international class follows;

Classification RR1 – severe involvement of LL (legs) and trunk, (significant spasticity) gross patterns of movement only, difficulty in isolating individual joint movements, ineffective leg propulsion, foot drag, severe asymmetry, poor co-ordination, poor trunk control and upper limb involvement, limited hand function requiring hand placement aids, startle reflex.

Classification RR2 – moderate involvement of LL (legs) and trunk (less spasticity), asymmetry but more effective pushing pattern than RR1, may also need gloves to keep hands on handlebars, min or no foot drag, poor co-ordination but can alternate leg movement but limited stride effectiveness, moderate trunk control.

Classification RR3 – mild to moderate involvement of one or both UL, fair to good trunk control, moderate involvement of LL (legs), symmetrical or slight asymmetrical movement of LL (legs), with alternate leg movement and good push off, no startle reflex ie effective start, good acceleration with adequate steering and braking, will not require hand strapping, reduced range of movement at hip and knee joints may limit stride length. Some athletes with Athetosis may demonstrate a smoother movement as their speed increases.

UL refers Upper Limb

CPISRA RaceRunning International Committee

Under Development

How to Start Competing

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Recreation

Forms of Recreation

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FAQ

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Recreation Photos

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