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28/04/2022 – WADA and the Commonwealth Games Federation deliver e-learning course for athletes and coaches ahead of 2022 Commonwealth Games

Montreal, 28 April 2022

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) have joined forces to create and launch a new interactive e-learning education course targeted at athletes and coaches intending to participate in the 2022 Commonwealth Games, which will run from 28 July to 8 August, in Birmingham, England.
 
The course, which is hosted on WADA’s Anti-Doping Education and Learning platform, ADEL, includes modules explaining which substances and methods are prohibited (including recent changes to the status of glucocorticoids), whereabouts information and requirements at the Games, how testing will be carried out, and what to do if an athlete needs to apply for a therapeutic use exemption. The course also outlines the important dates that athletes need to be aware of and which organization has jurisdiction over them during the Games, as well as offering learning activities that allow participants to apply their knowledge.
 
WADA Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “Following on from the successful pre-Olympic and Paralympic courses that we delivered last year, we are excited to launch the latest offering on our ADEL platform. We are confident that athletes and coaches will find the course beneficial as they prepare for this major event. It is important to WADA and the Commonwealth Games Federation that investment is made to ensure that those wishing to participate in the Games are educated in advance.
 
“It is critical now that Governments, Commonwealth Games Associations and all relevant National Sports Federations promote this course and encourage as many athletes and coaches as possible to complete it. I would like to thank our colleagues at the Commonwealth Games Federation for collaborating with us on this important initiative.”
 
CGF Medical Advisor and Anti-Doping Taskforce Co-Chair, Dr. Peter Harcourt, said: “The CGF and the Birmingham 2022 Anti-Doping Taskforce are delighted to collaborate with WADA in the development of this important education resource for all athletes and coaches preparing for Birmingham 2022. It is the first time that a CGF Anti-Doping Taskforce has introduced pre-Games education. We are hoping that the roll-out of this course will ensure that all team members know how to comply with the extensive measures that have been put in place to protect the integrity of the event and to ensure a clean Games.
 
“As well as encouraging their participants to complete the course, the CGF appeals to all Commonwealth Games Associations to work in close collaboration with their National or Regional Anti-Doping Organization and their National Sports Federations to ensure that athletes and coaches are properly educated in advance of travelling to Birmingham.”
 
In January 2020, WADA and the International Olympic Committee also launched the ‘ADeL for Medical Professionals at Major Games’. This course has open access, enabling any medical personnel participating in the Commonwealth Games to undertake this course to assist their preparation.

As it does at many major events, including the Olympic and Paralympic Games, WADA will have in place an Independent Observer team to monitor the delivery of all aspects of the Commonwealth Games’ anti-doping program. In addition, there will be an Athlete Engagement and Outreach team – including members of WADA’s Athlete Committee – present in Birmingham promoting clean sport and engaging competing athletes and other athlete leaders around anti-doping initiatives.


28/03/2022 – Research on prevalence of doping, scientific and education topics among WADA webinars in April

We also take the opportunity to remind stakeholders of the remaining webinar to be held in March:

To register, please simply view the registration instructions in the ‘To Register’ column above.
 
Should you have any questions regarding the above, please contact Ms. Selva Balasingam, WADA Communications Manager, at: selva.balasingam@wada-ama.org.
 
Best regards,
 
World Anti-Doping Agency


15/03/2022 – WADA signs agreement with the Association of South-East Asian Nations to boost anti-doping program development

Montreal, 14 March 2022

Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) to collaborate on a range of anti-doping program development activities. The signing took place during the 17th Asia/Oceania Region Intergovernmental Meeting on Anti-Doping in Sport, hosted in Dubai by the United Arab Emirates National Anti-Doping Organization.
 
Formed in 1967, ASEAN is an intergovernmental organization established by the ASEAN Charter that is committed to intensifying community building through enhanced cooperation and integration by its 10 member states.
 
The MOU, which was signed by WADA President Witold Bańka and ASEAN Secretary-General Dato Lim, will run for an initial term of three years with the objective of creating a partnership that will help both organizations to help prevent doping in the region.
 
WADA President, Witold Bańka, said: “The global anti-doping system relies on collaboration between various stakeholders, and this MOU between WADA and the Association of South-East Asian Nations will boost the anti-doping work being carried out by Governments and National Anti-Doping Organizations in that region. WADA exists to serve the athletes of the world. We are here to provide them with the opportunity to compete to the best of their natural ability on a level playing field. The cooperation formalized by this MOU is another example of the practical steps we are taking to do just that. I thank ASEAN and its members for their commitment to clean sport.”
 
Secretary-General of ASEAN Dato Lim said in his remarks, “I am confident that the engagement of member states and relevant stakeholders in anti-doping prevention will enable ASEAN to better harness the potential of its human resources needed for the prevention of doping in ASEAN, in order to provide a fair and equitable playing environment for all athletes.”

Through the MOU, ASEAN will support the implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), which harmonizes anti-doping programs in all sports and all countries of the world. It will also ensure that its member states do everything possible to further increase anti-doping capacity in the region.
 
ASEAN members also undertake to implement effective anti-doping education and athlete outreach programs, ensure that the necessary legislation and regulation are in place to uphold the terms of the Code, and cooperate with WADA and International Federations on all matters related to the protection of clean sport.
 
For its part, WADA will collaborate with and support ASEAN in common projects for its members. This includes sharing information, education and training resources, ensuring that ASEAN is invited to WADA events, and that it is being kept up to date on all pertinent matters related to anti-doping.
 
In addition to the signing of the MOU, the Asia/Oceania Region Intergovernmental Meeting being held on 14-15 March in Dubai is a chance for representatives of Governments from all over Asia and Oceania to gather again and discuss important anti-doping issues that will help in the protection of clean sport. In all, 34 countries are attending the meeting, either virtually or in person and among the speakers are WADA President Witold Bańka and Vice-President Yang Yang. Mr. Bańka highlighted three important aspects of anti-doping, namely the need for each country of the world to have a robust and relevant program, the importance of appropriate funding being assigned to anti-doping on a global level, and the requirement for meaningful dialogue and engagement with athletes.
 
In her speech, Ms. Yang took the opportunity to focus on the ongoing work to strengthen the quality of education in anti-doping, particularly through WADA’s Anti-Doping Education and Learning platform, known as ADEL. In addition, WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, is attending the meeting and delivered a presentation focusing on the main elements of the Agency’s work in line with its Strategic Plan 2020-2024


12/03/2022 – WADA issues Testing Guidance for Anti-Doping Organizations following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine 

Dear Colleagues,
 
The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) continues to be appalled by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the devastating war that is ongoing.
 
WADA President Witold Bańka said: “WADA is monitoring the horrific situation in Ukraine, which is changing on a daily basis. We are in regular contact with our colleagues from Ukraine’s National Anti-Doping Organization (NADC), which has temporarily halted its operations. The safety of our colleagues at the NADC, as well as all Ukrainian athletes and other citizens, is at the forefront of everyone’s minds. We condemn this act of aggression by Russia and stand in solidarity with the people of Ukraine in these most difficult and dangerous of times.”
 
In order to maintain the integrity of the global anti-doping system as much as possible given the circumstances, today WADA is issuing Testing Guidance for Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs), with specific instructions and advice when it comes to anti-doping in Ukraine, Russia and Belarus.
 
WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “As the global leader of anti-doping, WADA has been contacted by a number of stakeholders seeking guidance on how best to handle the testing of athletes and other aspects of the anti-doping system in Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. This Testing Guidance emphasizes safety for all as our primary concern and provides direction to ensure that disruption to the system is minimized.”
 
WADA will continue to monitor developments and update this Guidance as necessary as the situation evolves.
 
Best regards,
 
World Anti-Doping Agency


14/2/22 WADA statement following CAS decision not to reinstate skater’s provisional suspension

Montreal, 14 February 2022
The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) acknowledges the ruling announced today by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to confirm the lifting of the provisional suspension of Russian Olympic Committee figure skater Kamila Valieva.
 
WADA’s appeal to CAS in this case, which was filed alongside appeals by the International Olympic Committee and the International Skating Union, was based on WADA’s position that the decision by the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) Disciplinary Committee to lift the mandatory provisional suspension on the athlete was not in line with the terms of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code). WADA is therefore disappointed by today’s ruling of the CAS Ad Hoc Division. While WADA has not received the reasoned award, it appears that the CAS panel decided not to apply the terms of the Code, which does not allow for specific exceptions to be made in relation to mandatory provisional suspensions for ‘protected persons’, including minors.
 
Concerning the analysis of the athlete’s sample, WADA always expects Anti-Doping Organizations to liaise with the laboratories in order to ensure they expedite the analysis of samples so that the results are received prior to athletes traveling to or competing in a major event, such as the Olympic or Paralympic Games and, where applicable, conduct results management of the cases related to such athletes.
 
According to information received by WADA, the sample in this case was not flagged by RUSADA as being a priority sample when it was received by the anti-doping laboratory in Stockholm, Sweden. This meant the laboratory did not know to fast-track the analysis of this sample.
 
As previously announced, under the terms of the Code, when a minor is involved in an anti-doping case, there is a requirement to investigate that athlete’s support personnel. RUSADA has already indicated it has begun that process. In addition, WADA’s independent Intelligence and Investigations Department will look into it.

22/11/21 – WADA PRESIDENT CALLS ON GOVERNMENTS TO IMPLEMENT SANCTION FRAMEWORK FOR UNESCO’S INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION AGAINST DOPING IN SPORT

Montreal, 26 October 2021 – The President of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), Witold Bańka, was in Paris today to address the 8th Session of the Conference of Parties to the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport (Convention) being held from 26-28 October 2021. The Convention, which is the legal framework under which Governments can address anti-doping issues, is the second most successful in the history of UNESCO, in terms of the pace of ratification, with only four countries of the world yet to sign up.

Stressing the importance of Governments’ involvement in anti-doping, the WADA President said it was vital for the entire anti-doping system that Governments of the world implement the Convention effectively. Mr. Bańka said: “From the outset, WADA, UNESCO and Governments have been partners. We are connected by a common mission. WADA oversees the World Anti-Doping Code while UNESCO is the custodian of the Convention which Governments commit to uphold. Governments are responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the Convention and they must be held to account for the commitments they have made in this regard. However, today there is no strong process under the Convention where Governments face consequences if they do not comply.

“The importance of Governments in anti-doping cannot be overestimated. Through legislation, policies, regulations, administrative practices and funding, they can take actions that are not available to the Sport Movement or to WADA. Governments can, in particular, restrict the availability or use of doping substances, increase border controls and fund Anti-Doping Organizations. When implemented effectively, the Convention is a robust instrument that works in tandem with and is complementary to the Code.

“Making sure State Parties stick to it must be a priority for UNESCO. Athletes who break the rules face severe consequences. The same is true for Anti-Doping Organizations, sports federations and other Signatories to the Code. But there is no real penalty for Governments that choose not to play by the rules.

“For me, this is a weak link in the system. Now is the time to address this issue. Like every stakeholder in the system, Governments should face consequences if they do not deliver on the promises they made. We must be bold and ambitious and ensure there is a mechanism to bind Governments in this area. All of us – WADA, UNESCO and Governments – must collaborate to fill the gap. I believe that it is in the interests of all Governments of the world to do this in order to provide a level playing field for athletes worldwide. Weaknesses in the system serve no purpose except to provide opportunities for those who wish to break the rules.

“The benefits of collaborating are as clear as they are far-reaching. More than simply upholding rules and regulations, anti-doping is about ensuring that sport continues to be a force for good in our world; that it maintains the trust of athletes and the general public. It is tied up with national identity, pride, good health and instilling the right values of integrity, respect and camaraderie. It is about using the power of sport to positively influence society. This makes anti-doping a societal issue as well as a sporting one.”

During his speech, Mr. Bańka also outlined some of the work being carried out by WADA across a range of anti-doping areas, including education, intelligence and investigations, testing, scientific research and capacity building, as well as the Agency’s core business of overseeing the evolution of the Code and monitoring the compliance of all Signatories. He also pointed out the need for more funding of the anti-doping system.

“As a global regulator, we must make every dollar count to ensure we can deliver on our mandate. The system continues to be successful but more financial resources are required to strengthen the Global Anti-Doping Program. Already, the Governments of the world and the Sport Movement are providing significant funding to WADA and to anti-doping generally and they should not have to shoulder this financial investment alone. It is for this reason that I am reaching out for other sources of funding, mainly from the private sector, to assist in the protection of clean sport.”

On Thursday 28 October, WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, will also address delegates at the Session of the Conference of Parties concerning WADA’s activities since the last Conference in 2019; UNESCO’s proposed Model Legislative Framework Policy document; its proposed funding formula for WADA; and a review by States Parties of the 2022 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods that comes into force on 1 January 2022.

Click here for a video featuring WADA’s participation today at the Conference of Parties.


22/11/21 – WADA ANNOUNCES INDEPENDENT OBSERVER TEAMS FOR BEIJING OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC GAMES

Montreal, 15 November 2021


The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce its Independent Observer (IO) program teams for the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, which will take place from 4-20 February and from 4-13 March 2022, respectively.  

WADA’s IO program, which has been running since the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia, and has included more than 50 major events during that time, is an important element of WADA’s compliance monitoring of Major Event Organizations. The IO teams provide an independent review of all aspects of the anti-doping programs as delivered at major events, including the Olympic and Paralympic Games.
 
WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “For the past 21 years, WADA IO teams have contributed to protect the integrity of the system at various major events around the world. The teams selected for Beijing 2022 represent a range of anti-doping professionals and athletes, all driven by a sense of fair play and the desire to make sure the athletes can benefit from the best anti-doping program at the Games. In what is a very effective mix of disciplines, the teams include experts in the fields of athlete representation, laboratories, medicine, science, testing, anti-doping policy, international relations and legal affairs.”
 
Each day during the Games, IO team members visit various event venues to observe how the anti-doping program is being implemented, from test distribution planning, the process of notification – including the work of chaperones, how the doping control officers are working in collecting the samples, to how those samples are stored and delivered for analysis, how the laboratory is carrying out the analysis process, the application of the Therapeutic Use Exemption process and finally, the results management process. The group will meet daily to go through their reports and flag any issues or potential improvement points.

In Beijing, the WADA IO teams, which are comprised of a combination of WADA staff, recognized anti-doping experts and other Anti-Doping Organizations’ specialists listed below, will work in collaboration with the International Testing Agency (ITA), which is operating the Olympic Games anti-doping program on behalf of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and with the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and its anti-doping team. Regular feedback will be provided so that the process can be strengthened in real time, while consolidated post-Games reports will formalize recommendations for the IOC, the IPC, the WADA-accredited laboratory in Beijing, the organizing committees, and WADA – all designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future events.
 
IO team for the 2022 Beijing Olympic Games:

  • Hitesh Patel (United Kingdom), Head of Music, Publishing and Copyright, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, UK Government; and Rapporteur to the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport (Chair)    
  • Karine Henrie (Canada), Deputy Director, Testing, WADA (Vice-Chair)
  • Stephen Bock (USA), Head of Legal and General Counsel, International Volleyball Federation (FIVB)
  • Thierry Boghosian (USA), Senior Manager, Laboratory Accreditation, WADA
  • Ying Cui (Canada), Manager, NADO/RADO Relations, WADA
  • Chika Hirai (Japan), General Manager, International Relations, Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA)
  • Vinicius Sardela (Brazil), Manager, Laboratory Operations, WADA
  • Dr. Yuhan Tan (Belgium), Medical Doctor, Member of WADA Athlete Committee, Former international badminton player
  • Alexis Webber (Switzerland), Head of Anti-Doping, International Football Federation (FIFA)

IO team for the 2022 Beijing Paralympic Games

  • Shafag Huseynli (Azerbaijan), CEO, Azerbaijan National Anti-Doping Agency (Chair)          
  • Ilaria Baudo (Italy), Senior Manager, Testing, WADA (Vice-Chair)
  • Mike Earl (United Kingdom), General Manager, Anti-Doping, World Rugby
  • Sameh Elray (Egypt), Manager, Africa Office, WADA
  • Adriana Escobar (El Salvador), Member of WADA Athlete Committee, International rower

As was the case at Tokyo 2020, WADA’s Outreach Program, which has been a long-standing fixture during the Games to raise anti-doping awareness among athletes and others, will not be present in Beijing in its usual format due to the COVID-19 restrictions. While these important face-to-face interactions will not be possible on this occasion, the program is still planning other ways to promote clean sport inside the Athlete Village


13/10/21 WADA CALLS FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF THE ANTI-DOPING SYSTEM IN AFRICA DURING FORUM WITH SPORTS MINISTERS

Montreal, 13 October 2021 – Today, the leadership of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) called on each African nation to strengthen and build the capacity of its own anti-doping program, at an important virtual forum attended by 10 Ministers for Sport from across the continent, plus the Commissioner for Health, Humanitarian Affairs and Social Development in the African Union.

WADA President Witold Bańka, Vice-President Yang Yang and Director General Olivier Niggli were united in thanking the Ministers of Sport and other senior Government officials of African countries for their commitment to anti-doping, and encouraged further support for and from the region. The meeting was organized by WADA as part of a series of such opportunities to gather and share the views, concerns and ideas of Governments around the world. Similar meetings have taken place in other regions of the world and more are planned in the near future, including with Ministers from other African countries not attending this forum.

In his address, WADA President Witold Bańka outlined some of the work being undertaken by WADA, particularly as it relates to its response to the COVID-19 pandemic, funding for anti-doping and athlete engagement, as well as longer-term projects associated with WADA’s 2020-2024 Strategic Plan. He was clear that for the success of the anti-doping system, it was crucial that WADA continued to enjoy the support of Governments in Africa and elsewhere.

Speaking to the Ministers, Mr. Bańka said: “The Governments of the world are key stakeholders for WADA and we want to ensure that you are kept up to date on the very latest developments within anti-doping. Just as importantly, we wish to hear from you and respond to your questions, comments or concerns. We want to consider the growing importance of the African continent in sport and the important role African Governments play in the anti-doping eco-system and find ways to enhance that contribution.”

WADA’s President spoke about the importance of building anti-doping capacity across the continent of Africa, in particular that each country should have its own robust program. He stressed that to accomplish this, collaboration was essential. Governments play a crucial role and must be receptive to unlocking and enabling the creation of strong and relevant anti-doping programs at the national level, he said.

He continued: “Another vitally important group of stakeholders with whom we must collaborate more is the athletes. Anti-doping is all about the wellbeing and rights of athletes. It is our responsibility to strive to give them the opportunity to compete on a level playing field. A key priority identified in WADA’s Strategic Plan is to be more athlete-centered so that whatever we do, we do it with the participation of athletes of the world. We must listen to their needs; understand what frustrates and motivates them; tune into their considered views; and ultimately, take decisions based on that input. It is a balancing act to find common ground among so many different views – but it is important to listen and hear what athletes expect from the global anti-doping system. We will continue to ensure that the African athletes’ voices are heard.”

Witold Bańka, a former 400m runner at the international level, was joined virtually at the meeting by WADA Vice-President and double Olympic gold medal-winning short-track speed-skater, Yang Yang, from China.

Continuing the theme of collaboration and development in her speech, Yang Yang said: “For Africa to play its part in strengthening the global anti-doping movement, African Governments and African sports federations must also work together. Governments and sports must stand shoulder-to-shoulder in pursuit of protecting the health and well-being of African athletes; sing with one voice in protecting national pride in the performances of athletes; jointly uphold athletes’ rights and responsibilities; and collaboratively create a conducive environment for the development and implementation of strong and sustainable anti-doping programs. It is this same philosophy that led to WADA’s creation 22 years ago, and it remains true today. If we work together as one, we can achieve anything.”

In his presentation, WADA Director General Olivier Niggli provided detail on WADA’s Strategic Plan and also encouraged ongoing partnership and collaboration. He provided the Ministers with a brief overview of the history of WADA, the challenges that WADA is confronting and the plans in place to ensure that going forward, WADA is well placed to deal with these challenges and to make the most of the opportunities that arise.


13/10/21WADA RELEASES FOUR LABORATORY TECHNICAL DOCUMENTS FOR 2022

Montreal, 13 October 2021

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes today the following revised Technical Documents (TDs) for 2022 and Summaries of Modifications, which were approved by WADA’s Executive Committee, via circulatory vote, on 6 October 2021.

Under the International Standard for Laboratories, WADA’s TDs are issued to provide direction to WADA-accredited Laboratories, WADA-approved Laboratories for the Athlete Biological Passport, and other stakeholders, on specific technical or procedural issues. As part of WADA’s mandate to enhance anti-doping activities under the World Anti-Doping Code, TDs undergo periodic revisions to reflect scientific and technological advances in the performance of anti-doping tests and the reporting of test results. They are refined and revised in consultation with WADA stakeholders.

2022 TECHNICAL DOCUMENTS

Please note that all WADA-accredited Laboratories are required to implement the following TDs in their procedures by 1 January 2022:

  1. TD2022EPO: This TD relates to the harmonization of analysis and reporting of erythropoietin (EPO) and other erythropoietin-receptor agonists (ERAs) by polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (PAGE) analytical methods. It replaces the current TD2021EPO v2.0. In this new version of the TD, an Annex B has been included, which describes the existence of a minor EPO gene variant that is present in a minor percentage (< 1%) of individuals with East Asian ancestry and provides further guidance for the management and reporting of recombinant EPO (recEPO) findings.
  2. TD2022MRPL: This TD relates to the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) and applicable minimum reporting levels (MRLs) for non-threshold substances analyzed by chromatographic-mass spectrometric analytical methods. It replaces the current TD2019MRPL. In this new version of the TD, important changes have been incorporated, including among others:
  • the concept of MRL for some non-threshold substances;
  • the difference between MRPL and MRL;
  • the adjustment of concentrations of target analyte(s) of non-threshold substances with an MRL with specific gravity > 1.018;
  • revised requirements for reporting an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF) for non-threshold substances subject to an MRL, including the use of an internal standard, of a single-point calibrator at 120% MRL, and of a quality control sample at MRL;
  • the definition of new MRLs for some substances (e.g., growth promoters (as per WADA Technical Letter 23); some diuretics/contaminants (as per WADA Technical Letter 24); vilanterol (a beta-2 agonist); dextran, mannitol and probenecid (masking agents); the cocaine parent compound; and some glucocorticoids).
  1. TD2022DL: This TD relates to the decision limits for the confirmatory quantification of exogenous threshold substances by chromatography-based analytical methods. It replaces the current TD2021DL. This new version of the TD DL has been modified to make it consistent with the TD2022MRPL regarding the reporting of findings for threshold substances (namely salbutamol, formoterol, cathine, ephedrine, methylephedrine and pseudoephedrine) when detected in conjunction with a diuretic subject to an MRL, or in the presence of any other diuretic or a masking agent. Further clarifications are provided in cases where there is an approved Therapeutic Use Exemption for the diuretic and/or the threshold substance. In addition, it has been clarified that, for cathine, the threshold of 5.00 μg/mL and decision limit of 6.00 μg/mL are applicable to cathine and its l-enantiomer.
  2. TD2022IRMS: This TD relates to the detection of synthetic forms of prohibited substances by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). It replaces the current TD2021IRMS v2.0. In this new version of the TD IRMS, prednisone and prednisolone have been removed as target compounds for GC/C/IRMS analysis. This decision has been triggered by the revised, higher MRLs defined for these two glucocorticoids in the TD2022MRPL, which make GC/C/IRMS analysis unnecessary for reporting AAFs at levels higher than the MRL. In addition, further clarifications are provided on the use of secondary endogenous reference compounds.

The above TDs are available and indexed on WADA’s website.
 
Should you have any questions or comments regarding the 2022 Technical Documents, please do not hesitate to contact WADA’s Science Department at: science@wada-ama.org.


18/09/21 – FINAL REMINDER: WADA INVITES CANDIDATES TO APPLY FOR 2022 STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER VACANCIES

Montreal, 16 September 2021 – Following our communications of 31 May 2021 and 12 August, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind the anti-doping community of the vacant seats on WADA’s 2022 Standing Committees. We invite interested candidates for the vacancies outlined below to apply by 1 October 2021.

The Standing Committees, which report to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), play a key advisory role in policy and priority development for the Agency. The successful candidates will be approved by WADA’s ExCo on 24 November 2021 and take office on 1 January 2022 for three-year terms.

The vacancies are listed below with hyperlinks to the current Terms of Reference (TOR) of each Standing Committee.

Please note that, as it relates to the independent member vacancy on the Compliance Review Committee (CRC), there was an earlier application deadline of 3 September 2021 due to involvement of the Nominations Committee in the process.
 

Committees [Terms of Reference (TOR)]Vacant positionsDeadline
Athlete Committee [TOR]
Five positions
 
[Two seats are filled by athletes who  also sit on WADA’s Foundation  Board]
 
Friday, 1 October 2021

Education Committee [TOR]
 
Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021

Finance and Administration  Committee [TOR]
 
Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021

Health, Medical and Research  Committee [TOR]
 
Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021


To be considered, all applications must include the following:

  1. an updated curriculum vitae(1), which fully outlines the candidate’s experience and expertise; and
     
  2. a letter of endorsement from one of WADA’s current Foundation Board members or a recognized WADA stakeholder group.

We invite candidates to send their applications by Friday, 1 October 2021 to Mr. Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General (c/o marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org).

Any questions should also be directed to Mr. Niggli, c/o Ms. Chinnarassen.

WADA thanks all applicants for their interest.

Note:

(1) For purposes of review, evaluation and approval, candidates consent to the sharing of their curriculum vitae and candidate file (and personal information contained therein) with the WADA Director General, the Chair of the relevant Standing Committee, the Nominations Committee where applicable, and the Executive Committee and Foundation Board, in accordance with ‘Article VI, By-Laws on Standing Committees’ and ‘Article IX, Candidate Privacy Policy’ of WADA’s Governance Regulations. Candidates are kindly asked to review the Candidate Privacy Policy for details about how their personal information will be processed by WADA. By submitting their application, candidates confirm that they have read and understood the policy and accept its terms


18/09/21 – WADA CONTRIBUTES TO OECD’S COMPENDIUM OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS’ PRACTICES

Montreal, 16 September 2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) welcomes the publication by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) of its ‘Compendium of International Organizations’ Practices’, which was launched at the eighth Annual Meeting of International Organization Partnership, held virtually this week. The Agency was pleased to assist the OECD in compiling this useful publication by providing presentations of key practices in the field of anti-doping.
 
The Compendium is the first common tool developed collaboratively by regulatory International Organizations to improve the quality of their outputs across a wide range of topics, including anti-doping. The document includes examples of specific efforts undertaken by International Organizations to work towards more effective development, implementation and evaluation of international instruments, as well as ensuring stakeholder engagement and cooperation between International Organizations themselves.
 
As part of its participation in the Partnership of International Organizations for Effective International Rule Making, established and led by the OECD, WADA was one of more than 50 International Organizations that contributed to the Compendium, by sharing information regarding:

  • World Anti-Doping Code (Code) Compliance;
  • WADA’s Code Compliance Monitoring Program; and
  • Collaboration with the International Laboratory Accreditation Co-operation (ILAC), which coordinates the assessment of WADA-accredited laboratories under both the International Standard for Laboratories and the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO’s)/International Electrotechnical Commission’s (IEC’s) standard (ISO/IEC 17025), concurrently.  

WADA’s Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “WADA is an organization that is based on cooperation, with athletes, Governments of the world, the Sport Movement and many other stakeholders. Since our formation in 1999, we have built dozens of partnerships with various international bodies. Engaging with other International Organizations, including through this partnership of regulatory organizations set up by the OECD, has proven to be highly productive, allowing WADA to share its experience and expertise in building and overseeing a comprehensive regulatory framework for anti-doping but also to learn from others on their regulatory and cooperation practices. We were pleased to assist with the compilation of this compendium and we thank the OECD for leading this initiative.”      


17/08/21 – REMINDER: WADA INVITES CANDIDATES TO APPLY FOR 2022 STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER VACANCIES

DEADLINE FOR THE INDEPENDENT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE CRC IS 3 SEPTEMBER 2021

DEADLINE FOR OTHER VACANCIES IS 1 OCTOBER 2021

Montreal, 12 August 2021 – Following our communication of 31 May 2021, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) wishes to remind the anti-doping community of the vacant seats on WADA’s 2022 Standing Committees. We invite interested candidates for the independent member vacancy on the Compliance Review Committee (CRC) to apply by 3 September 2021 and candidates for the other vacancies to apply by 1 October 2021.

The Standing Committees, which report to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), play a key advisory role in policy and priority development for the Agency. The successful candidates will be approved by WADA’s ExCo on 24 November 2021 and take office on 1 January 2022 for three-year terms.

The vacancies are listed below with hyperlinks to the current Terms of Reference (TOR) of each Standing Committee.

 

Committees [Terms of Reference (TOR)]Vacant positionsDeadline
Athlete Committee [TOR]
Five positions
 
[Two seats are filled by athletes who  also sit on WADA’s Foundation Board]
 
Friday, 1 October 2021
Compliance Review Committee [TOR]
 

One independent compliance expert  position 

As stated in WADA’s Governance  Regulations, WADA’s Nominations  Committee shall be responsible for  recruiting, reviewing and vetting the  candidates for the positions of  independent members of the CRC.  Applicants who meet the stricter  independence criteria required for  independent members of the CRC,  may however apply in order to  expand the candidate pool from  which the Nominations Committee  can consider.
 
Friday, 3 September 2021
 
[Earlier deadline because of the involvement of the  Nominations Committee in  the process.]

Education Committee [TOR]
 
Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021

Finance and Administration  Committee [TOR]
 
Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021

Health, Medical and Research  Committee [TOR]
 
Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021


To be considered, all applications must include the following:

  1. an updated curriculum vitae(1), which fully outlines the candidate’s experience and expertise; and
     
  2. a letter of endorsement from one of WADA’s current Foundation Board members or a recognized WADA stakeholder group. [It should be noted that this is not required for the independent compliance expert position.]

Applicants submitting their file to be considered by WADA’s Nominations Committee for the vacancy of independent compliance expert will need to include confirmation that they meet the required stricter independence criteria.

We invite candidates to send their applications by Friday, 1 October 2021 (or Friday, 3 September 2021 as it relates to the CRC vacancy) to Mr. Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General (c/o marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org).

Any questions should also be directed to Mr. Niggli, c/o Ms. Chinnarassen.

WADA thanks all applicants for their interest.


Note:

(1) For purposes of review, evaluation and approval, candidates consent to the sharing of their curriculum vitae and candidate file (and personal information contained therein) with the WADA Director General, the Chair of the relevant Standing Committee, the Nominations Committee where applicable, and the Executive Committee and Foundation Board, in accordance with ‘Article VI, By-Laws on Standing Committees’ and ‘Article IX, Candidate Privacy Policy’ of WADA’s Governance Regulations. Candidates are kindly asked to review the Candidate Privacy Policy for details about how their personal information will be processed by WADA. By submitting their application, candidates confirm that they have read and understood the policy and accept its terms


22/07/21 – WADA PRESIDENT UPDATES IOC SESSION ON AGENCY’S MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN ADVANCE OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES

Montreal, 20 July 2021 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA’s) President, Witold Bańka, delivered a speech to the 138th International Olympic Committee (IOC) Session held in Tokyo in advance of the Olympic Games. Mr. Bańka updated IOC members on WADA activities since the IOC’s last session in March 2021, in particular those that were preparatory for the Games, and expressed confidence that, in collaboration with all stakeholders, the Agency would continue to strengthen the global anti-doping system for athletes worldwide.

Addressing IOC members for the first time in person since January 2020, Mr. Bańka’s speech focused on how WADA worked with the anti-doping community worldwide to ensure a return to normal testing levels despite the challenges posed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

WADA’s President said: “In recent months, we have been working with our anti-doping partners around the world and have overseen a return to full testing capacity. Our focus has been to ensure that the Games – and all other major sporting events – are protected and that athletes are afforded the level playing field that they so richly deserve.”

The latest available figures show that more than 25,000 samples were collected in June 2021 by more than 150 Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs), which was the highest number of samples collected since March 2020. Despite restrictions still in place in many parts of the world, out-of-competition testing has moved to a level significantly greater than for the same period in 2019.

Mr. Bańka informed IOC members that in the build-up to the Games, WADA had urged all ADOs to make the most of the remaining time to ensure that all athletes bound for Tokyo were properly tested, and to implement the testing recommendations that they received from the Pre-Games Expert Group led by the International Testing Agency (ITA) on behalf of the IOC. WADA also reminded them that the IOC-funded pre-Olympic long-term storage program delivered by the ITA was available to them, at no cost, so they could securely put samples away in a long-term storage facility for possible further analysis in the months and years to come. Storage and further analysis of samples has yielded considerable success in previous years and has proven to be an effective deterrent.

WADA’s President highlighted the presence in Tokyo of a WADA-coordinated Independent Observer team to monitor the anti-doping activities of the Games, and he stressed the hard work that had gone in to ensuring that the WADA-accredited laboratory in Tokyo was ready for the challenges that awaited.

He said: “I am looking forward to the next few weeks as we watch the world’s best athletes gather. I hope they will amaze us with their sense of fair play as much as with their athletic prowess. I am sure there will be further challenges to face along the way. But I am confident that, together, we will continue to strengthen the global anti-doping system and, as a result, sport in general.”

Among other topics, Mr. Bańka’s update included: Russia and the progress of Operation LIMS that relates to the data and doping control samples retrieved by WADA from the former Moscow Laboratory; how WADA’s Intelligence & Investigations and Legal Affairs teams collaborated with International Federations to prevent athletes or support personnel against whom there is clear evidence of cheating from Operation LIMS from participating in the Games; advances in anti-doping research, particularly as it relates to dried blood spot analysis and how it will be used at the Tokyo Games; engagement by athletes worldwide with WADA’s Anti-Doping Education and Learning (ADEL) programs, ‘ADEL for Tokyo Olympics’ and ‘ADEL for Tokyo Paralympics’; enhanced athlete engagement; and WADA’s ongoing governance reforms.

Mr. Bańka’s full report to the IOC Session, which was submitted in advance, can be accessed here.


20/07/21 – WADA STATEMENT ON GERMAN BROADCASTER ARD DOCUMENTARY

Montreal, 16 July 2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) notes the contents of the 16 July 2021 documentary by German broadcaster, ARD, which makes a number of statements regarding the possibility of prohibited substances being passed through the skin of athletes via a process of sabotage.

WADA acknowledges that some athletes may be concerned when viewing this documentary. However, this possibility is well known within the anti-doping community. It is considered to be a very rare occurrence based on the small number of such cases that have arisen historically, and its potential is scientifically limited to a very small number of prohibited substances that could be absorbed through the skin into someone’s system (for example, the anabolic steroid, clostebol).

WADA has not seen the details of the experiment carried out for the purposes of making the documentary, including which substances were used or the levels detected. The Agency is in contact with the documentary makers and will ask them to share any relevant evidence. In addition, WADA looks forward to publication of a peer-reviewed paper in a scientific journal, as announced by the experiment’s authors in the documentary, so that the results can be properly analyzed. With this information, WADA will be able to assess whether any new data has been brought to light. WADA continually adapts its methods and processes as scientific evidence is revealed, including by the adjustment of decision limits for some substances, as demonstrated by the Agency’s recent measures taken in relation to potential contamination cases connected to meat and diuretics.

It is important to note that manipulation of athletes’ samples as highlighted in the documentary is a criminal act. WADA was given the authority to conduct investigations under the version of the World Anti-Doping Code that came into effect on 1 January 2015. Since then, the Agency, along with other Anti-Doping Organizations, has collaborated with law enforcement agencies around the world to ensure those who perpetrate crimes related to doping are brought to justice.

The documentary also highlights the important principle of strict liability within the anti-doping system, which states that an athlete is responsible for the substances found in their body following analysis of their sample (a stage at which the athlete has the opportunity to request confirmation of the results of their first sample via analysis of a second sample). The strict liability principle set forth in the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) is well accepted and has been consistently upheld in the decisions of courts and anti-doping tribunals, including the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) and the Swiss Federal Tribunal. The Code has also been drafted giving consideration to the principles of proportionality and human rights.

Just because an athlete returns a positive test does not mean they are guilty of an Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV) or that they will receive a suspension. Anti-Doping Organizations must be able to show that an ADRV has taken place. Within the principle of strict liability in anti-doping, which is devised to ensure fairness for all athletes, there is flexibility for an athlete who can demonstrate that they were not at fault during the various stages of the process, including on first instance and appeal. In the rare cases where an athlete may have been sabotaged by whatever means, a mechanism exists within the results management stage of the process that allows them to provide contextual explanations of the suspected origin of the case. This point is clearly demonstrated within the documentary itself as in nearly all the cases of alleged sabotage or contamination highlighted, the athletes were exonerated.

Athletes can continue to be confident that the system designed to protect them, which has been built and has evolved through input from all anti-doping stakeholders worldwide, will continue to include multiple safeguards and will be further adjusted as science advances.


13/07/21 – WADA POSTPONES GLOBAL EDUCATION CONFERENCES IN AUSTRALIA AND FRANCE TO 2022 AND 2024

Montreal, 9 July 2021 

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announces that its next Global Education Conference (GEC), which was originally scheduled to be held in Australia in October 2020 and was then postponed to 2021 due to obstacles stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, has now been re-scheduled to September 2022. The specific dates, city and venue will be communicated as soon as possible.

Similar to the successful GECs WADA convened in 2015 (in Ottawa, Canada) and 2018 (in Beijing, China), the 2022 GEC will gather anti-doping practitioners and researchers from around the world to share and discuss emerging trends; contribute to education program development; and, examine how Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) can enhance their education programs while keeping athletes and their support personnel at the center of their learning strategies.

WADA’s Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “WADA and our Australian hosts, Sport Integrity Australia, have decided to postpone the next Global Education Conference once more and hopefully for the last time. By focusing on September 2022, we anticipate being able to maximize in-person attendance, while preparing to offer a virtual solution for those stakeholders that may not be able to attend in person. We would like to thank Sport Integrity Australia for its patience and flexibility in accommodating the Conference, which we are very excited to hold and hope will be a success.”

The GEC was initially scheduled to be held before the International Standard for Education (ISE) came into force on 1 January 2021. WADA therefore wishes to remind stakeholders that, beyond the ISE, a variety of resources are now available on the Agency’s Anti-Doping Education and Learning Platform (ADEL) as part of its Code Implementation Support Program (CISP), which was launched in May 2020. The resources include Guidelines for Education, factsheets, checklists and recorded webinars, as well as a series of ‘live’ webinars that WADA hosts on a variety of topics as outlined in our webinar schedule.

2024 Global Education Conference in France

WADA is also in discussions with the Agence française de lutte contre le dopage (AFLD) to re-schedule the GEC that was originally to be held in France in 2022 to 2024; and, will inform the anti-doping community as soon as possible regarding the specific dates, city and venue. The Agency is grateful to AFLD for being open to accommodating this change.

Should you have any questions regarding the GECs, please contact Anaïs Lefevre, WADA’s Manager, Projects & Events at anais.lefevre@wada-ama.org.

We look forward to welcoming participants to Australia and France in 2022 and 2024.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


08/06/21 – WADA ENCOURAGES CONTINUED COLLABORATION IN ANTI-DOPING AMONG GOVERNMENTS OF ASIA

Montreal, 7 July 2021 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) encouraged continued collaboration in anti-doping across all nations within the Asia region in order to strengthen the anti-doping system for athletes of the region and the world. Addressing a virtual meeting of the Ministers of Sport and other senior Government officials of the East, South and South-East Asian countries to discuss anti-doping matters, WADA President, Vice-President and Director General were united in thanking the public authorities for their commitment to anti-doping, and encouraged further support for and from the region that is preparing to host the next two Olympic and Paralympic Games, in Tokyo and Beijing, as well as a number of other major championships.

The meeting was organized by WADA as the first of its kind and 21 Governments of Asia were represented. Future similar meetings are also planned, both in Asia and other regions of the world. In his address, WADA President Witold Bańka outlined some of the work currently being undertaken by the Agency, particularly as it relates to its response to the COVID-19 pandemic and preparation for the upcoming Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, as well as longer-term projects associated with WADA’s Strategic Plan 2020-2024. He said that for the success of the anti-doping system, it was crucial that WADA continued to enjoy the support of Governments.

Speaking to the public authority officials, President Bańka said: “It is encouraging for WADA to see how Governments in Asia are stepping up to the challenge of anti-doping in sport. To see so many Governments of Asia represented here today shows us just how seriously this issue is being taken. I congratulate you for your efforts in promoting regional cooperation and partnership. This is very important and worthwhile work. It is vital that you continue your support of National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations in Asia, to give them the resources they need and also to be strong ambassadors in your nations of our collective mission for doping-free sport.

“Asia is becoming more and more important on the global sporting stage as it continues to host successful events. With that increase in profile comes a responsibility to ensure that everything possible is being done to protect the integrity of sports. WADA stands ready to support you in that goal.

“From WADA’s perspective, our new Strategic Plan places athletes at the center and is shaping the transformational journey that WADA has embarked on. Day in, day out, WADA will continue to collaborate with athletes and all our partners worldwide to strengthen the World Anti-Doping Program. We are committed to building anti-doping capacity and community, and to securing the additional funding that is required to further enable doping-free sport. We are confident that with the support of all our clean sport partners, including the Governments of this region, we will succeed.”

President Bańka is a former 400m runner at the international level for his native Poland and he was joined virtually at the meeting by another former athlete, WADA Vice-President and double Olympic gold medal-winning short-track speed-skater, Yang Yang, from China, who said that although she retired from elite sport some years ago, she still thinks like an athlete and that was where her first priority would always be.

Yang Yang said: “Much work has been done to secure athletes’ confidence and trust in the system, which they so richly deserve. We want all stakeholders – and that includes Governments of the world – to have the opportunity to input their expertise and influence to ensure that the clean athlete prevails and to ensure that young people are protected from the scourge of doping.”

In addition, the Vice-President’s speech focused on education and she outlined the important work WADA was doing in this area, stressing that the vast majority of athletes wanted to complete clean. She said: “In addition to educating athletes, crucially, we must inform and equip their entourage, too. This includes parents, coaches, trainers and doctors, who have such an important role to play. If we can educate the entourage and make them understand the importance of clean competition, it will filter down to the athlete, even those of a very young age.”

In his presentation, WADA Director General Olivier Niggli provided detail on WADA’s Strategic Plan and also encouraged ongoing partnership and collaboration. He said: “I am confident in our team’s ability to lead anti-doping in a new era – an era where athletes can expect that their efforts be met with a level playing field. But while WADA is the global regulatory body for anti-doping in sport, we can only deliver on our mission in cooperation with all our stakeholders around the world, including the Governments of Asia. Together, we can maintain and forge strong partnerships to build regional capacity, enhance education and implement anti-doping program development across the region – partnerships that are crucial to the success of the entire anti-doping movement.”


01/07/21 – WADA RELEASES NEW EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR ‘TALENTED ATHLETES’

Montreal, 30 June 2021 – Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) releases a new education program entitled ‘ADEL for Talented Athletes’ which is available on the Agency’s Anti-Doping Education and Learning Platform (ADEL).
 
This new education program, specifically targeting ‘Talented Athletes’, is the sixth program that has been made available for athletes on ADEL. In line with the International Standard for Education (ISE), this program provides a solution for Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) wishing to educate athletes at the ‘talented level’ as defined and recommended within WADA’s Guidelines for Education.
 
Under the Guidelines, athletes at the talented level are defined as ‘athletes training regularly and committed to sport, identified as talented through some formal mechanism such as attending talent camps, or part of a talented development program’. ‘ADEL for Talented Athletes’ reinforces values that are important to their athletic career, including respect, integrity and resilience, and introduces the main aspects of anti-doping. 

Some of the other key topics taught in this program are:

  • Clean sport and the anti-doping system;
  • Safe use of medications in sport;
  • Food and healthy eating;
  • Introduction to the anti-doping testing process;
  • Sharing concerns about doping via WADA’s Speak Up! whistleblower platform; and
  • Consequences of doping.

WADA Director of Education, Amanda Hudson, said: “This is the first time an online education program for younger, talented, athletes has been developed by WADA. Educating along the athlete pathway and reaching younger athletes is important to support the development of ethical sporting behavior by instilling the values of clean sport at an early age. With the release of this program, more athletes will have the opportunity to access education, joining the 20,000+ athletes who have already enrolled for our existing education programs hosted on ADEL.

“Some of these athletes will advance to international competition such as the Youth Olympic Games or international age-group championships; and, many will continue as athletes and/or in Athlete Support Personnel roles such as coaching. As such, providing values-based education at this stage can play a fundamental role in the development of their sporting careers and should be prioritized.”

While the course is currently available in English, the French and Spanish versions are under development and will be made available on ADEL in the coming months.

WADA would like to take this opportunity to remind athletes and ADOs, as well as National Olympic and Paralympic Committees, that with the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games fast approaching, our ‘ADEL for Tokyo Olympics and ADEL for Tokyo Paralympics courses remain available as pre-Games education solutions for athletes and coaches who are heading to the Tokyo Games. The courses are accessible on the ADEL platform under the Major Events Education catalog and are available in a variety of languages, thanks to the translation efforts of ADOs around the globe.

ADOs who would like to keep track of new courses and resources on ADEL are invited to visit the ADEL Roadmap. For any questions regarding the ‘ADEL for Talented Athletes’ education program, or to provide feedback on any of our courses and education programs, please contact WADA’s Education Department at: ADEL@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


29/06/21 – WADA TO HOLD ADDITIONAL ‘LIVE’ WEBINARS IN JULY AS PART ITS AFRICA REGION SERIES

Montreal, 28 June 2021
 
Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes its ‘live’ webinar schedule for July, which encompasses webinars being offered as part of the Agency’s Africa webinar series organized by the Agency’ Africa Regional Office to assist anti-doping stakeholders in the region.
 
Unless otherwise noted, the webinars are being hosted in English only.
 

Date/TimeWebinar TitleSpeakersWebinar Series & Target audienceTo Register

5 July
08:00 EDT/
12:00 GMT
Anti-Doping Information for Medical Professionals in Africa participating at the Tokyo Games Sameh Elray, Manager, Africa Office, WADA (Moderator)
 
Alan Vernec,
Medical Director, WADA
Africa Series

Medical Professionals,
National Olympic Committee (NOC) Medical Commissions,
National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADO) & Regional Anti-Doping Organizations
(RADO)
To register, please send your information (name, country, job title) to sameh.elray@wada-ama.org as soon as possible

6 July
08:00 EDT/
12:00 GMT
Anti-Doping Information for Medical Professionals in Africa participating at the Tokyo Games

(in French)
Katia Alloun, TUE Manager, WADA
 
Sameh Elray,
Manager, Africa Office, WADA (Moderator)
Africa Series

Medical Professionals,
NOC Medical Commissions,
NADOs & RADOs
To register, please send your information (name, country, job title) to sameh.elray@wada-ama.org as soon as possible


We also take the opportunity to remind stakeholders of the remaining webinar to be held in June:
 

Date/TimeWebinar TitleSpeakersWebinar Series & Target audienceTo Register

29 June
22:30 EDT/
30 June
11:30 Tokyo Time
Applicable sanctions in Results Management Kenny Lee, Manager, Asia/Oceania Office, WADA (Moderator)
 
Tharinda Puth,
Manager, Legal Affairs, WADA
Code Implementation Support Program (CISP) Series / Asia-Oceania Series

Anti-Doping Organizations and members of Disciplinary / Appeal Panels from Asia/Oceania countries
Register here
 
Please first create an ADEL account before registering via the link above.

To register, please simply view the registration instructions in the ‘To Register’ columns of the above tables.

Please note that on an ongoing basis, WADA will communicate its evolving live webinar schedule and prompt stakeholders to register and participate.

Should you have any questions regarding the above, please contact Ms. Selva Balasingam, WADA Communications Coordinator, at: selva.balasingam@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agen

17/06/21 – WADA ANNOUNCES FURTHER RISE IN GLOBAL TESTING FIGURES IN LEAD-UP TO TOKYO 2020

Montreal, 16 June  2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announced today that global testing figures are continuing to rise as activities of a growing number of Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) worldwide are returning to normal.
 
As announced in May, the overall number of samples collected by ADOs around the world is quickly going up despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The latest figures, released today, show that 24,430 samples were collected in May 2021 by 152 ADOs, which is the highest number of samples collected since the pandemic started in March 2020.
 
Despite restrictions that are still in place throughout parts of the world, out-of-competition testing is now at a level greater than for the same period in 2019. Specifically, in April 2021, 14,560 out-of-competition tests were carried out compared to 12,713 in April 2019. In May, the number went up to 16,149, compared to 13,691 for the same month in 2019 and was the highest number of out-of-competition samples collected over the past 29 months. In-competition testing figures for May 2021 were also the highest in the past 15 months with 8,281 samples collected from events and competitions.
 
WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “The rise of testing numbers around the world represents a significant effort on the part of Anti-Doping Organizations in light of the ongoing pandemic. WADA thanks them for their commitment, flexibility and determination to deliver a quality testing program in challenging circumstances. With just over a month to go before the start of the Olympic Games, Anti-Doping Organizations are in the final phase of delivering on their strategic testing plans. WADA urges them all to continue to make the most of this time to ensure that all athletes bound for Tokyo have been properly tested and to implement the testing recommendations they have received from the Pre-Games Expert Group led by the International Testing Agency (ITA).”
 
This Pre-Games Expert Group has issued test recommendations to all the Summer Olympic International Federations (IFs) and National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs and RADOs) for athletes likely to participate in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020, as part of a program to ensure they are subject to a suitable level of testing in the lead-up to the event.
 
WADA’s Director General added: “I would also like to remind all Anti-Doping Organizations that the International Olympic Committee (IOC)-funded pre-Olympic long-term storage program delivered by the ITA is available to them, at no cost, so they can securely put samples away in a long-term storage facility for possible further analysis in the months and years to come. As detection methods are constantly being improved and updated, retaining samples for up to 10 years means that those who have taken a prohibited substance cannot rest easy for a full decade after they have been tested. The storage and further analysis of samples has yielded considerable success in previous years and it is a requirement under the 2021 International Standard for Testing and Investigations that Anti-Doping Organizations must have a written strategy for storage and further analysis as part of their testing programs.
 
“The further analysis of samples collected during Beijing 2008 and London 2012 Olympic Games by the IOC has so far produced more than 130 Anti-Doping Rule Violations, which clearly highlights the effectiveness of such a program to provide more effective detection. I am confident that this program will continue to have further impact in the years to come.”
 
In addition, WADA is working to ensure that the WADA-accredited laboratory in Tokyo will be ready for the challenge of the Games. WADA will also have an Independent Observer (IO) team present in Tokyo to monitor the anti-doping activities at the Olympic Games and work in partnership with the IOC, the ITA and the organizing committee to ensure the most effective anti-doping program is delivered. Similarly, WADA will have an IO team monitoring the anti-doping activities of the Paralympic Games in partnership with the International Paralympic Committee.

Number of samples collected (blood, urine and Athlete Biological Passport)
2019-2021 Comparison
 

Month202120202019
January14,28020,28817,539
February17,73125,25923,819
March23,01711,20726,933
April22,09957825,219
May24,4302,62527,146
June 7,70626,904
July 11,08128,084
August 14,61929,360
September 18,69926,638
October 21,09426,897
November 19,63626,469
December 15,46420,873
Total 168,256305,881

















Number of samples collected out of competition
2019-2021 Comparison

 

Month202120202019
January10,15212,5469,988
February11,93713,62212,379
March15,2926,86813,139
April14,56056912,713
May16,1492,51213,691
June 6,73413,377
July 8,91614,933
August 9,87115,443
September 11,92015,015
October 13,09715,112
November 13,96315,265
December 10,88012,012
Total  68,090111,498163,067

15/06/21 –WADA ISSUES REVISED INTERNATIONAL STANDARD FOR RESULTS MANAGEMENT WITH MINOR AMENDMENTS

Montreal, 14 June 2021 

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) issues a revised International Standard for Results management (ISRM), which was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) on 20 May 2021 with immediate effect.

This new version has minor amendments, which are summarized below and available on WADA’s website, that were made to ensure the ISRM’s alignment with various WADA Technical Documents and the latest version of the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL).
 

  1. Article 3.6

At the time the ISRM was drafted, the definition of “Adaptive Model” was a defined term from the 2019 International Standard for Laboratories (ISL). In the 2021 version of the ISL, which was adopted at the November 2020 Executive Committee Meeting, the term “Adaptive Model” was removed as the ISL articles no longer referred to this term. However, the term “Adaptive Model” is used 18 times in the ISRM, specifically, Annex C – Results Management Requirements and Procedures for the Athlete Biological Passport.

In addition, the definition of “Athlete Passport Management Unit Report” is currently a defined term in one Technical Document, namely the WADA Technical Document related to the Athlete Passport Management Unit Requirements and Procedures (TDAPMU). However, this defined term is used seven times in the ISRM, specifically, Annex C – Results Management Requirements and Procedures for the Athlete Biological Passport.

Therefore, these two definitions concerning the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP), namely “Adaptative Model” and “Athlete Passport Management Unit Report”, were moved from the ISL and the TDAPMU respectively to the ISRM, where both definitions are better suited.
 

  1. Article 5.1.2.3

The Comment to article 5.1.2.3 of the ISRM referred to article 5.3.4.5.4.8.5 of the 2019 ISL and reflected the three-month deadline for the “B” Sample confirmation to be performed. Since the adoption of the 2021 version of the ISL in November 2019, article 5.3.4.5.4.8.5 of the 2019 ISL has become article 5.3.6.2.3 in the 2021 ISL and its relevant part was amended as follows:
 

If the “B” Confirmation Procedure is to be performed, either upon the request of the Athlete or the Testing Authority or Results Management Authority, it should be performed as soon as possible after the Testing Authority or Results Management Authority, as applicable, has provided such notice to the Laboratory.

The Comment to article 5.1.2.3 of the ISRM was amended accordingly.

  1. Comment to Article 8.6

The last sentence of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code) definition of “Operational Independence” was missing in the Comment to Article 8.6 of the ISRM.

For reasons of consistency between the Code and the ISRM, the missing sentence was added to the Comment to Article 8.6 of the ISRM.
 

  1. Articles C.2.1.6 and C.2.1.6.1

The “Suspicious Steroid Profile” (SSP) system was conceived in 2014 in part to deal with (i) unmatched samples due to the lack or delayed entry of Doping Control Forms (DCFs) at the time, (ii) the fact that some athletes may have had existing steroid data prior to 2014 indicating an elevated T/E not requiring Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS), and (iii) the heterogeneous use of external Athlete Passport Management Units (APMUs). With the mandatory entry of DCFs, the collection of six years of ABP data, and the mandatory use of WADA-approved APMUs, revisions to the SSP system were needed.

The ISRM was amended accordingly in order to provide flexibility to make changes to the SSP notification system of the steroid module in the Technical Document related to the Measurement and Reporting of Endogenous Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (EAAS) Markers of the Urinary Steroid Profile (TDEAAS) and the TDAPMU without contradicting the ISRM.

The purpose of the ISRM is to set out the core responsibilities of Anti-Doping Organizations with respect to Results Management. In addition to describing certain general principles of Results Management, the Standard also sets out the core obligations applicable to the various phases of Results Management from the initial review and notification of potential Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs), through Provisional Suspensions, the assertion of ADRVs and proposal of Consequences, the Hearing Process until the issuance, and notification of the decision and appeal.

Should you have questions or comments on the revised ISRM, please feel free to contact WADA’s Results Management Unit at: rm@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


13/06/21 – WADA STRENGTHENS GLOBAL ANTI-DOPING SYSTEM THROUGH RE-BUILD OF ITS ANTI-DOPING ADMINISTRATION AND
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

In this latest edition of ‘Spotlight’, which keeps stakeholders up to date on the activities being carried out by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) team and its partners, we look at WADA’s Anti-Doping Administration Management System (ADAMS), and how it is making athletes’ lives easier and the work of the anti-doping community more effective. Previous ‘Spotlight’ features are available on WADA’s website.

For many elite athletes and anti-doping professionals around the world, one of the most regular types of interaction they have with WADA is through ADAMS. Launched in 2005, ADAMS is a secure and cost-free, web-based system that centralizes doping control-related data such as: athlete whereabouts, testing history, laboratory results, the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP), Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs) and Anti-Doping Rule Violations. Available in 24 languages, ADAMS facilitates the sharing of information among relevant organizations and promotes efficiency, transparency and effectiveness in all anti-doping activities.

ADAMS allows data entry and storage, enabling data-sharing and reporting in a highly secure environment and is subject to strict data protection and personal privacy regulations. Under the World Anti-Doping Code, all Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) must use ADAMS for specific aspects of their anti-doping program. Among the users are around 3,000 ADO staff from National and Regional Anti-Doping Organizations, International Federations, Major Event Organizations, and delegated third parties, such as the International Testing Agency; roughly 160 personnel from WADA-accredited laboratories; and 150 experts from Athlete Biological Passport Units – all with specific access to the system limited to their needs. But far and away the most numerous of ADAMS’ stakeholders are the 30,000 or so athletes who rely on the system to enable them to update their whereabouts information, review their personal data and generally keep up-to-date on anti-doping matters.

As with all technology-based systems, ADAMS needs to be constantly reviewed and updated to ensure it remains current. As a result, in 2017, WADA initiated significant upgrades to ADAMS’ underlying infrastructure that laid the foundation for a complete rebuild of ADAMS aimed at optimizing support to the global anti-doping program and better serving athletes and anti-doping stakeholders. Referred to as ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS, the rebuild launched a number of modules over the past two years, which prioritize mobility, enhanced connectivity, reliability, performance and general usability. And, like all ‘Next Gen’ features, the new modules were designed with privacy, information security and transparency for end users as absolute priorities.

Specifically

1. In November 2019, WADA launched an all-new whereabouts application for athletes, known as Athlete Central. Available for free download and use from the Apple Store and Google Play, this multi-lingual app features location-based address recommendations and integrated user support. It was designed for athletes – based on extensive consultation that included more than 2,000 athlete submissions – in order to address the challenges they have faced with earlier whereabouts solutions.

2. In January 2020, WADA launched the new Testing Center module, which was developed with planning and monitoring functionalities, effectively reinventing the way that data on doping control programs are presented to ADOs in real time. The new module provides ADOs with a test distribution planning and monitoring tool, as well as a dashboard view of compliance with the Technical Document for Sport Specific Analysis. Together, this equips ADOs with the means to assess their progress more efficiently and act on the information more quickly, and improves WADA’s means to monitor testing activity

3. In May 2021, WADA launched DCO Central, a new doping control sample collection app for tablets that is also available for free from the Apple Store and Google Play. ‘DCO Central’ provides Doping Control Officers from ADOs and Sample Collection Agencies with an online and offline solution for secure and fast data collection as part of doping control sample collection, which is now entirely paperless and, most importantly, connected to ADAMS to reduce manual data entry, while improving data accuracy and the speed and security of data exchange.

WADA Deputy Chief Operating Officer, Stuart Kemp, said: “WADA is proud of what has been achieved with ‘Next Gen’ ADAMS in a relatively short space of time by a committed team of ADAMS and IT experts within WADA. We are particularly grateful to the athletes and stakeholders worldwide that we consulted to ensure that ‘Athlete Central’, the ‘Testing Center’ and ‘DCO Central’ would meet their needs. ADAMS is a critical component of the global anti-doping system and will continue evolving in line with the available technology and the changing needs of athletes and others within the anti-doping community.

“’Next Gen’ ADAMS is also a key initiative of WADA’s 2020-2024 Strategic Plan, which requires the Agency to ensure that its digital tools and services are intuitive, modern, functional and accessible. We want to ensure that athletes receive as much support as possible when it comes to fulfilling their commitment to compete clean and delivering a system that fits in with their preferences and lifestyles is a priority for us.”

WADA ADAMS Team Lead and Senior Manager, Ndiate Chaya Ndiaye, said: “The roll-out of ‘Next Gen’ is being carried out in a strategic, sustainable way, one carefully constructed and tested one module at a time. This affords us the opportunity to showcase the module and invite a focus group of users to experience it and provide feedback for further tweaking, ensuring we get it right before we move on to the next module. It also ensures that there is less risk of a negative impact on daily users by newly introduced bugs, while also offering an opportunity to integrate user metrics to measure the performance of new design with less pressure on training and support teams.”

The improvements will not stop here. More are on the way with better graphics and improved recommendations coming for the ABP module, more user-friendly dashboards and an upgraded submission process for TUEs, as well as a host of intuitive enhancements for the laboratory reporting module.

Ndiate Chaya Ndiaye added: “The history of ADAMS has been characterized by constant improvement and agile evolution much like the anti-doping system itself. The future of ’Next Gen’ ADAMS is going to be no different as we make sure it remains cutting edge and accessible for a brand-new generation of users.”


09/06/21 – WADA SIGNS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING WITH THE CENTRAL EUROPEAN ANTI-DOPING ORGANIZATION TO COLLABORATE ON ANTI-DOPING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

Montreal, 9 June  2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Central European Anti-Doping Organization (CEADO) to collaborate on specific anti-doping program development activities, beginning with a project involving the Eastern Europe Regional Anti-Doping Organization (EERADO).

CEADO is a partnership of eight National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs) from Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Serbia, Slovakia and Slovenia that work together with the main goal of supporting and strengthening the anti-doping system in the region.

The MOU, which has been signed by WADA Director General Olivier Niggli and CEADO Chairman Michael Cepic, requires the two organizations to meet regularly and, as necessary, discuss areas of collaboration that are of a mutual interest. The EERADO project is of particular importance this year as this Regional Anti-Doping Organization is set to disband at the end of 2021 after 13 years of good work. The closure of EERADO comes as its member countries’ NADOs are now in a position to operate independently, allowing WADA to redirect resources to other regions of the world where there is a greater need. This project will enable EERADO members to benefit from ongoing guidance and support as they further develop their national anti-doping programs.

WADA Director General, Olivier Niggli, said: “The global anti-doping system relies on collaboration between various stakeholders, and this MOU between WADA and the Central European Anti-Doping Organization will boost the anti-doping work being carried out between National Anti-Doping Organizations in Europe. The first project with CEADO will provide a comprehensive training and development program for a range of Eastern European countries, helping them to operate effectively outside the Regional Anti-Doping Organization network. Through projects such as this, WADA is assisting the development of innovative anti-doping strategies for those countries that need it most so that the global system is strengthened overall. I thank the leadership of CEADO for their readiness to cooperate in this way, ultimately delivering more effective programs for the protection of clean sport.”

CEADO Chairman, Michael Cepic, said: “The Central European Ant-Doping Organization was founded with the intention of collaborating and sharing experience between its eight members and to work on common projects in various anti-doping areas for the benefit of athletes. We appreciate WADA´s invitation to support Eastern European countries in their common goal to establish independent and World Anti-Doping Code-compliant Anti-Doping Organizations.”

EERADO Director General, Temur Ukleba, said: “This project enables anti-doping managers to get acquainted with the structural development and good governance of Anti-Doping Organizations within this region. It will also offer advice and guidance in relation to legislative and other regulations, effective implementation of the World Anti-Doping Code, guidelines, technical documents and educational platforms, as well as challenges faced by each country. We think this model is an excellent example of successful cooperation on anti-doping issues between countries with different capabilities.”

WADA created the RADO Program in 2004 to build or strengthen anti-doping capacity in parts of the world most at need. The program supports less resourced NADOs and National Olympic Committees acting as NADOs with funding, training and ongoing anti-doping assistance. It currently assists 15 RADOs that include 131 countries across the world.


08/06/21 – WADA AND SHIONOGI PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY SIGN MOU FORMALIZING COLLABORATION TO PROTECT CLEAN SPORT

Montreal, 4 June  2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the major Japanese pharmaceutical company, Shionogi & Co. Ltd., which will ensure that the Agency is notified immediately of any new Shionogi compounds or substances in development that have the potential for sports-related doping abuse.

The MOU, which has been signed by WADA President Witold Bańka and President and CEO of Shionogi & Co., Ltd., Dr. Isao Teshirogi, is the latest commitment from the pharmaceutical industry to assist WADA in its efforts to protect clean sport. Under the terms of the MOU, Shionogi will share information with WADA in relation to compounds in its portfolio that could be used to gain an unfair advantage in the sporting arena.

Following the signing, Mr. Bańka said: “This is another step forward for anti-doping. Through partnerships such as this, the anti-doping community can better anticipate possible doping trends. For the past 10 years, WADA has been working closely with the pharmaceutical industry to identify new compounds that might have a performance-enhancing effect in sport and allow us to develop detection methods at a much faster rate, either before the products have come to market or at the first signs of abuse. I thank our colleagues at Shionogi for their vision and willingness to collaborate in this important aspect of anti-doping.”

President and CEO of Shionogi & Co., Ltd., Dr. Isao Teshirogi, said: “Shionogi is committed to discovering and developing pharmaceutical products as well as to ensuring their correct use in society. Our policy is to supply the best possible medicine to protect the health and wellbeing of the patients we serve. Shionogi supports WADA’s efforts to prevent the abuse of medicines for doping in sport and we are delighted to have signed this MOU. Shionogi hopes that athletes will maintain their health and play sports under fair conditions and we intend to fulfill our social responsibilities as a pharmaceutical company by sharing with WADA all relevant information on compounds under development in our portfolio.”

Since 2011, WADA has been forging alliances with a number of companies within the pharmaceutical sector in order to keep up to date with the ever-shifting drug research and development landscape. These agreements have included some of the biggest and most influential pharmaceutical companies in the world, including Japan, such as GlaxoSmithKline, AstraZeneca, Astellas, Kyowa Kirin, Pfizer and Roche, as well as the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations


08/06/21 – WADA PUBLISHES 2020 MONITORING PROGRAM FIGURES

Montreal, 3 June 2021 

Dear Colleagues,

Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is distributing the 2020 Monitoring Program Figures to stakeholders, as per the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).

The document – which is being shared with you on a confidential basis – provides data for substances, by sport, which were not on the 2020 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (Prohibited List) but that were monitored during 2020 in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport; and, potential inclusion on the List.

Article 4.5 of the 2015 Code (in effect for the 2020 monitoring data) states that “WADA, in consultation with signatories [of the Code] and governments, shall establish a monitoring program regarding substances which are not on the Prohibited List, but which WADA wishes to monitor in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport. […] WADA shall make available to International Federations and National Anti-Doping Organizations, on at least an annual basis, aggregate statistical information by sport regarding the additional substances.”

Should you have any questions, please contact statistics@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


08/06/21 – WADA INVITES STAKEHOLDERS TO NOMINATE CANDIDATES FOR 2022 STANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER VACANCIES

Montreal, 31 May 2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) invites its stakeholders to nominate candidates for vacant positions on WADA’s 2022 Standing Committees.
 
The following Standing Committees, which report to WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo), play a key advisory role in policy and priority development for the Agency. The successful candidates will be approved by WADA’s ExCo on 20 November 2021 and take office on 1 January 2022 for three-year terms. This call for nominations is in accordance with WADA’s Governance Regulations which require the Agency, on an annual basis, to announce its call for nominations six months prior to when the decision will be taken by the ExCo.
 
Aside from outlining the vacancies, WADA is pleased to provide links to the current Terms of Reference (TOR) that outline the scope of work and functioning for each Standing Committee.
 

Committees [Terms of Reference (TOR)]Vacant positionsDeadline
Athlete Committee [TOR]
Five positions
 
[Two seats are filled by Athletes who also sit on WADA’s Foundation Board]
 
Friday, 1 October 2021
Compliance Review Committee [TOR]
 

One independent compliance expert position 

As stated in WADA’s Governance Regulations, WADA’s Nominations Committee shall be responsible for recruiting, reviewing and vetting the candidates for the positions of independent members of the CRC. Applicants who meet the stricter independence criteria required for independent members of the CRC, may however apply in order to expand the candidate pool from which the Nominations Committee can consider.
 
Friday, 3 September 2021
 
[Earlier deadline because of the involvement of the Nominations Committee in the process.]
Education Committee [TOR]Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021
Finance and Administration Committee [TOR]Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021
Health, Medical and Research Committee [TOR]Four positionsFriday, 1 October 2021


WADA President Witold Bańka said: “WADA benefits greatly from its diverse and committed Committee members. Their expertise and advice to WADA’s Executive Committee and Management is crucial to advancing the Agency’s mission for doping-free sport. We encourage all stakeholders to consider their respective regions and organizations and to nominate suitable candidates for the vacant positions on WADA’s 2022 Standing Committees.”
 
How to submit nominations
 
To be considered, all applications must include the following:

  1. an updated curriculum vitae(1), which fully outlines the candidate’s experience and expertise; and
  2. a letter of endorsement from one of WADA’s current Foundation Board members or a recognized WADA stakeholder group. [It should be noted that this is not required of the independent compliance expert position.]

Applicants submitting their file to be considered by WADA’s Nominations Committee for the vacancy of independent compliance expert will need to include confirmation that they meet the required stricter independence criteria.

Applications are to be forwarded by Friday, 1 October 2021 (or Friday, 3 September 2021 as it relates to the CRC vacancy) to Mr. Olivier Niggli, WADA Director General (c/o marjorie.chinnarassen@wada-ama.org).

Any questions should also be directed to Mr. Niggli, c/o Ms. Chinnarassen.

Note:
(1) For purposes of review, evaluation and approval, candidates consent to the sharing of their curriculum vitae and candidate file (and personal information contained therein) with the WADA Director General, the Chair of the relevant Standing Committee, the Nominations Committee where applicable, and the Executive Committee and Foundation Board, in accordance with Article VI, By-Laws on Standing Committees, and IX. Candidate Privacy Policy, of WADA’s Governance Regulations. Candidates are asked to review the Candidate Privacy Policy for details about how their personal information will be processed by WADA. By submitting their application, candidates confirm that they have read and understood the policy and accept its terms.


08/06/21 – WADA PUBLISHES REVISED TECHNICAL DOCUMENTS AND NEW TECHNICAL LETTERS

Montreal, 31 May 2021

Dear Colleagues,

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes revised versions of five Technical Documents (TDs) (along with their Summaries of Modifications); as well as, two new Technical Letters (TLs), which were approved by WADA’s Executive Committee on 20 May 2021.
 
REVISED TECHNICAL DOCUMENTS

Under the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), WADA’s TDs are issued to provide direction to WADA-accredited Laboratories, WADA-approved Laboratories and other stakeholders on specific technical or procedural issues. As part of WADA’s mandate to enhance anti-doping activities under the World Anti-Doping Code, TDs undergo periodic revisions to address scientific and technological advances in the performance of anti-doping tests and the reporting of test results, as well as to reflect feedback received from WADA-accredited Laboratories and other WADA stakeholders.

The revised TDs, along with their Summaries of Modifications, are listed below and are available and indexed on WADA’s website:

  1. TD2021BAR Analytical Requirements for the Hematological Module of the Athlete Biological Passport, along with the Summary of Modifications.

    In this revised version of the TD2021BAR, in Article 6.1, the reference to International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI) Annex K, Article K.2.4 was replaced by ISTI Annex I, Article I.2.7.
  2. TD2021EPO Harmonization of Analysis and Reporting of Erythropoietin (EPO) and other Erythropoietin-Receptor Agonists (ERAs) by Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoretic (PAGE) Analytical Methods, along with the Summary of Modifications.

    In this revised version of the TD2021EPO, the implementation date of the TD was postponed to 1 September 2021. This modification, which was requested by the WADA EPO Working Group, was triggered by the difficulties faced by certain laboratories in becoming compliant with the new requirements of the TD2021EPO under the existing COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.
  3. TD2021IRMS Detection of Synthetic Forms of Prohibited Substances by GC/C/IRMS, along with the Summary of Modifications.

    In this revised version of the TD2021IRMS, the following points were modified:
  • Article 1.0: Clarification that the general technical recommendations and method validation requirements described in this TD shall also be applied to the analysis of 19-norandrosterone (19-NA) and 19-noretiocholanolone (19-NE), notwithstanding that these two substances are subject of a separate TD (TDNA).
  • Article 1.1.3: Clarification that the same endogenous reference compounds (ERCs) and target compounds (TCs) that led to the “A” sample Adverse Analytical Finding shall be measured in the “B” sample.
  • Article 2.1.1: Clarification that sample volume adjustment may allow the analysis of TCs and ERCs present in the sample at a concentration lower than the respective limit of quantification (LOQ) as long as the signal is within the validated linearity range of the IRMS instrument for that particular analyte.
  • Article 2.1.2: The reference to the monitoring of the precision of the 45/44 and 46/44 ratios as a check for the stability of CO2 pulses has been removed.
  • Article 2.1.2: Equation 3 for the mass balance adjustment of measured δ13C values of acetylated compounds has been reviewed. The term “C” in Eq. 3 had been misquoted as representing the concentration and therefore has been removed.
  • Article 2.3.2: Clarification under criterion iv. that the criterion for the ERC-A and ERC-Etio pairs may be applied only if no other criterion based on the measurement of T, 5α-Adiol and/or 5β-Adiol can be used.
  • Article 2.4.2: Clarification that the laboratory shall explain, in the comments section of the Test Report in ADAMS, the reason(s) why pregnanediol (PD) could not be used as the ERC1.
  1. TD2021NA Harmonization of Analysis and Reporting of 19-Norsteroids Related to Nandrolone, along with the Summary of Modifications.

    In this revised version of the TD, the unnecessary requirement to inject a blank urine sample before the sample under confirmation was removed from Article 3.2.3. It is considered that the potential of any contamination shall be addressed by the laboratory during method validation, and that the use of negative quality control (NQC) and positive quality control (PQC) samples is sufficient to monitor any issues during routine analysis. 
  2. TD2021EAAS Measuring and Reporting of Endogenous Anabolic Androgenic Steroid (EAAS) Markers of the Urinary Steroid Profile, along with the Summary of Modifications.

    In this revised version of the TD, the misquotation of some article numbers, which erroneously referenced articles that no longer exist in the TD2021IRMS, was corrected in Articles 3.3.1 and 3.3.2. Therefore, those specific TDIRMS article numbers have been removed and replaced by a general reference to the TDIRMS. 

    In addition, it was clarified in Article 3.3.2 that the Laboratory shall also report the measured specific gravity of the “B” Sample.

DEADLINES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE REVISED TDs

All WADA-accredited Laboratories are required to implement these TDs in their procedures by the following deadlines (WADA-approved Laboratories are only expected to implement TD2021BAR):

1 June 2021:

  • TD2021BAR
  • TD2021NA
  • TD2021EAAS
  • TD2021IRMS

1 September 2021:

  • TD2021EPO

NEW TECHNICAL LETTERS

Under the ISL, WADA’s TLs are issued in letter format on an ad-hoc basis in order to provide direction to the WADA-accredited and WADA-approved Laboratories and other stakeholders on particular issues related to the analysis, interpretation and reporting of results for specific Prohibited Substance(s) and/or Prohibited Method(s) or to the application of specific laboratory procedures.

The TLs below were developed as a result of the recommendations made by the WADA Working Group on Contaminants and are available and indexed on WADA’s website:

  • TL23 – Minimum Reporting Level for Certain Substances known to be Potential Meat Contaminants

    This new TL includes clarification regarding the reporting and results management of findings for certain substances (clenbuterol, ractopamine, zeranol and zilpaterol) which may be used as growth promoters for livestock in some countries and therefore may be associated with findings resulting from the consumption of contaminated meat.
  • TL24 – Minimum Reporting Level for Certain Diuretics that are known Contaminants of Pharmaceutical Products

    This new TL includes clarification regarding the reporting and results management of findings for certain diuretics (acetazolamide, bumetanide, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, torsemide and triamterene) which are known to be found as contaminants of some pharmaceutical products.

DEADLINE FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NEW TECHNICAL LETTERS

All WADA-accredited and WADA-approved Laboratories are required to implement these new TLs in their procedures by 1 June 2021.

Should you have any questions or comments regarding these revised Technical Documents and new Technical Letters, please contact WADA’s Science Department at: science@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


28/05/21 – WADA EXTENDS DEADLINE TO RESPOND TO SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH SURVEY TO 16 JUNE

Montreal, 27 May 2021

Dear Colleagues,

Following our communication of 27 April regarding the Social Science Research (SSR) Collaboration Platform, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) informs stakeholders that the deadline to respond to the social science research survey that accompanied the communication has been extended from 31 May to 16 June 2021.

The survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback in the area of social science research as it relates to sport integrity; and, since it was launched, WADA has received responses from over 220 organizations and researchers. We would like to thank all stakeholders who took the time to respond and encourage others to complete the survey to ensure as many contributions as possible.

Stakeholders are kindly asked to provide feedback on their experience with social science research to help participating organizations learn the needs of the sporting community; and, improve their support and promotion of social science research in sport in the future.

The Social Science Research Collaboration Platform is an informal “community of practice” for international organizations that fund or support social science research in sport integrity matters. Its focus is to share best practices and raise the visibility of the research to increase its usability and, ultimately, its impact on the sporting system. The organizations involved engage to share experiences using their collective insights to improve the benefits of social science research – including reducing duplication and importantly, improving the way in which it is disseminated, understood and adopted by stakeholders in the field of sport.

Other member organizations participating in the Platform include; the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Partnership for Clean Competition (PCC) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Should you have any questions regarding the Social Science Research Collaboration Platform, or any of the information outlined above, please contact Ani Meliksetyan, Coordinator, Research and Policy (Education), at: ssr@wada-ama.org.

Thank you and best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


27/05/21 – WADA ANNOUNCES INDEPENDENT OBSERVER TEAMS FOR TOKYO GAMES

Montreal, 26 May 2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce its planned Independent Observer (IO) program for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, which will run from 23 July to 8 August, and from 24 August to 5 September 2021, respectively.  

WADA’s IO program, which complements WADA’s compliance monitoring of Major Events Organizations, is intended to provide oversight and instill confidence in both athletes and the public as to the quality, effectiveness, and reliability of anti-doping programs during major events such as the Olympic and Paralympic Games and other international, multisport events.
 
WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “Since it was launched at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, WADA’s Independent Observer program has provided important oversight of anti-doping programs at the Olympic Games, Paralympic Games and other major international sporting events. Working in collaboration with event organizers, the impartial and multi-skilled Independent Observer teams have helped to strengthen anti-doping delivery for more than 50 major events. Whether in real-time during the events or via the reports that are delivered afterwards, thanks to this program, important improvements have been made to how anti-doping is delivered during major events – all aimed at providing robust protections for athletes.”
 
For the Tokyo Games, the teams will once again be composed of international experts across the full range of anti-doping disciplines – a mix of WADA and other Anti-Doping Organizations’ specialists – and will observe all aspects of the programs, including:

  • Test distribution planning;
  • Selection of competitors for testing;
  • Notification of doping control;
  • Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) procedures;
  • Chain of custody; and
  • Sample analysis and results management.

The teams, outlined below, will provide daily feedback as to possible improvements that could be made to the program, which is being operated by the International Testing Agency (ITA), on behalf of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), respectively. The IO teams will then issue post-Games reports that will formalize recommendations for the IOC, the IPC, the WADA-accredited laboratory in Tokyo, the organizing committees, and WADA – all designed to enhance anti-doping activities at future events.
 
Independent Observer Team – Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

  • Dr. Francesca Rossi (Italy), Director of Testing, National Anti-Doping Agency of France (Chair);
  • George Tsamis (Greece), Senior Manager, Standards and Harmonization, WADA (Vice-Chair);
  • Dr. Osquel Barroso (Cuba), Senior Deputy Director, Laboratories, WADA;
  • Gina Gill Herrera (Colombia), Manager, Athlete Biological Passport and TUEs, National Anti-Doping Agency of Colombia;
  • Kenny Lee (Republic of Korea), Manager, Asia and Oceania Office, WADA;
  • Greg McKenna (UK), Head of Biathlon Integrity Unit, International Biathlon Union;
  • Aya Nakitanda (Uganda), Medical Doctor and President, National Anti-Doping Agency of Uganda (former athlete); and
  • Marissa Sunio (USA), Senior Manager, Legal Affairs, WADA.

Independent Observer Team – Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

  • Jenny Schulze (Sweden), Manager, Testing and Science, National Anti-Doping Agency of Sweden (Chair);
  • Ieva Lukosiute-Stanikuniene (Lithuania), Senior Manager, NADO/RADO Relations and Development, WADA (Vice-Chair);
  • Thomas Delaye-Fortin (Canada), Head of Legal and Governance; Badminton World Federation;
  • Yoko Dozono (Japan), Medical Consultant (TUEs), WADA; and
  • Jeongmin Lee (Republic of Korea), Member, Asian Paralympic Committee Athletes’ Council (former athlete).           

WADA’s Outreach Program, which has been a long-standing fixture during the Games to raise anti-doping awareness among athletes and others, will not be present in Tokyo in its usual format due to the COVID-19 restrictions. While these important face-to-face interactions will not be possible on this occasion, the program is still planning static imagery and other ways to promote clean sport inside the Athlete Village and will distribute Play True promotional items to athletes being tested in the Village.


25/05/21 – WADA TO HOLD MORE REGIONAL ‘LIVE’ WEBINARS
IN JUNE

Montreal, 24 May 2021 

Today, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes the Agency’s ‘live’ webinar schedule for June, which encompasses all webinars being offered; in particular, as part of WADA’s:

Unless otherwise noted, the webinars are being hosted in English only.
 

Date/TimeSession TitleSpeakersWebinar Series & Target audienceTo register
1 June
07:00 EDT/
11:00 GMT
 
Webinar for Athletes participating in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games
 
(in French)
Amadou Dia Ba, Former Olympic Silver Medalist from Senegal and Chair of the Athletes’ Commission of the Association of National Olympic Committees of Africa

Sameh Elray, Manager, Africa Office, WADA (Moderator)
 
Kadidiatou Kanouté Tounkara,
Former Olympic Basketball Player from Mali, Chair of WADA Education Committee and Member of WADA Athlete Committee
Africa Series

For Athletes, Athlete Support Personnel,
National Olympic Committees (NOCs) and Athlete Commissions from African countries
To register, please send your information (name, country, job title) to sameh.elray@wada-ama.org as soon as possible
17 June
04:00 EDT/ 09:00 CET
 
Anti-doping regional workshop for National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs) and Law EnforcementMathieu Holz, Senior Investigator, Intelligence and Investigations, WADA


Sébastien Gaillard, Criminal Intelligence Officer, INTERPOL General Secretariat
N/A

For anti-doping experts from NADOs and Law Enforcement from Central European countries
Registration via invitation only
22 June
22:30 EDT/
23 June
11:30 Tokyo Time
Results Management under the 2021 International Standard for Results ManagementKenny Lee, Manager, Asia/Oceania Office, WADA (Moderator)

Tharinda Puth, Manager, Legal Affairs, WADA
CISP Series / Asia-Oceania Series

For Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) and members of Disciplinary/ Appeal Panels from Asia/Oceania countries
Register here
 
Please first create an ADEL account before registering via the link above.
29 June
22:30 EDT/
30 June
11:30 Tokyo Time
Applicable Sanctions in Results Management Kenny Lee, Manager, Asia/Oceania Office, WADA (Moderator)

Tharinda Puth, Manager, Legal Affairs, WADA
CISP Series / Asia-Oceania Series

For ADOs and members of Disciplinary/ Appeal Panels from Asia/Oceania countries
Register here
 
Please first create an ADEL account before registering via the link above.


We also take the opportunity to remind stakeholders of the remaining webinars to be held in May:
 

Date/TimeSession TitleSpeakersWebinar Series & Target audienceTo register
27 May
04:00 EDT/ 09:00 CET
Anti-doping regional workshop for NADOs and Law EnforcementMathieu Holz, Senior Investigator, Intelligence and Investigations, WADA


Sébastien Gaillard, Criminal Intelligence Officer, INTERPOL General Secretariat
N/A

For anti-doping experts from NADOs and Law Enforcement from Central European countries
Registration via invitation only
31 May
07:00 EDT/
11:00 GMT
Webinar for Athletes participating in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic GamesDr. Aya Nakitanda, Olympian swimmer (Uganda) & Chair of the Africa Zone V Regional Anti-Doping Organization Education Committee
 
Rodney Swigelaar,
Director, Africa Office, WADA (Moderator)
Africa Series

For Athletes,
Athlete Support Personnel,
NOCs and Athlete Commissions from African countries
To register, please send your information
(name, country,
job title) to sameh.elray@wada-ama.org
as soon as possible

To register, please simply view the registration instructions in the ‘To register’ sections of the above table.

Please note that on an ongoing basis, WADA will communicate its evolving live webinar schedule and prompt stakeholders to register and participate.

Should you have any questions regarding the above, please contact Ms. Selva Balasingam, WADA Communications Coordinator, at: selva.balasingam@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


18/05/21 – WADA STATEMENT ON THE U.S. OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY REPORT TO CONGRESS

Montreal, 17 May 2021 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) acknowledges today’s report submitted by the United States Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to the U.S. Congress regarding the ongoing governance reform taking place within WADA.

In the report, the ONDCP highlights some of the meaningful reforms that WADA has implemented since 2018 as well as some further enhancements it would like to see. Thanks to the reforms that have been carried out already, one-third of the 14-member Executive Committee (ExCo) and 38-member Foundation Board (Board) is now made up of active or former elite athletes while there are four independent members of the ExCo, including the President and Vice-President. Further reforms are being considered, including the introduction of a Code of Ethics and the formation of an independent Ethics Board to ensure compliance with the standards of conduct required for good governance.

WADA President Witold Bańka said: “WADA takes note that the ONDCP recognizes the hard work and considerable progress achieved by the Agency during the past year.

“Enhancing our governance model, increasing our independence and ensuring that athletes remain at the forefront of everything WADA does continues to be a key priority of my Presidency. On that front, I am proud of WADA’s accomplishments to date. There is more work to be done in this area and, in collaboration with all of our diverse stakeholders, including the U.S. Government, we will continue to make meaningful improvements, following a democratic and consultative process, on how the Agency is governed to ensure it evolves together with our role and with the global fight against doping in sport in general.

“The long-standing partnership between WADA and the U.S. Government is important for the protection of clean sport around the world. As a founding member of WADA, the U.S. Government has historically played a significant and constructive leadership role. We anticipate that the Biden-Harris Administration will work with us to maintain that position. To that end, I look forward to welcoming the Acting Director of the ONDCP, Regina LaBelle, to her first meeting of the Foundation Board later this week. Indeed, I have personally invited Acting Director LaBelle to play a leading role in WADA’s development of a Code of Ethics and formation of an independent Ethics Board.

“In addition, WADA continues to offer its support to the U.S. Government, the ONDCP and the United States Anti-Doping Agency in their efforts to strengthen the fight against doping in their country. Currently, approximately 90% of American athletes do not compete under the terms of the World Anti-Doping Code, with the main professional leagues and college sports so far operating outside that protection.

“WADA was formed 22 years ago on a foundation of international cooperation and collaboration between Public Authorities and the Sports Movement, with the U.S. Government very much to the fore. We are focused on moving forward and meeting today’s challenges together in a spirit of partnership.


13/05/21 – WADA LAUNCHES STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION FOR THE 2022 PROHIBITED LIST

Montreal, 12 May 2021

Dear Colleagues,

Annually, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) consults its stakeholders to review the content and structural changes being proposed to the following year’s List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (Prohibited List), which is an International Standard under Article 4.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code).
 
As part of the consultation process, stakeholder feedback is collected throughout the year. Then, in January and April of every year, WADA’s List Expert Group meets to discuss the feedback, evidence and proposed content and/or structural changes; and, to formulate the draft Prohibited List for the following year.
 
On 26-27 April and 7 May, the List Expert Group met virtually to prepare the following documents, which we are confidentially giving you access to today for Stakeholder Consultation purposes via WADAConnect, the Agency’s online stakeholder consultation platform:

  1. Draft 2022 Prohibited List
  2. Draft 2022 Monitoring Program
  3. Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes, which are intended to facilitate your review

As is customary, WADA kindly asks that someone within your organization, with the relevant professional experience and expertise in anti-doping, be given the opportunity to carefully review the draft 2022 Prohibited List and provide comments concerning the proposed content (additions, deletions or other modifications) and/or structural changes. We would ask that, whenever possible, comments be supported by relevant reference(s) to medical or scientific evidence; pharmacological effect; and/or, personal experience concerning the substances or methods in question.

As it relates to the change in S9: Glucocorticoids, you may recall that when WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) considered the draft 2021 List at its September 2020 meeting, it approved prohibiting all injectable routes of administration of glucocorticoids in-competition; and, asked WADA Management to implement the prohibition on 1 January 2022 (vs. 2021). This was to allow enough time for: broad communication and education of athletes, their entourage and medical personnel; WADA-accredited laboratories to update their procedures; and, medical and support personnel to address the safe use of glucocorticoids for clinical purposes within anti-doping. Nevertheless, if you have suggestions on how to refine this change, we invite you to do so.

As usual, the WADAConnect platform will encourage respondents, separately, to propose further additions, deletions or other modifications under ‘Comments for future consideration’; which, will be evaluated and considered carefully over the course of the year but are unlikely to be incorporated within the 2022 Prohibited List. 
 
We believe that conducting this Stakeholder Consultation helps ensure that the Prohibited List evolves in step with the highest possible scientific standards; and, reflects the needs of the anti-doping community.
 
In keeping with the annual process, the 2022 Prohibited List will not be made public until after it is approved by WADA’s ExCo at its September meeting. Therefore, we ask you to ensure that the draft is kept confidential in order to preserve the integrity of the Stakeholder Consultation process. As we know, earlier publication would compromise the process and lead to confusion in the minds of athletes and other stakeholders worldwide.
 
To provide comments

  1. Simply connect to WADAConnect. If you do not currently have access, please consult the short guide on how to create a user account that is available on the platform.
  2. Once you have a user account, please inform Ms. Hai-Yen Huynh at WADA’s Science & Medical Department at hai-yen.huynh@wada-ama.org and ask to be added to the private List Consultation Group. This is necessary in order to provide comments.  
  3. Please input your comments by 16 July 2021

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact hai-yen.huynh@wada-ama.org.

Thank you in advance for your organization’s feedback.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency


06/05/21 – WADA IMPOSES ANALYTICAL TESTING RESTRICTION ON THE BUCHAREST LABORATORY

Montreal, 5 May 2021 – Effective 1 May 2021 and for a period of up to six months, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has imposed an analytical testing restriction (ATR) on the Romanian Doping Control Laboratory in Bucharest (Bucharest Laboratory) as it relates to the Gas Chromatography / Combustion / Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) analytical method.

In April 2021, the Bucharest Laboratory voluntarily informed WADA that it would be unable to update its GC/C/IRMS method by the time WADA’s updated Technical Document on IRMS (TD2021IRMS) came into effect on 1 May 2021. As such, in keeping with the International Standard for Laboratories (ISL), the ATR is not being imposed due to any underperformance or specific non-conformity resulting from the application of its GC/C/IRMS procedure. Rather, it is being imposed so the Laboratory can focus its efforts on improving its GC/C/IRMS method in compliance with the new TD2021IRMS requirements.

During the ATR, the Bucharest Laboratory can continue carrying out its regular anti-doping activities, as per the ISL. However, all routine samples that require GC/C/IRMS analysis shall be securely transported with a demonstrable chain of custody for GC/C/IRMS analysis to another WADA-accredited laboratory.

According to the ISL, WADA is responsible for accrediting and re-accrediting anti-doping laboratories, thereby ensuring that they maintain the highest quality standards. This monitoring process is conducted in conjunction with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) assessment by independent national accreditation bodies that are full members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) and signatories to the ILAC Mutual Recognition Arrangement (ILAC MRA). 


04/05/21 – WADA SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH: DRIVING ANTI-DOPING FORWARD

In this latest edition of ‘Spotlight’, which keeps stakeholders up to date on the activities being carried out by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) team and its partners, we look at scientific research and the crucial role it continues to play in the protection of clean sport. Previous ‘Spotlight’ features are available on 
WADA’s website

The importance of science to the protection of sport’s integrity cannot be overstated, which is why it is at the very heart of WADA’s mission for doping-free sport. To keep it there, it is vital that scientific knowledge continues to evolve and mature, which makes research the key to driving advances in anti-doping.

Since 2001, WADA has helped researchers around the world develop breakthroughs in anti-doping science. The Agency’s scientific research grants are critical because they increase the volume of research dedicated to developing new and improved detection methods for performance-enhancing substances and methods as well as attract researchers with fresh ways of thinking.

Cutting-edge research helps the anti-doping community in a range of ways, providing the tools needed to protect sport. These objectives include:

  • Improving existing detection methods;
  • Developing new tests;
  • Detecting new substances (both directly and indirectly through markers);
  • Integrating new technologies into the system; and
  • Anticipating new trends in doping.

In a nutshell, this is what research is trying to find out and why it is so important to sport’s integrity.

WADA Senior Executive Director, Science and International Partnerships, Dr. Olivier Rabin, said: “Scientific research is a cornerstone of anti-doping. Understanding what certain substances do to enhance performance and then devising robust ways to detect those substances through testing and sample analysis is, in large part, how we catch those who cheat and deter others who might be tempted. It is absolutely vital for the system that we stay up to date on the very latest developments and to do that we work with some of the most brilliant and innovative scientists in the world.”

Major breakthroughs

In the 20 years of WADA-funded research, almost USD 83 million has been invested in more than 500 projects, all which have benefited WADA and other anti-doping authorities that are striving to keep sport clean. Some of the breakthroughs that science has enabled include:

  • Developing and constantly improving tests to detect erythropoietin (EPO), human growth hormone, gene doping and many other prohibited substances and methods (often before they are available on the market);
  • Devising the first consolidated List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, which came into force in 2004, and strengthening it every year since;
  • Harmonizing and improving analytical capabilities in anti-doping laboratories;
  • Developing exciting new innovations, such as dried blood spot analysis and artificial intelligence for future applications in anti-doping.

Dr. Rabin said: “As outlined within WADA’s 2020-2024 Strategic Plan, WADA wants to do more impactful research based on key priorities and outcomes in order to lead some future global changes in the anti-doping community and also be more athlete centered by bringing scientific and medical results closer to the daily preoccupation of athletes. One way we will do that is through the integration of new, innovative technologies to benefit collection procedures, the security of samples and the processing of data associated to sample analysis, as well as making information on prohibited substances and methods more readily accessible and visible to the athletes and their entourage.

“It is encouraging to see that, after a few years of WADA’s anti-doping research budget being diverted to other areas of high priority for the Agency, the funding is coming back. With continued financial support in this area, I am confident that we can make even more breakthroughs in collaboration with our partners to further protect clean sport for athletes.”

WADA’s annual budget is sourced equally from governments of the world and the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Some of the additional investment has come about thanks to an IOC initiative announced in November 2019. Specifically, the IOC President pledged to match any contributions from governments in support of the Agency’s research and/or investigations activities. With matching funding by the IOC, the initiative has raised more than USD 7 million for these core activities – more than USD 4.7 million of which will be allocated to research.

Dr. Rabin: added: “WADA is very grateful to the IOC and to the many governments that have responded to the IOC’s call so far. We appeal to other governments to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity as much as possible.”

Range of rewarding collaborations

This financial boost will give WADA-funded researchers greater scope to forge ahead with their ground-breaking collaborations. WADA Deputy Director, Science and Medicine, Dr. Marcia MacDonald, said: “Our research – like so much in science – is collaborative. We recognize the value of partnerships. We work with a range or organizations, such as the United Nations (through agencies such as the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, UNESCO and the World Health Organization), the European Union, the Council of Europe, the Partnership for Clean Competition, the International Testing Agency, Anti-Doping Organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, universities and other research bodies, and many provincial and national governments of the world.

“Even outside our formal calls for proposals, we are always open to scientists from around the world who want to make a difference in this space. If anyone has an idea that could have a beneficial application in anti-doping, then they are encouraged to let us know. We want to hear from them.”

As a scientist with a background in biochemistry and genetics, Dr. MacDonald believes that the area of anti-doping research is one of the most rewarding fields she could be in. She said: “One of the things that excites me about working with WADA is the relative ease of the implementation of research results into anti-doping practice. In addition to that and the very collaborative and inclusive community of anti-doping scientists, I like the way this work combines many diverse scientific topics with policy. There are so many aspects of the World Anti-Doping Code and other harmonizing documents that are connected to anti-doping science in some way, so there is always something challenging to work on.”

Pushing the boundary of anti-doping knowledge is one of WADA’s vital functions, work that is overseen by the Agency’s Health, Medical and Research Committee (HMRC) chaired by Prof. Lars Engebretsen from Norway. This Standing Committee monitors scientific developments in sport with the aim of safeguarding doping-free sport practice. With this aim, it oversees the following WADA Expert Advisory Groups: Prohibited List, Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs), Laboratory and Gene and Cell Doping. The HRMC is also involved in the selection of WADA-funded scientific research grant projects and assesses the latest trends to ensure these projects remain relevant.

Annual call for exciting and innovative projects

On a yearly basis, WADA promotes and funds scientific research projects in such areas as the optimization of analytical tools for the detection of doping substances or methods, the enhancement of the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP), as well as the pharmacology of prohibited substances and of drug combinations. With this objective, WADA gives high priority to projects with direct and imminent applicability in the fight against doping in sport. More specifically, applicants are encouraged to propose translational research beyond the discovery stage, and the proposed projects should always aim to attain concrete deliverables by the end of the funding period.

For 2021, WADA received 66 proposals, which are currently being reviewed by external independent reviewers and an additional panel of experts. The final ranking and recommendation to WADA’s Executive Committee will be established by the HMRC.

Dr. Rabin added: “Receiving and assessing these grant applications is one of the highlights of the year. We get to hear about exciting projects from a range of talented and ambitious scientists, and work out how they might best fit in to our overall vision for clean sport. It is always inspiring and is an annual reminder of just how many people care deeply about protecting athletes and the integrity of sport. This is what WADA is all about.”


03/05/21 – WADA COLLABORATES WITH INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS TO RAISE THE VISIBILITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH IN SPORT

Stakeholders interested in improving social science research regarding sport integrity are invited to respond to a short survey by 31 May

Montreal, 27 April 2021

Dear Colleagues,
 
The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is pleased to announce the launch of a Social Science Research (SSR) Collaboration Platform established by WADA in partnership with the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Partnership for Clean Competition (PCC) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to raise the visibility of social science research in Sport.
 
The Social Science Research Collaboration Platform is an informal “community of practice” for international organizations that fund or support social science research in sport integrity matters. Its focus is to share best practices and raise the visibility of social science research to increase its usability and, ultimately, its impact on the sporting system. The organizations involved engage to share experiences using their collective insights to improve the benefits of social science research, including reducing duplication of research and importantly, improving the way in which social science research is disseminated, understood and adopted by stakeholders in the field of sport.
 
In order to promote this unique partnership, the Social Science Research Collaboration Platform is pleased to publish jointly today:

  1. A Communiqué that highlights the social science research opportunities available for stakeholders; and
  2. A Survey designed to gather stakeholder feedback in the area of social science research as it relates to sport integrity. Stakeholders are kindly asked to provide feedback by 31 May on their experience with social science research to help participating organizations learn the needs of the sporting community; and, improve their support and promotion of social science research in sport in the future.

As outlined in the Communiqué, while each of the organizations involved in the Social Science Research Collaboration Platform has its own specific research priorities, the overarching research themes that capture all of the organizations’ common interests are:

  • Athlete welfare/wellbeing
  • Sport integrity
  • Values-based education
  • Sport governance
  • Effectiveness of education
  • Equality and inclusion in sport
  • Athlete environment/influences on behavior
  • Impact of technology on sport integrity

WADA and its partners are confident that the Social Science Research Collaboration Platform will have a positive impact on the sporting system and welcomes requests to join the Platform from other international and regional organizations that have a role in funding or supporting social science research in sport (including private organizations).

Should you have any questions regarding the new Social Science Research Collaboration Platform, or any of the information outlined above, please contact Ani Meliksetyan, Coordinator, Research and Policy (Education), at: ssr@wada-ama.org.

Best regards,

World Anti-Doping Agency